Children

Children

What children say about children's books

Ask an adult what makes a children's book appealing, and she might talk about the colorful artwork, the clever storytelling or the lessons imparted.

Ask a child what makes a children's book appealing, and she might say, "It is weird and happy!"

Obviously, children and adults have different ideas about what makes a good children's book.

Librarians censoring children's reading?

Ann Giles (the bookwitch) says that 'The censorship I have encountered on behalf of my children has mostly come from librarians' <a href="http://blogs.guardian.co.uk/books/2008/06/children_know_which_books_they.html ">in the Guardian</a> she says "There are lots of conflicting opinions about what children should and shouldn't read. In my experience, the kids themselves are the best judges"

Reading Sets You Free

Karen Schneider on why we’re passionate about “kids” learning & reading:

Reading — deeply, truly reading — is a wonderfully subversive act, one that undermines everything we are told about learning in this society. The world tells us that learning happens in boxes approved by government (school) and business (the commercial world). We are plopped in chairs for twelve or sixteen years and told how to think, and during that time and for the rest of our lives we are bathed in messages designed to shape our thoughts and actions.

Meghan McCain Writing Patriotic Bio of Dad

Love what the NYT says on the subject: "With just a few days left until Father’s Day, way to make us all look bad, Meghan McCain."

McCain just finished writing a flattering children’s picture book about her father’s life [no Ron Reagan she], set to come out just as her father accepts the Republican nomination in September.

The book illustrated by Dan Andreasen, follows Mr. McCain’s life from his childhood as a Navy brat up until the Republican National Convention in September. Ms. McCain deals delicately with some of the less kid-friendly topics, such as his 5.5 years as a prisoner of war in Vietnam. “He didn’t get the right kind of medical care for his broken bones, and the food was really bad,” she writes, accompanied by a somber drawing of Mr. McCain, looking apprehensive if not scared, sitting on the floor in a bare corner.

“We really focus on what he learned during that period,” said Mark McVeigh, an editorial director at the Simon and Schuster imprint Aladdin.

Cozy Book Furniture For Your Children('s Section)

Often, when attending classes or sessions on library design, I'll hear about how such and such library adopted a sci-fi theme for their youth area. Or this and so library went with a Where the Wild Things Are theme for their children's section.

Here's a wild idea, why not adopt a library and book theme for your kid's area and then get some furniture that looks like big freakin' books?

If not for a library, with some venture capital I'd open a coffee house with furniture like this!

Library v. School, and School Wins

A battle over books broke out at Saugus MA Town Meeting on Monday, pitting the library against the struggling school system.

In the end, the schools won out, receiving an unexpected $75,000, while the library budget was cut by the same amount, according to the Boston Globe. The additional funding for the schools will be used to hire two reading teachers at the elementary level.

"The $75,000 would make it possible for people to keep working in the library, and back up the reading programs in the schools," said resident Martha Clouse. "It will bring us a step closer to recertification."
Town Meeting member Barbara Malone, a former School Committee chairwoman, countered that the schools must produce strong readers.

"What is the point of having a library serving children who can't read?" she said. "I'd just like you to think about that."

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Public libraries allow minors to check out R-rated movies

From ABC15 (KNXV-TV) in Phoenix, AZ: <a href="http://www.abc15.com/content/news/investigators/story.aspx?content_id=FA1BCA1F-D105-4109-AAFB-D51AD8A9A7C5&gsa=true">Public libraries allow minors to check out R-rated movies</a>: <blockquote>R-rated movies with sex, nudity, and graphic violence are available for check-out at public libraries across the Valley, and the ABC15 Investigators found teenagers can get movies there they can't at the video store . . .

Revolution in the Stacks

Article from the June 2008 issue of Governing Magazine by Christopher Swope:

Interesting view of public libraries from the municipalities' point of view -- "To appeal to a new generation, some libraries are positioning themselves as places to create content."

This is not your parents' library, or yours either

We never had this as kids! Toronto Public Library offers a new literacy playground. From the light-up entrance to the silver rocket ship to the wall of spinning blocks, this is so not the library you grew up with. The Toronto Public Library today opens the first of several planned KidsStops – an indoor literacy playground – located in the S. Walter Stewart branch in East York, which has been closed since September 2006 for a major renovation. http://www.thestar.com/article/432693

Deadline May 31: Free tickets to the Newbery/Caldecott/Wilder Banquet at ALA Annual

There is still time to send in your application for free tickets to the Newbery/Caldecott/Wilder Banquet at ALA Annual: Deadline is May 31, 2008. Apply now!

AWARD and AWARD CRITERIA

Thanks to the generous support of Marshall Cavendish, NMRT is able to offer three tickets to the Newbery/Caldecott/Wilder Banquet at the ALA 2008 Annual Conference in Anaheim, CA. Tickets are $89 each, which would be out of the financial reach of most NMRT members if it weren't for the generosity of Marshall Cavendish.

Any NMRT member who is not currently serving on the Marshall Cavendish Award Committee may enter. Just write a short essay (around 250 words) telling us why you want to attend the Newbery/Caldecott/Wilder Banquet and how you feel you would benefit. For more information about Newbery, Caldecott and Wilder honorees, go to http://www.ala.org/ala/alsc/awardsscholarships/literaryawds/literaryrelated.htm

THE BANQUET

Newbery-Caldecott Awards Banquet, Sunday, June 29, 6:00 pm – 11:00 pm
Join us for this gala evening to celebrate the Newbery and Caldecott Medalists and Honorees, authors and illustrators of the year’s most distinguished books for children. Cocktails (cash bar) available prior to dinner; doors open at 6:45 pm. Tickets are $89 and will be available at the Online Registration Counter until the event is sold out, or noon Friday, whichever occurs first. No tickets will be available at the door.

TO SUBMIT AN ENTRY

More Parents Outraged Over School Library Books

If you're like me (and you know you want to be) you know what's best for children. Not just your children, but all children. Here's some more good folks just like me.

Parents: 'Burn Journals' Too Hot For School: Some parents in Lake County are complaining about a book they claim is too racy to be on the shelves of school libraries.

Mom says there's "filth" on school shelves: "The Rain God" The pages are laced with profanity and references to sex... too graphic to be read on TV... and encouraged intolerance and hate.

Hawaii Library Reinforces Time To Read With Your Children

Even in this island paradise, it's important to make time for reading...and turn off the TV sometimes.

More than 250 parents and children crowded into Kualapu’u Elementary School’s cafeteria to participate in the final session of the Read Aloud Program (RAP) on Thursday. Jed Gaines, founder of Read Aloud America in Hawaii, hosted the event. This is RAP’s second year on Molokai; the program consisted of six sessions and has helped to improve the quality of family life in the community.

Claudette Ka’ahanui regularly attended RAP and said her children have started reading much more. “It’s unbelievable what this program has done for my kids,” she said.

Ka’ahanui said RAP has encouraged her to read to her children. “I never did,” she said, adding she often found herself too busy with work. “This has really brought me to realize that I need to make time. You have to fit it into your schedule, whether you’re working or not. It’s only to benefit the kids,” she said.

Another parent, Amethyst Tuisamatatele, brings seven of her children to RAP sessions. Tuisamatatele said she hardly went to the library, but because of RAP, she now pays a visit at least once a week. She said a big change in her family is the recent restriction of the television, which has resulted in her children finding more productive activities to participate in.

It's Children's Book Week!

It's Children's Book Week, and happily, the library in Salinas (CA) and many others are open to celebrate the event and encourage kids to read.

One way of celebrating Children's Book Week (today through Sunday) with your child is by adding an extra book or two to the family library. Here are a few suggestions you might wish to consider: "Eco Babies Wear Green", "Doctor Ted", "The House That Max Built", "Human Body" and "MYTHOLOGICAL CREATURES A Classical Bestiary".

And from another part of the great state of California, suggestions from Mercury News, which include: ""Little Night/Nochecita", "In a Blue Room" and "The Day We Danced in Underpants."

Is your library doing special to celebrate? Clue us in...

And Tango Makes the List Again...Two Years in a Row of Objections

A children's story about a family of penguins with two fathers once again tops the list of library books the public objects to the most.

"And Tango Makes Three," released in 2005 and co-written by Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell, was the most "challenged" book in public schools and libraries for the second straight year, according to the American Library Association. AP reports.

Rowling Keeps Company With Seuss, Blume and Steinbeck

The Washington Post repints a portion of The Renaissance Learning report "What Kids Are Reading"; the books most read by more than 3 million schoolchildren last year. From 'Green Eggs and Ham' to 'To Kill a Mockingbird'...info on grades 1 through 12.

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Books that traumatized you as a child

Peter Hartlaub thinks the books that we were exposed to as children were even more scary than some of the movies. Beatrix Potter is based in a world where rabbits constantly live in fear of getting eaten. And we won't even get into the screwed up universe of the Grimm Fairy Tales, which is basically like a "Saw" movie without Donnie Wahlberg...

Are Kids at Your Library Batty About Books?

A kid's program that's sure to please is taking place at the Liverpool (UK) Library; Snakes, exotic animals and fearsome pirates are taking over Liverpool Central Library this Saturday May 3 when a special program, "Batty About Books" is scheduled.

News from the city council and a reminder that "children will even have the chance to make their own twirly, whirly snake to take home."

Successful "Battle of the Books" Kid's Quiz Program May End Due to Funding Loss

Tampa Bay Online reports on what might be the end of an era.

Dressed in regal, navy blue "Battle of The Books" T-shirts, the elementary school students sat onstage on the edge of their seats in proper "game show" style Thursday, poised and ready to pounce on their buzzers with the correct answer.

Adrenaline pumping, they conferred with teammates and answered tough book questions with ease, such as, "In what book was there a note that said, 'I'm here on a dare, don't tell?'" and "What author had a character that spoke Albanian?"

Thursday night, students from Spring Hill's Westside Elementary School and Parrott Middle School won the Hernando County School District's annual Battle of the Books competition, held in the gymnasium of Challenger K-8 School of Science and Mathematics in Spring Hill. The 13-year-old competition is part of a statewide reading initiative in which students in grades 3-8 read up to 15 books in The Sunshine State Young Reader's Award Program, selected based on their appeal, literary value, curriculum connections and diversity.

Oregon ACLU Joins Booksellers in Condemning Sexual Materials Law

The American Civil Liberties Union of Oregon has joined booksellers and librarians in the state to challenge a state law restricting the sale or provision of sexually explicit material to children, saying it could affect constitutionally protected material.

The ACLU says the law approved by the 2007 Legislature is vague and could result in parents being charged for providing educational books to their children - or even an older child who gives material to a younger sibling.

As an example, the ACLU cited the 1975 novel "Forever" by Judy Blume, a frequent target of censors because it deals with teenage sexuality. "A 17-year-old girl who lends her 13-year-old sister a copy of the book and tells her to 'read the good parts' could be arrested and prosecuted," said Dave Fidanque, ACLU executive director for Oregon.

"For booksellers, the new law is vague and difficult to apply," Michael Powell, owner of Powell's Books, said in a news release. "It says a 13-year-old can legally buy these books, but it's a crime to sell them to a 12-year-old. How do I 'card' a 12-year old?"

The law was passed by the 2007 Legislature and signed by Gov. Ted Kulongoski. Story from kcby CBS as well as oregonlive.

Oregon ACLU Joins ABFFE in Condemning Sexual Material Law

The American Civil Liberties Union of Oregon has joined booksellers in the state to challenge a state law restricting the sale or provision of sexually explicit material to children, saying it could affect constitutionally protected material.

The ACLU says the law approved by the 2007 Legislature is vague and could result in parents being charged for providing educational books to their children - or even an older child who gives material to a younger sibling.

As an example, the ACLU cited the 1975 novel "Forever" by Judy Blume, a frequent target of censors because it deals with teenage sexuality. "A 17-year-old girl who lends her 13-year-old sister a copy of the book and tells her to 'read the good parts' could be arrested and prosecuted," said Dave Fidanque, ACLU executive director for Oregon. Story from kcby CBS.

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