Filtering

Filtering

Porn at libraries: Morris official's advice isn't an ethics violation, state says

An ethics complaint by a self-described "library watchdog" alleging a prominent Morris County official misled local libraries, telling them they have to allow pornography on publicly accessible computers, has been dismissed.

In the complaint, Dan Kleinman, who runs SafeLibraries.Blogspot.com, said Ann Grossi "has materially mislead the communities of Roxbury and Montville into allowing pornography in the public libraries, despite community desires to remove it and despite the law."

http://www.nj.com/morris/index.ssf/2014/01/porn_at_libraries_attorneys_advice_isnt_an_ethics...

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How mobile networks are policing the web - badly

How mobile networks are policing the web — badly
While the British government considers forcing internet providers to censor the web, it turns out that many European mobile operators are happily acting as censors themselves already — and mistakenly blocking lots of legitimate sites along the way.

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Don't regulate the net - regulate your kids

Worried about online porn? Don't regulate the net – regulate your kids
"They don't need legislation; they don't need complicated filters that will be routed around in a flash (try a search on "VPN filter evade"); they just need to be part of the family. You can't turn off the internet, nor make its denizens respectable (ask Louise Mensch). You can, however, turn off the computer, or explain respectability to your child."

Washington library wins suit to leave filters on

Washington library wins suit; it can filter porn
A rural Eastern Washington library system may continue to filter the Internet to block porn and gambling sites, a federal court judge ruled Tuesday.

Judge Edward Shea of the Eastern Washington Federal District Court ruled that the North Central Regional Library (NCRL) is not violating the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution by filtering some adult Internet content on library computers.

The lawsuit was brought by the ACLU of Seattle which argued that the library’s filtering was overly broad and illegally censored material based on content.

SOPA & Protect IP Act Tabled...For Now...

Multiple outlets are reporting that the Stop Online Piracy Act and the Protect IP Act proposals are currently tabled. British tech publication The Register notes that this does not mean the bills are dead. The Editor-in-Chief of Mashable, Lance Ulanoff, tweeted asking what ideas people had about copyright protection, intellectual property, and piracy. Todd Wasserman of Mashable calls SOPA dead instead of tabled. A statement issued by the office of Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid notes his belief that the issues raised over the Protect IP Act can be resolved. CNET blogger Don Reisinger notes that the bills are hardly dead and that while a battle was lost a war continues. Nate Anderson at Ars Technica reports that Senator Ron Wyden of Oregon, a major opponent of the Protect IP Act, claiming that Internet policy should not be made on the fly.

Library computers can block porn but Wicca? ACLU says no

Library computers can block porn—but Wicca? ACLU says no
The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) has just filed a complaint (PDF) on behalf of a Salem, Missouri resident named Anaka Hunter, who contends that the Salem public library is unconstitutionally blocking her ability to access information on "minority" religious views. Federal and state law both govern libraries in Missouri, which are generally ordered to block access to obscene online material and child pornography. But the Salem library allegedly goes far beyond the mandate.

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Killing It With Legislation, Not Force

Rik Myslewski reports in The Register that Wikipedia is looking at a possible upcoming blackout. Declan McCullagh at CNET notes that this is part of a possible protest response to the proposed Stop Online Piracy Act being debated by the United States Congress that has potential extraterritorial effects. Meanwhile, The Hill reports that Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt characterizes SOPA as criminalizing the fundamental structure of the Web and all its interlinked nature.

"It’s not law — it’s a kind of thuggery"

David Post over at the lawprof blog The Volokh Conspiracy writes about the Stop Online Piracy Act and some of the disturbing consequences if it were enacted in the United States. Any library, and if appropriate their parent organization, should consider the consequences Post outlines if that library provides Internet to users let alone staff.

Homeless Men Caught Watching Porn at CA Library

Homeless Men Caught Watching Porn at CA Library
Laguna Beach Public Library patrons say there's a big problem with homeless people watching porn on library computers. Police found eight homeless men gathered around a computer inside the library Saturday afternoon watching pornography. One was arrested for allegedly fondling himself.

Idaho Libraries to adjust to new Internet filtering law

Idaho Libraries to adjust to new Internet filtering law
But the Coeur d’Alene library, like every other library in the state, will have to change its system between now and October, under a new law enacted by the Idaho Legislature this year.

Although the new law is a scaled-back version of the original proposal — which would have required libraries to filter Internet access for everyone — it’s still a concern to some library officials. Currently, every library in Idaho handles the issue its own way, with some choosing to install filters on all their Internet-accessible computers, others choosing to filter just some, and some leaving the choice to parents and adult library patrons. That local control works well, Ammons and others say, noting that Idaho libraries don’t get any state funding. Libraries are supported by local property taxes and governed by local boards.

Under the new law, Internet use by children must be filtered.

Biggest four UK ISPs switching to 'opt-in' system for pornography

Biggest four UK ISPs switching to 'opt-in' system for pornography
Subscribers to four of the UK's biggest internet service providers will have to "opt in" if they want to view sexually explicit websites, as part of government-sponsored curbs on online pornography.

The measures will be unveiled on Tuesday as David Cameron hosts No 10 meeting with the Mothers' Union, which earlier this year produced a raft of proposals to shield children from sexualised imagery.

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NY Post Shocked To Learn People Look At Boobies In The Library

City libraries say 'checking out' porn protected by First Amendment:
Approached by The Post, the dirty old man skulked away, saying, "I don't want to talk to you. Leave me alone." Under US law, all libraries that take federal funding only must install filters on publicly used computers to block content containing illegal obscenity and child pornography, and New York City officials say they comply to the letter.

Library solves porn problem by moving computers

Library solves porn problem by moving computers
If you want to keep your kid from looking at inappropriate stuff on the Internet, keep the computer in the middle of the home's high-traffic area — the living room. Barring filtering software, it's the obvious lo-fi solution. That doesn't work in libraries however, where adults who want to look at pornography in public often have no shame.

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What to say when you are told that you work in a bad library because you filter the Internet:

"We support the guidelines outlined in the American Library Association's Office of Intellectual Freedom regarding internet filters, but we also listened to our library patrons who were concerned with how pornographic images were displayed on library computer screens.

We received complaints about images of nude women and women engaged in sex acts. Library patrons felt that these images sexualized women and created an unfair and unwelcoming environment. Women in particular felt threatened by these images.

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Library of Congress Blocks Wikileaks

From The Guardian:

The Library of Congress tonight joined the education department, the commerce department and other government agencies in confirming that the ban is in place.

Although thousands of leaked cables are freely available on the Guardian, New York Times and other newspaper websites, as well as the WikiLeaks site, the Obama administration insists they are still classified and, as such, have to be protected.

Access in the Hands of an Aggressive Filtering Policy

In the November 1st issue of Library Journal, there is an LJ Backtalk article entitled “The Internet is Not All or Nothing”. It is written by Dean Marney, the Director of the North Central Regional Library in Wenatchee, Washington. This is probably not going to ignite any immediate recognition for some readers but this is the library at the heart of Bradburn v. North Central Regional Library District lawsuit. (If you are familiar with the lawsuit, you can skip on down to the break below and avoid all this legal background stuff.) It was the first case in the post-CIPA United State et al. v. American Library Association ruling which held that Children’s Internet Protection Act was not unconstitutional.

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Time for Filtering at Greensboro NC Library

Using public library computers to search the Internet for inappropriate material soon may be a little more difficult.

The Greensboro Public Library board of trustees voted Monday to ask the City Council to consider adding software to filter inappropriate material from Internet searches. The filter would be limited to computers designated for use by children, as well as for users ages 17 and younger, and for adults who want filtered searches.

That is the less restrictive of two options city library Director Sandy Neerman proposed to trustees at their meeting Monday. The other proposal would have filtered all Internet searches by users of any age.

A filter — whether wholesale or tiered as the library trustees recommend — would become part of the library system’s overall computer-management system, she said. The library operates 230 public computers with Internet access, 105 of them at Central Library.

Article from the News-Record also lists patron infractions during the first six months of the year (sleeping was the number one no-no).

Foolproof Porn Filter

Check out the hilarious picture at "<a href="http://www.swissarmylibrarian.net/2010/06/15/foolproof-porn-filter" target="_blank">Foolproof Porn Filter</a>," by <b>Brian Herzog</b>, <em>Swiss Army Librarian</em>, 15 June 2010.

Washington Supreme Court Approves Use of Library Internet Filters

Public libraries, in theory, are supposed to be bastions of information. But with the rise of the Internet, many libraries have begun putting up online filters, to make sure users are using public broadband connections to search for actual information and not, well, porn. To many, it's a practical measure. But is it constitutional? According to the Washington state Supreme Court, it is.

Full article here

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