Information Architecture

Information Architecture

Another paywall

YouTube Is Said to Plan a Subscription Option

Newspapers have digital subscriptions. Record labels have iTunes and Spotify. And YouTube is about to have special programming for paying customers.

This week YouTube, the world’s largest video Web site, will announce a plan to let some video makers charge a monthly subscription to their channels. There will be paid channels for children’s programming, entertainment, music and many other topic areas, according to people with knowledge of the plan, who spoke on condition of anonymity because they had been asked by YouTube not to comment publicly yet. Some of the channels — there will be several dozen at the outset — will cost as little as $1.99 a month.

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A national digital library endowment

A national digital library endowment: More details, an FAQ, and an invitation to librarians and others to help shape the proposal

Full piece here

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #237

This week's program starts off with a brief essay talking about the disintegration of having a coherent "popular culture" in the United States then turns to the strange case of the Harlem Shake in Oxford. After that the episode wraps up with a news miscellany.

Related links:

Download here (MP3) (Ogg Vorbis) (Free Lossless Audio Codec), or subscribe to the podcast (MP3) to have episodes delivered to your media player. We suggest subscribing by way of a service like gpodder.net. Operational support items can be purchased for the Air Staff here via Amazon.

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/.

The 'Big Data' Revolution: How Number Crunchers Can Predict Our Lives

Companies and governments have access to an unprecedented amount of digital information, much of it personal: what we buy, what we search for, what we read online. Kenneth Cukier, co-author of the book Big Data, describes how data-crunching is becoming the new norm.

Full piece on NPR

Link to book: Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work, and Think

Regional High librarian eyes ditching Dewey Decimal System for new classification

Books about homosexuality are on the same shelf as books on incest and prostitution.

Homer's "Iliad" is in the nonfiction section.

The works of Shakespeare and books on Elizabethan culture are nowhere near each other.

"I think it's troubling," said Jeff Aubuchon, the librarian at Oakmont Regional High School. "I'm worried about the message that sends."

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Shall I Encode Thee? Sonnets Stored On Double Helix

The world is full of data — and that's a problem. We have to find a place to store all those digital photos, tax records and unfinished novels. British scientists have demonstrated a possible solution: They've stored all of Shakespeare's sonnets on several small stretches of DNA.

Full piece

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #229

This week's episode looks around the LISHost galaxy while looking at some ambiguous information in a speculative manner.

Related links:

Download here (MP3) (Ogg Vorbis), or subscribe to the podcast (MP3) to have episodes delivered to your media player. We suggest subscribing by way of a service like gpodder.net. A way to send gifts of replacement hardware to Erie Looking Productions is available here via Amazon, as always.

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/.

What Should We Be Worried About In 2013?

NPR had a piece that was titled - What Should We Be Worried About In 2013?

Some of the discussion is about information literacy.

Excerpt:
Many worried about the impact of technology on individual minds and human relationships. My own entry was among them, raising the concern that fast and efficient access to information isn't always better access to information. Thanks to features of human psychology, effortless information retrieval can engender illusions of knowledge and understanding.

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LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #228

This week's program deals with Wikipedia hoaxing, an Internet icon, and a miscellany of brief items.

Related links:

Download here (MP3) (Ogg Vorbis), or subscribe to the podcast (MP3) to have episodes delivered to your media player. We suggest subscribing by way of a service like gpodder.net. The list of hardware sought to replace our ever-increasing damage control report can be found here and can be directly purchased and sent to assist The Air Staff in rebuilding to a more normal operations capability.

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/.

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #227

The tag line for this week's episode: "Information As Weapon"

We've got a bit of an essay talking about that in connection with an awful case in Ohio. Information might want to be free, but couldn't it also be used as a weapon?

There's no miscellany this week as we thought that that would be enough to consider within the realm of preserving the knowledge ecology.

Related links:

Download here (MP3) (Ogg Vorbis), or subscribe to the podcast (MP3) to have episodes delivered to your media player. We suggest subscribing by way of a service like gpodder.net.

There is an opportunity available to purchase material goods to replace some of the hardware that has died at Erie Looking Productions over the past three weeks.

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/.

The Joint New Year's Eve Special

In concert with the team behind the Ubuntu UK Podcast, the Air Staff at Erie Looking Productions presented via WBCQ a New Year's Eve special broadcast via shortwave radio. Now that the show has finished being broadcast, it is being made available for download.

Download here (MP3). You can subscribe to the podcast (MP3) to have episodes delivered to your media player. We suggest subscribing by way of a service like gpodder.net. Stephen's shopping list of items to replace hardware damaged and destroyed due to adverse circumstances over the past week, which includes requiring replacement of our dead in-house server with a lower-powered Raspberry Pi at this point, can be found here where direct purchasing is possible to send the items directly to the Air Staff.

Creative Commons License
The Joint New Year's Eve Special produced by Gloria Kellat of the Air Staff of Erie Looking Productions is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #223

This week's program has not one but two features from the United States Department of Agriculture that may prove useful to reference librarians and selectors. In the essay we talk about the World Conference on International Telecommunications 2012 and how it may bode ill for the Internet not to mention that NPR reports about such as well.

Related links:

Download here (MP3) (Ogg Vorbis), or subscribe to the podcast (MP3) to have episodes delivered to your media player. We suggest subscribing by way of a service like gpodder.net. Stephen's Silly Summation of Christmas Wishes can be found here via Amazon, as always.

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/.

Apple patents the virtual page turn

Apple is now the proud owner of the page turn.
In a patent approved this week by the United States Patent Office Apple was awarded a design patent for

"Display screen or portion thereof with animated graphical user interface."

Full article at CNN.com

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #216

This week's episode mysteriously dispenses with Profile America so that attention can be paid to the matter of Diplomats Dancing in Dubai in December...which is to say, we talk about some ramifications of the upcoming World Conference on International Telecommunications.

Related links:

Download here (MP3) (Ogg Vorbis), or subscribe to the podcast (MP3) to have episodes delivered to your media player. We suggest subscribing by way of a service like gpodder.net. Support and subsistence items for the production team can be purchased and sent from here via Amazon, as always.

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/.

Wikipedia Policies Limit Editing Haymarket Bombing

NPR piece about a professor trying to edit an entry on the 1886 Haymarket Square riot in Chicago.

Here is the Wikipedia entry.

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #205

This week we talk about preparedness in light of a major part of the "public cloud" being taken offline by a meteorological event, proceed with a news miscellany, and have a curious statement from Madam Producer. Direct Download Link: Ogg Vorbis Audio To assist the air staff in covering costs after one member of the crew took not just a pay cut but also an hours cut at their day job, an Amazon list is established here where bulk food items can be purchased and sent to them. A particular newspaper also shows up on the list. Related Links: Reuters: Deadly storms leave millions without power in eastern U.S WKYC: Ohio--State of Emergency, nearly million no power The Ohio News Network: Federal Assistance Coming To Ohio The Register: Amazon cloud knocked out by violent storms in Virginia -- Mother Nature huffs and puffs a derecho The PCMag Digital Network: Netflix, Instagram, Pinterest Restore Services Following Outage Benjamin Kerensa: Reflecting on Netflix, Instagram, Pinterest Downtime Voices for the Library: Public Lending Right and volunteer libraries New York Times: Sweeping Effects as Broadband Moves to Meters The PCMag Digital Network: Minitel R.I.P. (1982-2012) France24: Nation bids 'adieu' to 'French Internet' code4lib: Tools for Reducing and Managing Link Rot in LibGuides The PCMag Digital Network: Farewell Laptop? Mobile Internet Use Jumps France24: Americans moving to mobile Internet: survey Radio Survivor: Ira Glass says stations should junk recycled Car Talk Michael Geist: UNESCO's 2012 Paris OER Declaration PDF of the UNESCO declaration on Open Educational Resources The Register: Gouged by cloud - but it's so convenient Social Science Research Network: Does the Taxing Clause Give Congress Unlimited Power?

Creative Commons License

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #205 by The Air Staff of Erie Looking Productions is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

Scientific Retractions on the Rise

When a paper released by a scientific journal turns out to be wrong, either due to human error or intentional fraud , the journal’s editors often will issue a retraction advising scientists to disregard the research. A Wall Street Journal study has found the number of such retractions to be soaring. New Yorker science writer Jonah Lehrer tells Brooke what he thinks is going on.

Retraction Watch

There's often a really interesting story behind a retraction. That's what Ivan Oransky told us. He's a doctor and journalist and founder, along with Adam Marcus, of a blog called Retraction Watch. They monitor scientific journals and investigate why articles were retracted. They uncovered serious ethical breaches at a variety of journals. Oransky tells Brooke about some of the stories he's covered this year.

 

 

Proposed New York State Ban On Anonymous Posts

Troves of Personal Data, Forbidden to Researchers

When scientists publish their research, they also make the underlying data available so the results can be verified by other scientists.

At least that is how the system is supposed to work. But lately social scientists have come up against an exception that is, true to its name, huge.

It is “big data,” the vast sets of information gathered by researchers at companies like Facebook, Google and Microsoft from patterns of cellphone calls, text messages and Internet clicks by millions of users around the world. Companies often refuse to make such information public, sometimes for competitive reasons and sometimes to protect customers’ privacy. But to many scientists, the practice is an invitation to bad science, secrecy and even potential fraud.

The issue came to a boil last month at a scientific conference in Lyon, France, when three scientists from Google and the University of Cambridge declined to release data they had compiled for a paper on the popularity of YouTube videos in different countries.

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