Intellectual Property

Intellectual Property

Why Can\'t Johnny Respect Copyrights?

Submitted by Ryan on Mon, 07/16/2001 - 16:09

Interesting piece from Salon on plans by the British government to inculcate school children with a respect for copyright law:

If members of the U.K.\'s Creative Industries Task Force have their way, British teenagers will soon be cramming for tests on intellectual property law and the legal implications of file-sharing. Schoolkids who download illicit MP3 files, cut and paste newspaper articles or e-mail them, or exchange JPEG files of Britney Spears will learn the error of their ways -- at least according to the copyright officials.

Thanks to Slashdot.

Consumer Rights Change When Copyrighted Works Go Digital

Submitted by Ieleen on Wed, 07/11/2001 - 10:04

For The Florida Times Union, Anick Jesdanun writes...

\"When you buy a book or a video cassette, you can lend it to a friend, sell it on eBay, even toss it in the trash. Or you can keep it to read or watch again and again. It\'s all legal under the \'\'first-sale doctrine\'\' of U.S. copyright law, the provision that allows libraries to exist. But your rights shrink when you\'re dealing with an electronic book or a movie downloaded from the Internet. [more...]
For a related story, \"Behind Digital Copyright, Click Here.

Temptation Plagiarism

Submitted by Ieleen on Thu, 07/05/2001 - 14:36

From the Associated Press, via CNet News, someone writes... \"Before her students write term papers, Melanie Hazen makes sure they understand one small thing: You can\'t put your name on someone else\'s work. Still, they don\'t see the harm in borrowing from a Web site. ``Taking something straight off the Internet and using it as their own, they don\'t seem to think that\'s stealing at all,\'\' said Hazen, an English teacher at Montgomery Central High School in Clarksville, Tenn.

Post-Tasini: Pity the Librarians

Submitted by Ieleen on Fri, 06/29/2001 - 09:49

Kendra Mayfield writes...
\"For publishers reeling from a recent Supreme Court loss, it\'s time to pay freelancers whose work has been republished in electronic databases without their permission. But rather than pay up or face billions in liabilities, publishers are deleting tens of thousands of freelance articles spanning decades. So who will bear the brunt of that extra work? The librarians, of course.\" [more...] from Wired.

Copyright Victory Could be a Catch 22 for Freelance Writers

Submitted by Ieleen on Thu, 06/28/2001 - 17:01

Wired reports today that the recent victory for freelance writers may not be so great afterall. According to the article, \"A major problem for writers is that many publishers, anticipating a loss in the Tasini case, have begun demanding that freelancers sign away all rights to their articles, including electronic rights, for no additional payment,\" said freelance writer Miriam Raftery in an e-mail. This sign-or-else mentality forces freelancers to choose between short-term survival and long-term stability.\" [more...]

Limited Copyright Exemption for Distance Learning Doesn\'t Include Libraries

Submitted by Ieleen on Thu, 06/28/2001 - 16:40

Brian Krebs writes...
\"Legislation that would provide a limited copyright exemption for distance learning received a cozy reception from a House Judiciary subcommittee and its panelists today. The bill, S. 487, unanimously passed the Senate in a voice vote earlier this month, but only after a lengthy standoff between educational groups and the publishing industry...another bill would have extended the same exemptions to not-for-profit libraries, a possibility that was rejected during discussions on the bill in the Senate.\"
[more...] from NewsBytes.