Intellectual Property

Intellectual Property

New Media Alliance Strikes Out at Content Providers Over Copyright

Submitted by infoneer on Thu, 08/02/2007 - 15:30

The Computer and Communications Industry Association (members include Google, Microsoft, Yahoo!) has accused content providers such as the National Football League, Major League Baseball, Harcourt, Penguin, Dreamworks, and NBC of "systematic misrepresentation of consumers' rights to use legally acquired content." The complaint to the Federal Trade Commission seeks better copyright notices that more accurately depict the rights of consumers with regard to fair use.

From The New York Times.

Lawrence Lessig on iBookWatch

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Mon, 06/25/2007 - 16:22

Lawrence Lessig, author of Code 2.0 and Free Culture: The Nature and Future of Creativity gives a talk to Google employees. He discusses numerous ideas that will be of interest to librarians. The presentation includes a discussion of the dicotomy of a read only culture versus a read/write culture. Even if you have heard Lessig speak before this presentation is particularly informative.

Fan Archive Planned for Preserving Fan Fiction

Submitted by Arwen Spicer on Thu, 06/14/2007 - 22:54

In response to dissatisfaction with FanLib.com's model for bringing fan fiction into the mainstream, members of the fan fiction community, especially on LiveJournal, have launched Fan Archive, a project for archiving and cataloging fan fiction from multiple fandoms for easy searchability and long-term preservation.

Police Arrest Polish Subtitlers

Submitted by Arwen Spicer on Tue, 05/29/2007 - 06:10

At least six Polish translators have been arrested for illegally subtitling foreign films that have no licensed Polish translation. Because the translations are not commercial, they might fall under fair use. However, concerns that the free distribution of such films online might undermine legitimate sales has prompted a crackdown on distributors and downloaders in Poland and worldwide. The Polish translators, affiliated with the popular translation site, napisy.org, may face up to two years in prison if convicted of illegally distributing copyrighted material.