Intellectual Property

Intellectual Property

US court grants Elsevier millions in damages from Sci-Hub

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Fri, 06/23/2017 - 13:14
One of the world’s largest science publishers, Elsevier, won a default legal judgement on 21 June against websites that provide illicit access to tens of millions of research papers and books. A New York district court awarded Elsevier US$15 million in damages for copyright infringement by Sci-Hub, the Library of Genesis (LibGen) project and related sites.

Full article at Nature.com

Cooking for Copyright campaign sees librarians make vintage recipes in bid to change laws

Submitted by Pete on Thu, 07/30/2015 - 09:16

Librarians down under are cooking up a campaign to change the country's copyright laws according to this ABC story.

"However, those involved want people to bake biscuits and cakes rather than picket Parliament.

Social media users are being encouraged to cook a vintage recipe and share a photo of the result.

What Does It Mean That James Bond's In the Public Domain In Canada?

Submitted by Pete on Thu, 01/08/2015 - 09:05

io9 looks at the copyright status of James Bond:

"On January 1st, 2015, the works of Ian Fleming entered the public domain in a number of countries. That means that the character of James Bond is no longer copyrighted in those countries, just like Sherlock Holmes has been for a while. But it doesn't mean that it's suddenly open season on that character.

But why now and what exactly does it mean?"

Picking The Locks: Redefining Copyright Law In The Digital Age

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Mon, 11/03/2014 - 22:08

Information wants to be free. At least that's what Internet activists and many consumers say in support of free online content.

But when we stream a new film online or listen to music on Spotify, we don't always consider — or care about — the artists who are losing out.

The debates over intellectual property, copyright and traditional ideas of enforcement have been hot topics of late. The fall of Napster in the late '90s and the current battle between publisher Hachette and Amazon show that copyright law needs to be rewritten to fit digital standards.

The Copyright Wars: Three Centuries of Trans-Atlantic Battle

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Thu, 10/09/2014 - 23:13

The Copyright Wars: Three Centuries of Trans-Atlantic Battle

Today's copyright wars can seem unprecedented. Sparked by the digital revolution that has made copyright--and its violation--a part of everyday life, fights over intellectual property have pitted creators, Hollywood, and governments against consumers, pirates, Silicon Valley, and open-access advocates. But while the digital generation can be forgiven for thinking the dispute between, for example, the publishing industry and Google is completely new, the copyright wars in fact stretch back three centuries--and their history is essential to understanding today's battles. The Copyright Wars--the first major trans-Atlantic history of copyright from its origins to today--tells this important story.

Sherlock Holmes Is in the Public Domain, American Judge Rules

Submitted by Pete on Fri, 12/27/2013 - 11:31

This New York Times story has the details.

"A federal judge has issued a declarative judgment stating that Holmes, Watson, 221B Baker Street, the dastardly Professor Moriarty and other elements included in the 50 Holmes works Arthur Conan Doyle published before January 1, 1923, are no longer covered by United States copyright law, and can be freely used by new creators without paying any licensing fee to the Conan Doyle estate."

Google Gets Total Victory Over Authors Guild: Book Scanning Is Fair Use

Submitted by Pete on Thu, 11/14/2013 - 15:54

This one has been a long time coming, but this morning, Judge Denny Chin (who actually has a long history of siding with copyright holders) found that Google's book scanning project is fair use. This is a huge victory in a variety of ways. TechDirt has the story.

Mendeley and RefWorks Flow: The next, next generation of citation management software

Submitted by John on Mon, 07/15/2013 - 10:40

A decade or so ago, ISI's EndNote bought out most of the competition, practically obtaining a monopoly on the reference manager business. In the early Library 2.0 boom, web-based products like Zotero and CSA's RefWorks became the norm. Thomson Reuters played catch up by introducing EndNote Web, and NoodleBib and other adware/freemium clones cropped up in what is now again a crowded marketplace.

How Copyright Makes Works Disappear . . .

Submitted by Blake Carver (not verified) on Sat, 07/06/2013 - 16:27

An excellent new study at http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2290181 looks at a random sample of new books for sale on Amazon.com shows three times more books initially published in the 1850’s are for sale than new books from the 1950’s. Why? The paper presents new data on how copyright seems to make works disappear. First, a random sample of 2300 new books for sale on Amazon.com is analyzed along with a random sample of 2000 songs available on new DVD’s.