Journals & Magazines

Journals & Magazines

More on Due Date Stamps

After a story earlier this week about Due Date stamps, Florida's own effing-librarian wrote to Washington Post columnist John Kelly with his thoughts.

Kelly added most of effing's email to his follow-up column, "Okay, So End of Library Stamps Isn't the End of the World.". Effing's stuff is found here fyi, along with opinions from other readers. Isn't it nice when you can start a dialogue?

Special Issues 19(1) published

<i>Special Issues: Bulletin of the Canadian Association of Special Libraries and Information Services</i> has published its <a href="http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=CASLIS_special_issues">latest issue</a>. <b>Features</b> <em>Membership Does Have Its Benefits: Student Experiences with CASLIS</em> Seven students and new professionals discuss how being involved with CASLIS has benefitted them By Jennifer Green <em>Gateway to Canada’s Immigration Stories</em> A profile of Pier 21’s Scotiabank Research Cent

New, Edgy and Free; LJ's Book Smack Newsletter

Want "high-impact reviews of street lit, genre fiction, graphic novels, audio, and DVDs, along with edgy RA, in-depth prepub info, and industry buzz" direct from seasoned library-type editors?

Then you'll want to sign up for Library Journal's new twice-monthly newsletter BOOK SMACK (where did they get that edgy edgy name??).
Here's where to subscribe.

ACLU challenges Cleveland Heights Schools over Removal of Nintendo Magazine from Library

A principal's decision to remove a magazine from a middle-school library has drawn criticism for the Cleveland Heights-University Heights school board from the American Civil Liberties Union.

The ACLU said the First Amendment was violated when Brian Sharosky, principal of Roxboro Middle School, confiscated the November issue of Nintendo Power magazine. The magazine covers the world of Nintendo video games, from previews and ratings to secret codes and short cuts.

"Literature should not be removed from a school library simply because one person may find it inappropriate," said Christine Link, ACLU of Ohio executive director, in a statement last week. She called for the board to "immediately order that the magazine be reinstated."

Sharosky deemed that particular issue unsuitable for students in grades six to eight because of a "violent figure" on the cover and content about a game that's rated for mature audiences, according to district spokesman Michael Dougherty

The librarian objected, maintaining that staff members -- including the principal -- are supposed to follow the policy for challenging a publication. That starts with submitting a form to the superintendent and ends with a decision by the school board.

Cites & Insights 9:5 available

Cites & Insights 9:5, April 2009, is now available.

The 32-page issue is PDF as usual, with HTML versions (such as they are) for each essay available via the links below.

The issue includes:
Making it Work Perspective: Thinking about Blogging: 1

Do comments make a blog a blog? Is the "blogosphere" imploding? Have conversations moved elsewhere? And some offhand notes about blogs as a median medium, in an "interesting sweet spot in a casual media hierarchy of length, thought and formality."

Perspective: Writing about Reading 2

Ignoring the Death of Serious Reading, which is as specious as the Death of Blogs, the Death of Print Media and even (in my opinion) the Sudden Death of Newspapers, we look at some other reading-related topics--Aliteracy and Online and Print Reading. A third topic somehow moved over into...

Library Access to Scholarship

The Death of Journals (Film at 11). That's the overall title, and no, I don't believe journals are nearing sudden death either...but the topics this time around do relate to journals: Are print journals obsolete? Should professional journals evolve into blogs?

Net Media: Beyond Wikipedia

Taxonomy upgrade extras: 

New magazine is Mine.

<a href="http://tech.yahoo.com/news/ap/20090318/ap_on_hi_te/made_to_order_magazine">Time Inc. and Toyota Motor Corp., partnering on new customized print magazine</a>. You can choose content from 5 different publications (from a group of 8). The print edition will be available to the first 31,000 to request it; 200,000 more can get the online version. Could personalized content work in a print publication, or is just a waste of paper? <a href="http://www.timeinc.com/mine">Direct link to subscribe is here</a>. (I already requested my copy.)

Seattle P.I.'s Last Print Edition Out Tomorrow

The Seattle Post-Intelligencer newspaper will produce its last printed edition on Tuesday and become an Internet-only news source, the Hearst Corporation said on Monday, making it by far the largest American newspaper to take that leap. Thus ends a 146-year run.

But the P-I, as it is called, will resemble a local Huffington Post more than a traditional newspaper, with a news staff of about 20 people rather than the 165 it has had, and a site consisting mostly of commentary, advice and links to other news sites, along with some original reporting. NYTimes and video and commentary from the P.I. itself .

How To Save Newspapers

David Carr of the NYT imagines a secret meeting of top newspaper people complete with cigars and cognac. On the Agenda:

  • No more free content
  • No more free aggregators
  • No more commoditized ads.
  • Throw out the newspaper Preservation Act.

    United, newspapers may stand.

  • Cites & Insights 9:4 (March 2009) available

    Cites & Insights 9:4 (March 2009) is now available.

    The 30-page issue (PDF as usual, but there's an HTML version of the essay) consists of one essay:
    Perspective: The Google Books Search Settlement

    As an author with nine out of print books (to which I hold the rights): Great! I might see a couple hundred dollars...eventually. As one who cares about fair use: Boo! Google backed away from a case I thought they could win--and did so in a way that will make it harder for others in a similar situation. As a reader: Great--Google Books Search will continue to grow, and we'll see more than snippess from (some? most?) of five million out-of-print/in-copyright books. (As for "buying" such books, or rather, "permanent" online access to indifferently-scanned pages that can't be downloaded as PDFs and don't appear to have first-sale rights: Eh.) As a library supporter and user: Unclear--extremely unclear.

    We won't have final answers for a long time. Meanwhile, this issue reviews some of the summaries and commentaries, throwing in a fair amount of my own commentary.

    Barring truly unusual events, the April issue will have more than one essay, and almost certainly more than two.

    Taxonomy upgrade extras: 

    Wall Street Journal Librarian a Victim of Cutbacks

    The librarian who operates The Wall Street Journal's news research library -- which is set to close with the elimination of her job and another staffer's -- said in a memo to other librarians that the shutdown is both a personal difficulty and a hit to news coverage.

    "When I asked who will do research for the reporters, I was told, 'No one,'" the memo from Leslie A. Norman, posted on a librarian list serve last week, stated. "The reporters will probably be using a Lexis product called Due Diligence Dashboard (you know how your moms told you 'if you can't say something nice...')" Editor & Publishers reports.

    She later adds that it cannot replace the "knowledge about how to research using all the tricks we've learned over the years. We figure that the reporters will probably spend 10 times our compensation trying to do their own research."

    Cites & Insights 9:3 (February 2009) available

    Cites & Insights 9:3, February 2009, is now available for downloading.

    The 30-page issue is PDF, as usual. Three of the essays are available as HTML separates (using the links below). The first, which is also the longest, is available as a PDF separate--the inclusion of embedded Excel graphs within the document made HTML creation more cumbersome than I was willing to deal with.

    This issue features the article versions of my two presentations for the OLA (Ontario Library Association) SuperConference, held just over a week ago in Toronto, Ontario. The first article is a longer version of my session "Shiny Toys or Useful Tools?"; the second article includes "My own take" as the first set of Tech Trends, and that was my initial commentary during the "Top Tech Trends" session.

    Issue contents:
    Making it Work: Shiny Toys or Useful Tools? (pages 1-9)

    Blogs and wikis aren't shiny new toys for libraries and librarians any more. They've moved from toys to tools. This article includes the only defensible definitions of blogs and wikis that I know of, some comments about planning library blogs, and sections on the state of liblogs and library blogs in December 2008. Included--for the first time in C&I--graphs, eight of them. (As noted, the link is to a 9-page PDF.)

    Perspective: Tech Trends, Trends and Forecasts (pages 9-18)

    Taxonomy upgrade extras: 

    Google's Got All the Marbles

    Robert Darnton, head of the Harvard library system, writes in a lengthy article in the February 12th issue of the New York Review of Books:

    "Google will enjoy what can only be called a monopoly--a monopoly of a new kind, not of railroads or steel but of access to information. Google has no serious competitors. Google alone has the wealth to digitize on a massive scale. And having settled with the authors and publishers, it can exploit its financial power from within a protective legal barrier; for the class action suit covers the entire class of authors and publishers."

    He also discusses the economics of professional journals and how the system has changed over the past hundred years. A portion of his commentary:

    "The result stands out on the acquisitions budget of every research library: the Journal of Comparative Neurology now costs $25,910 for a year's subscription; Tetrahedron costs $17,969 (or $39,739, if bundled with related publications as a Tetrahedron package); the average price of a chemistry journal is $3,490; and the ripple effects have damaged intellectual life throughout the world of learning. Owing to the skyrocketing cost of serials, libraries that used to spend 50 percent of their acquisitions budget on monographs now spend 25 percent or less. University presses, which depend on sales to libraries, cannot cover their costs by publishing monographs. And young scholars who depend on publishing to advance their careers are now in danger of perishing."

    One of the Last Of the Few Sunday Newspaper Book Sections Will Soon Be Gone

    The Washington Post reported today that it plans to close its stand-alone magazine Book World as of mid-February.

    In dropping one of the few remaining stand-alone book sections in American newspapers, Executive Editor Marcus Brauchli said that the coverage will be shifted to the Style section and a revamped Outlook section. Shea said that The Post would publish about three-quarters of the roughly 900 reviews it has carried each year. The change will take effect Feb. 22.

    PW Lays Off Top Brass

    Sara Nelson, the editor in chief of Publishers Weekly, the main trade magazine for the book industry, has been laid off in a restructuring by the publication’s parent company, Reed Business Information.

    According to a statement from Reed, which operates a broad range of trade publications, the layoffs affect about 7 percent of the staff (including executive editor Daisy Maryles, bookselling editor Kevin Howell, children's reviews editor Elizabeth Devereaux and director of business development Rachel Dicker ...Shelf-Awareness) .

    As a result of the restructuring, Brian Kenney, editor in chief of School Library Journal, will now be editorial director of three magazines: Publishers Weekly, School Library Journal and Library Journal. NYTimes.

    Icfai University Journal of Library & Information Studies

    <strong> Icfai University Press (India) </strong> is a leader in academic and research publishing wishes to launch <b> the Icfai University Journal of Library & Information Studies </b> as a platform for the academia, information practitioners, and others concerned with the growth of the Library & Information Studies discipline.

    Cites & Insights Midwinter 2009 (9:2) available

    Cites & Insights 9:2, Midwinter 2009, is now available.

    The 34-page issue (PDF as usual) consists of either one essay or 132 essays, depending on your perspective:
    A was for AAC: A Discursive Glossary, Rethought and Expanded (1-34)

    That's right! Five years after the Midwinter 2004 issue, "A is for AAC: A Discursive Glossary," here it comes again, thanks to unanimous advice from those of you who chose to comment.

    For 97 entries (out of roughly 100 in the 2004 issue), I've repeated portions of the 2004 commentary (preceded by Then: ) and added new commentary (preceded by Now: ) as appropriate.

    Another 35 entries are wholly original to this issue (preceded by New: )

    It's a little longer than the 2004 edition (34 pages instead of 20). It's mostly new material (roughly 63% new text).

    Please don't print out the HTML version
    I've provided the whole thing in HTML--but for on-screen use only. Please, if you're going to print it out, use the PDF: My tests show that the HTML version will require 45 pages rather than 34.
    Next...

    Taxonomy upgrade extras: 

    Modern (and Raunchy) Swedish Bible Censored In US

    It wouldn't be the first time the Bible was censored.

    But it is probably the first time that the Bible has been published serially, in a sort of magazine format, with somewhat sexually explicit pictures. Then there was the homoerotica...

    Yeah, it should surprise no one that this didn't work out too well in the "land of the free."

    More from The Local.se.

    Declining U.S. Newspaper Circulation Potentially Signals Decline In Literacy

    Americans are doing less well than global competitors on a key index of literacy, according to a literacy survey by Central Connecticut State University.

    From All Headline News: This study attempts to capture one critical index of our nation's well-being -- the literacy of its major cities--by focusing on six key indicators of literacy: newspaper circulation, number of bookstores, library resources, periodical publishing resources, educational attainment, and Internet resources. The information is compared against population rates in each city to develop a per capita profile of the city's "long-term literacy"-a set of factors measuring the ways people use their literacy-and thus presents a large-scale portrait of our nation's cultural vitality," Dr. Jack Miller, CCSU President says.

    Cites & Insights 9:1 available

    Cites & Insights 9:1, January 2009, is now available.

    This 30-page issue (PDF, but each section is available in HTML form from the links below) includes:
    Bibs & Blather (pages 1-5)

    Announcing The Liblog Landscape 2007-2008 and an early-bird special ($22.50 through January 15, 2009). Also announcing Cites & Insights volume 8 in paperback form (a great way to show your support for C&I and my blog research)...and notes on other books and the start of a new volume.

    Net Media: Wikipedia Notes (pages 5-13)

    "Verifiability, not truth," Wikipedia's growing pains, the power of the editor and rise of the Wikicrats, and other notes on the messy reality of Wikipedia.

    Retrospective: Pointing with Pride Part 9 (pages 13-18)

    Solving the "missing issue" problem (oops) and ten notes from ten issues.

    Offtopic Perspective: 50 Movie Hollywood Legends, Part 2 (pages 18-26)

    Taxonomy upgrade extras: 

    Ebony and Jet Magazines Go Digital

    Ebony and Jet Magazines have joined the 21st Century (and Google), and have gone digital.

    According to the Chicago Tribune, prior to this deal, the magazine's have kept their past issues in bound volumes and on microfilm, so if anyone needed to look up an old article, librarians would have to search through the company's archives.

    However, with a new deal in place, both Ebony and Jet will be made searchable on the technology giant's growing database of publications. Johnson Publishing's partnership with Google gives readers access to more than nine magazine titles and 20 million photographs documenting 63 years, reports the paper.

    But, issues prior to 1960, they're having a problem with because of the issues' fragility or limited availability. So, the company is asking for help from their readers and librarians? "to pull stuff from the basement" to aid with the archiving.

    Pages

    Subscribe to RSS - Journals & Magazines