Authors

Authors

Shakespeare: Actor. Playwright. Social Climber.

The new depictions Ms. Wolfe has gathered are all from the 17th century. More than half associate the arms with “Shakespeare the player,” or with William, not John. This material not only proves “that Shakespeare was Shakespeare,” as Ms. Wolfe wryly put it. It also, she argues, underlines the degree to which contemporaries saw the coat of arms as, in effect, being for William. “It makes it abundantly clear that while Shakespeare was obtaining the arms on behalf of his father, it was really for his own status,” she said. Mr. Shapiro said he agreed. “All evidence suggests this was not about the father,” he said, “but about how Shakespeare wanted to be seen.”
From Shakespeare: Actor. Playwright. Social Climber. - NYTimes.com
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Was Roald Dahl the Best Children’s Author of All Time?

For one thing, he was ruthless. Or, if that’s too strong a word, let’s just say he did not coddle his readers, young or old (and as for what he wrote for grown-ups, he is surely the only successful children’s book author to ever get away with writing stories and novels for adults that are often, as my aunt would have said, prurient, and often just this side of pornographic).
From Was Roald Dahl the Best Children’s Author of All Time? - The Daily Beast
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Judy Blume And Kwame Alexander On The Books That Shape Childhood

From Superfudge to Summer Sisters, author Judy Blume’s books have defined the childhoods of generations of readers. Her newest book, In The Unlikely Event, is now out in paperback.  Listen to the full interview above. The podcast also includes a conversation with Newberry Award-winning writer Kwame Alexander, who crafts books for reluctant young readers.  This is a condensed and edited version of an interview with Nerdette hosts Tricia Bobeda and Greta Johnsen. 
From Judy Blume And Kwame Alexander On The Books That Shape Childhood | WBEZ
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With Bookshots, James Patterson thinks he’s invented the “Uber of books”

If short, face-paced novels don’t seem particularly novel, that could be because innovation in publishing doesn’t seem to resonate with readers. Profitable book and reading “disruption” hasn’t born out: Speed reading apps had a moment a few years ago, as did snack-themed ebooks, but neither has stuck. So perhaps Patterson would do best to call these what they are—short, fast reads. If his track record is any indication, he’s sure to sell books.
From With Bookshots, James Patterson thinks he’s invented the “Uber of books” — Quartz
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42 Douglas Adams quotes to live by

7. “All opinions are not equal. Some are a very great deal more robust, sophisticated and well supported in logic and argument than others.”
From BBC Radio 4 - Dangerous Visions - 42 Douglas Adams quotes to live by
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Sherman Alexie On His New Kids' Book ('Thunder Boy Jr.') And The Angst Of Being A 'Jr.' : NPR

Alexie tells NPR's David Greene that he found inspiration for the book in a surprising place: his own father's funeral. "As they lowered the coffin into the grave, his tombstone came into view and on the tombstone is Sherman Alexie — his name, my name," Alexie says. "And I'd always struggled with being named after him, but the existential weight of being named after your father really, really becomes clear when you're looking at a tombstone with your name on it."
From Sherman Alexie On His New Kids' Book ('Thunder Boy Jr.') And The Angst Of Being A 'Jr.' : NPR
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Celebrating the 200th birthday of Charlotte Brontë with some books from an unconventional childhood

This month marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of Charlotte Brontë, the third-born and longest lived of the six children of Patrick and Maria Brontë, and the author of the classic novels Jane Eyre (1847), Shirley (1849), Villette (1853) and The Professor (1857).  Much has been written about Charlotte and her famous 19th century literary family, and the mystique of their lives and legacy has been the subject of continuing interpretation and reinterpretation.  The Baillieu Library is very fortunate to hold some important early Brontë editions, together with copies of several titles which they are known to have read, if not devoured, as children.
From Reading with the young Charlotte: celebrating the 200th birthday of Charlotte Brontë with some books from an unconventional childhood – Library Collections
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An interview with Beverly Cleary about her inspiring books for children

She just turned 90, and her mental acuity is better than most people half her age. She said that she was a children's librarian in 1940 and got the idea to write kids' books when some boys at the library complained that they couldn't find any books "about kids like us." So she sat down and started writing stories about the kids she had had gotten to know at the library.
From An interview with Beverly Cleary about her inspiring books for children / Boing Boing
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Author Beverly Cleary turns 100 with wit, candour

As she turns 100, the feisty and witty author Beverly Cleary remembers the Oregon childhood that inspired the likes of characters Ramona and Beezus Quimby and Henry Huggins in the children's books that sold millions and enthralled generations of youngsters. "I was a well-behaved little girl, not that I wanted to be," she said. "At the age of Ramona, in those days, children played outside. We played hopscotch and jump rope and I loved them and always had scraped knees."
From Author Beverly Cleary turns 100 with wit, candour | Entertainment & Showbiz from CTV News
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Shakespeare’s skull probably isn’t in his grave

Under the cover of night, the three men crept toward the dusty chancel of the church, carrying dimmed lanterns and an assortment of tools. It took them a few, breathless moments to find the right headstone in the darkness. Ignoring the threat engraved upon it — “cursed be he that moves my bones” — they lifted the heavy slab and began to dig up the grave beneath.
From Shakespeare’s skull probably isn’t in his grave - The Washington Post
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Japanese AI Writes Novel, Passes First Round for Literary Prize

A short-form novel “coauthored” by humans and an artificial intelligence (AI) program passed the first screening process for a domestic literary prize, it was announced on Monday. However, the book did not win the final prize.

Two teams submitted novels that were produced using AI. They held a press conference in Tokyo and made the announcement, which follows the recent victory of an AI program over a top Go player from South Korea. These achievements strongly suggest a dramatic improvement in AI capabilities.

http://the-japan-news.com/news/article/0002826970

James Patterson Has a Big Plan for Small Books

But Mr. Patterson is after an even bigger audience. He wants to sell books to people who have abandoned reading for television, video games, movies and social media. So how do you sell books to somebody who doesn’t normally read? Mr. Patterson’s plan: make them shorter, cheaper, more plot-driven and more widely available. http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/22/business/media/james-patterson-has-a-big-plan-for-small-books.html
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A Loaded Gun: The Real Emily Dickinson : Longreads Blog

Below is an excerpt from A Loaded Gun, by Jerome Charyn, who writes that Emily Dickinson was not just “one more madwoman in the attic,” but rather a messianic modernist, a performance artist, a seductress, and “a woman maddened with rage—against a culture that had no place for a woman with her own fiercely independent mind and will.” This story is recommended by Longreads contributing editor Dana Snitzky. http://blog.longreads.com/2016/03/15/a-loaded-gun-the-real-emily-dickinson/
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JK Rowling accidentally heightens feud between two Scottish libraries

JK Rowling is perhaps one of the UK's most beloved authors, and frequently charms us all with her excellent tweets.
However, with great power comes great responsibility, as she found when she sparked a jealous fight between two libraries.
Orkney Library and Shetland Library have both been arguing over the Harry Potter author.
They have previously had mild spats over who could get the most famous people to follow them:

From JK Rowling accidentally heightens feud between two Scottish libraries - Telegraph

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Angus, Thongs author Louise Rennison dies - BBC News

Louise Rennison, author of Angus, Thongs and Full-Frontal Snogging, has died.
The book, which was part of her series of her hugely popular books The Confessions of Georgia Nicolson, was made into a film starring Aaron Taylor-Johnson in 2008.
Her publisher Harper Collins confirmed the news of her death.
"It is with huge sadness that we can confirm the death of our much loved author and friend, Louise Rennison."
She was in her sixties.

From Angus, Thongs author Louise Rennison dies - BBC News

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Harper Lee, author of To Kill a Mockingbird, dies aged 89

Author whose 1961 novel became a defining text of 20th century literature and of racial troubles in the American south has died in Monroeville, Alabama

From Harper Lee, author of To Kill a Mockingbird, dies aged 89 | Books | The Guardian

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Francis Bacon biography researcher finds friend's unpublished diaries

Thirty-three volumes of Eric Allden’s diaries offer new insights into the artist’s early life and challenge existing myths

From Francis Bacon biography researcher finds friend's unpublished diaries | Art and design | The Guardian

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10 Women Who Changed Sci-Fi

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10 Women Who Changed Sci-Fi
As the Radio 4 documentary Herland examines how science fiction tackles ideas of gender in future worlds, we present a selection of great female authors who have radically altered the genre...

From BBC - Seriously...10 Women Who Changed Sci-Fi

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Edgar Allan Poe Had a Time Machine and I Can Prove It

Curious and tragic, yes, but hardly evidence that the acclaimed horror writer could transcend the limits of space and time. No, my time travel theory concerns the author’s creative output, which you’ll soon see, is so flukishly prophetic as to make my outlandish claim seem plausible—nay, probable!

The proof is in the pudding, and the pudding is a loosely linked map of flesh-eating floaters, crunched skull-survivors, and primordial particles. OK, here we go…

From Edgar Allan Poe Had a Time Machine and I Can Prove It | HistoryBuff | The Future of History

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Lost script reveals what Orson Welles really thought about Ernest Hemingway

Orson Welles once described his relationship with Ernest Hemingway as “very strange”. The two men were friends, rivals and sometimes prickly antagonists. Now a previously unpublished manuscript has revealed just what the director thought about the novelist’s take on a common passion: Spain.

The manuscript, presented in a new study on Welles, reflects his disdain for a type of macho tourist frequently spotted in Spain when mass travel to the country took off in the 1960s. Intended to form the basis of of a love-triangle drama, the script features an American bullfighting aficionado, clearly inspired by Hemingway, as the lead character.

From Lost script reveals what Orson Welles really thought about Ernest Hemingway | Film | The Guardian

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