Librarians

Librarians

Cat-Owning, Knit-Loving, 'Hopelessly Stereotypical' Librarian Is A 'Jeopardy' Badass

A lot of contestants have come and gone on “Jeopardy,” but Margaret Miles officially walked away with our hearts.  Miles is a librarian working at the New Hanover County Public Library in Wilmington, North Carolina who appeared on Thursday’s episode of “Jeopardy.” Alex Trebek couldn’t help but ask Miles more about her life when she was leading mid-show with $7,600. 
From Cat-Owning, Knit-Loving, 'Hopelessly Stereotypical' Librarian Is A 'Jeopardy' Badass
Topic: 

Librarian under house arrest in Moscow accused of anti-Russian propaganda

She's accused of inciting ethnic hatred and violating human dignity. Natalya Sharina is a 58-year-old Russian librarian in Moscow  and though the Russian government says she's not on the Kremlin's radar, someone thinks she and her books are a threat.
From Librarian under house arrest in Moscow accused of anti-Russian propaganda - Home | The Current with Anna Maria Tremonti | CBC Radio
Topic: 

Oregon Libraries Invest In Cutting-Edge Maker Labs

There’s been a growing trend in libraries for several years to create maker spaces — places where cutting-edge creative activities such as computer-aided design, robotics, programming, circuitry and audio-visual editing take their place alongside low-tech crafts like sewing and jewelry-making. 

“Certainly it focuses on technology, which is new,” said Multnomah County Library director Vailey Oehlke, who is also the president of the National Public Library Association. “But I’d also suggest that libraries have a long history of responding to the ways in which community and the world around us is changing. There’s a need in our community for people to understand these new skills.”

From Oregon Libraries Invest In Cutting-Edge Maker Labs . Radio | OPB

Topic: 

The women who lead some of Idaho's libraries

Article from Idaho Mountain Express.

Included are: Jenny Emery Davidson—Ketchum Community Library, LeAnn Gelskey—Hailey Public Library and Kristin Gearhart—Bellevue Public Library.

Topic: 

Library freedom, free speech and the freedom to tinker

But, we’re not as great at dealing with our patrons’ digital interactions. We’re not as great at making sure their web transactions are secure, we’re not as great at making sure their wifi transactions are secure, that they can browse the internet securely. And so there’s this awesome project called the Library Freedom Project, which is all about raising awareness about that issue, number one, but number two actually giving libraries the tools that they need in order to do this. I mean we’re a democracy and so part of that is that everybody is equal to every other person. And you deserve, you know, the same rights to life, liberty, pursuit of happiness, that kind of thing, as everybody else gets. But in reality we’re a very tiered system where people who are more rich or more powerful have access to more and better services, more and better access to things, to tools, to jobs — as well, to obscure stuff like privacy.

From Library freedom, free speech and the freedom to tinker — Medium

Topic: 

‘Master of the River’: A 71-year-old librarian’s 15 years of water commutes

Today, the head of the law cataloguing section of the Library of Congress has retirement on his mind. Later this month , he’ll leave his job managing the inflow of 20,000 books annually, and his more than a decade of cross-river commutes will cease.

From his home in Cheverly, he embarks on a 15-minute bike ride to Bladensburg Waterfront Park. There, he climbs into his fiberglass rowing shell, which he navigates about five miles downriver to the Anacostia Community Boathouse. At the boathouse he climbs onto another bike, whisking through downtown Washington and arriving at the Library of Congress about 90 minutes after leaving home.

From ‘Master of the River’: A 71-year-old librarian’s 15 years of water commutes - The Washington Post

Topic: 

Meme Librarian for Tumblr

Amanda Brennan is a librarian for the Internet. Her career in meme librarianism began in graduate school at Rutgers, where she received a master’s in library science.

But instead of heading to a brick-and-mortar library, Brennan continued documenting online phenomena at Know Your Meme and then at Tumblr, where she solidified her profession as information desk for doge, mmm whatcha say and the other viral Internet sensations in need of classification, categorization and preservation.

Here's the meme-ish story from the Washington Post.

Bringing libraries closer to Wikipedia: Merrilee Proffitt

Merrilee Proffitt (Merrilee) is on a mission to bring American librarians closer to Wikipedia—a group she think is hesitant towards the idea of a community edited encyclopedia.

From Bringing libraries closer to Wikipedia: Merrilee Proffitt « Wikimedia blog

Topic: 

Librarians take legal battle against library closures to government

“We’ve had enough. We’ve marked our line in the sand here. The government is behaving as if it doesn’t have a duty of care and they do, under the law. We think it’s time to be clear about what that means,” said Nick Poole, the chief executive of Cilip, after it was announced that more than 100 library branches were shut last year, and as further branches up and down the UK face closure.

From Librarians take legal battle against library closures to government | Books | The Guardian

Looking Back: the biggest changes in Librarianship this year

As we approach the end of 2015, we asked our Library book series editors Paul T. Jaeger, John Carlo Bertot and Samantha Hines to summarize the biggest changes in Librarianship this year and what they predict to be the main changes during 2016.

From Emerald | Looking Back, Looking Ahead with Jaeger, Bertot and Hines

Topic: 

Video of Josh Hanagame of the Salt Lake City Library

KUER's VideoWest/RadioWest's intro to the video Ties the Room Together. "Josh Hanagarne is a writer and a librarian in Salt Lake City who's written beautifully about his experiences with Tourette syndrome. We had him on RadioWest to talk about his 2013 book The World's Strongest Librarian. We want to thank Josh for letting us tag along and pry into his life."

Here's a photo of Josh holding an "In My Book, you're quite a character" card in the beautiful SLCPL .

Shipping is free during December, visit www.inmybook.com for more details.

"Tsundoku," the Japanese Word for the New Books That Pile Up on Our Shelves, Should Enter the English Language

There are some words out there that are brilliantly evocative and at the same time impossible to fully translate. Yiddish has the word shlimazl, which basically means a perpetually unlucky person. German has the word Backpfeifengesicht, which roughly means a face that is badly in need of a fist. And then there’s the Japanese word tsundoku, which perfectly describes the state of my apartment. It means buying books and letting them pile up unread.

From "Tsundoku," the Japanese Word for the New Books That Pile Up on Our Shelves, Should Enter the English Language | Open Culture

Topic: 

Making Openness My Business

I am still getting daily lessons on what it means to be an advocate for and practitioner of openness. Before I started my professional career I didn't recognize the perseverance needed, or the political savvy, or the tenacity of trusting your gut when it tells you that what you are doing is worth the worry that you are faced with a Sisyphean task well beyond your abilities. If you take anything away from this, know that you do not have to be a researcher to be an important advocate for openness, nor do you have to be an expert in the many facets of openness.

From The Winnower | Making Openness My Business

Topic: 

Do Librarians Swear? F-yeah They Do

Do Librarians Swear? F-yeah They Do

Andrew Carnegie, Librarian

Andrew Carnegie died in 1919, and I became a librarian in 2012. In many ways, Carnegie’s idea of the library still affects my working life today, as it does many others in the library profession. With a staggering largess, Carnegie conspired to shape the library—both physically and professionally—into a service model of dull efficiency and grinding productivity, thereby transforming the library according to his own capitalist view of industry and labor. The thousands of Carnegie libraries scattered across the US stand as a testament both to his dictatorial generosity and to his crushing vision of higher education as workforce development. In this post, I take a brief look at Andrew Carnegie and the connection points among his philanthropy, the library profession, and the anti-intellectual pro-business forces at work in today’s higher education.

From Andrew Carnegie, Librarian — Scott W. H. Young

Topic: 

A magical glimpse into the Tudor imagination: Lost library of John Dee to be revealed

Little wonder this extraordinary man has continually fascinated and served as inspiration to artists from Shakespeare and Ben Johnson to Derek Jarman and Damon Albarn.

Now, the intriguing and mysterious Dee, who survived the machinations of the late Tudor period only to die in poverty in 1608/9, is to be revealed to the public through his remarkable personal library for the first time in history.

From A magical glimpse into the Tudor imagination: Lost library of John Dee to be revealed | Culture24

Jessamyn West, Technology Lady

Let me just start by saying that Jessamyn West is kind of internet famous. She was one of the original moderators for the community blog Metafilter, which is like the civilized version of Reddit. She was recently contacted by the White House for her thoughts on their choice for the next Librarian of Congress. And she speaks internationally about the digital divide. Talking with Jessamyn is a little like being on a really fast ride at the Tunbridge Fair. In this interview, we sat in her kitchen in Randolph, Vermont, and talked about her passion for public libraries and the role of the modern librarian. We also talked about how different people manage their personal relationships with their personal computers. Welcome.

From Jessamyn West, Technology Lady — Medium

Topic: 

Creativity, personalities, librarianship, and Susan Cain’s Quiet

Sure, the Library of Alexandria burnt down — but libraries exist, great and small. They can and do offer programs and items that connect organizations with individuals (DOKLab in the Netherlands, Oak Park’s Idea Box, the Darien Library Catalog, just to name a few). True, libraries these days need to struggle for funding and increase advocacy, such as a convenient book burning.  Also true how we can clash among ourselves due to differing interests, priorities, or personalities. But if we learn to become and recognize quiet, however briefly in however a manner, we can improve library innovation and continue to inspire others as well as ourselves.

From Creativity, personalities, librarianship, and Susan Cain’s Quiet – A TTW Guest Post by Sarah Liberman | Tame The Web

Topic: 

Internet Archive Founder Brewster Kahle on Preserving Knowledge and Affordable Housing

Brewster Kahle wants all knowledge to be accessible digitally. He has worked for over 25 years to make that dream a reality. Kahle is the founder of the Internet Archive, a free online library that preserves books, movies, music, software and even websites via its Wayback Machine. Today, Kahle is also trying to apply open source principles to ease the Bay Area housing crisis. He joins us as part of our First Person series, which highlights the leaders and innovators who make the Bay Area unique.

From Internet Archive Founder Brewster Kahle on Preserving Knowledge and Affordable Housing: Forum | KQED Public Media for Northern CA

Topic: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Librarians