Libraries

Libraries

The board of a West Virginia library reverses decision to refuse ‘Fear’

Submitted by Blake on Sat, 09/15/2018 - 11:45
Topic
Connie Perry, the president of the trustees of the Morgan County Public Library in Berkeley Springs, W.Va., said Friday afternoon by phone that her town library will carry Bob Woodward’s “Fear.” Perry said the library board did not know that the library director had refused to accept a donated copy of “Fear” until the issue was raised in media reports. “The board didn’t know anything about this,” Perry said. “We have corrected that.

Opinion | To Restore Civil Society, Start With the Library - The New York Times

Submitted by Blake on Sun, 09/09/2018 - 18:23
Topic
But the problem that libraries face today isn’t irrelevance. Indeed, in New York and many other cities, library circulation, program attendance and average hours spent visiting are up. The real problem that libraries face is that so many people are using them, and for such a wide variety of purposes, that library systems and their employees are overwhelmed.

Neil Gaiman and Chris Riddell on why we need libraries – an essay in pictures

Submitted by Blake on Fri, 09/07/2018 - 07:25
Topic
Neil Gaiman and Chris Riddell on why we need libraries – an essay in Two great champions of reading for pleasure return to remind us that it really is an important thing to do – and that libraries create literate citizens
From Neil Gaiman and Chris Riddell on why we need libraries – an essay in pictures | Books | The Guardian

Every Book Tour Should Include a Public School

Submitted by Blake on Wed, 09/05/2018 - 13:56
Topic
In my rare calm moments as a curator (when I’m not sending a hundred emails or moving a hundred chairs), I often reflect that the literary world should make greater efforts to reach teenagers, and more high schools should promote contemporary literature by living authors. How else will we build the next generation of literary readers? Writers need young people. Sigrid Nunez agreed.

EU and national funders launch plan for free and immediate open access to journals

Submitted by Blake on Tue, 09/04/2018 - 10:02
Topic
EU and national funders launch plan for free and immediate open access to journals The architect of ‘Plan-S’, Robert-Jan Smits, hopes to force a major change in the business model of academic publishers. The effect will be similar to the abolition of mobile phone roaming charges in Europe, he says
From EU and national funders launch plan for free and immediate open access to journals | Science|Business

Lou Reed’s Archive, Coming to the New York Public Library

Submitted by Blake on Fri, 08/31/2018 - 13:16
Topic
Anderson, from the beginning, wanted people to have access to the complete collection, and wanted much of it digitized and made available online. So she and Fleming reached out to the performing-arts library, which has extensive music collections and artists’ archives. “We were really impressed with the performing-arts people,” Anderson said.
From Lou Reed’s Archive, Coming to the New York Public Library | The New Yorker

Why the Future of Data Storage is (Still) Magnetic Tape

Submitted by Blake on Fri, 08/31/2018 - 10:02
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It’s true that tape doesn’t offer the fast access speeds of hard disks or semiconductor memories. Still, the medium’s advantages are many. To begin with, tape storage is more energy efficient: Once all the data has been recorded, a tape cartridge simply sits quietly in a slot in a robotic library and doesn’t consume any power at all. Tape is also exceedingly reliable, with error rates that are four to five orders of magnitude lower than those of hard drives.

Is Literature Dead?

Submitted by Blake on Thu, 08/30/2018 - 15:43
Topic
This, in an elliptical way, is what Noah was getting at. How do things stick to us in a culture where information and ideas are up so quickly that we have no time to assess one before another takes its place? How does reading maintain its hold on our imagination, or is that question even worth asking anymore? Noah may not be a reader, but he is hardly immune to the charms of a lovely sentence; a few weeks after our conversation at the dinner table, he told me he had finished The Great Gatsby and that the last few chapters had featured the most beautiful writing he’d ever read.

Man discovers mother’s ‘classified’ murder case in Montreal library

Submitted by Blake on Thu, 08/30/2018 - 12:43
Topic
Roxanne Luce, 36, was found on her bed the next morning and died in a hospital days later. Thirty-seven years later, the case remains unsolved. Last year, Luce founded a non-profit called Meurtres et Disparitions Irrésolus du Québec, bringing together families affected by cold cases.
From Man discovers mother’s ‘classified’ murder case in Montreal library | Montreal Gazette

How Frankenstein and Its Writer Mary Shelley Created the Horror Genre

Submitted by Blake on Thu, 08/30/2018 - 10:53
Topic
The fact that these big questions still inform the social implications of science in the 21st century is a key reason that the popularity of Mary Shelley’s story has only grown over time. Since its first publication, the book has never been out of print. Stage productions of the story followed as early as 1822. In the 20th century dozens of films told and retold the Frankenstein story.