Libraries

How Frankenstein and Its Writer Mary Shelley Created the Horror Genre

The fact that these big questions still inform the social implications of science in the 21st century is a key reason that the popularity of Mary Shelley’s story has only grown over time. Since its first publication, the book has never been out of print. Stage productions of the story followed as early as 1822. In the 20th century dozens of films told and retold the Frankenstein story. The most iconic version was produced by Universal Pictures in 1931 and starred Boris Karloff in what became his signature role.
From How Frankenstein and Its Writer Mary Shelley Created the Horror Genre
Topic: 

People of Color, Especially Children, Most Likely to be Asked to Leave Seattle Libraries

African Americans, especially children, are far more likely to be kicked out of Seattle libraries than patrons of other races, according to data the South Seattle Emerald obtained from the Seattle Public Library (SPL) through a public disclosure request. Between January and July 2018, more than a third of patrons who received “exclusions” (notices, which can be verbal, that a patron cannot return to the library for a period ranging from a partial day to two years) were African American. Of 764 exclusions that included information about a patron’s race (61 did not include this information and have been excluded from this analysis), 33.4 percent (or just over one third) were African American; 7.5 percent were Hispanic or Latino; 55.5 percent were white; and the rest were another race.
From People of Color, Especially Children, Most Likely to be Asked to Leave Seattle Libraries | South Seattle Emerald
Topic: 

Technology hasn't killed public libraries – it's inspired them to transform and stay relevant

Critically and most revealingly, libraries are evaluated based on traditional metrics, such as loan and membership numbers, capturing only a fraction of the full value they contribute to our individual and collective life. Failure to recognise this by governments and policymakers puts at risk the diverse and nuanced ways libraries might shape Australia’s future.
From Technology hasn't killed public libraries – it's inspired them to transform and stay relevant
Topic: 

A Running Tally of Items People Have Asked For At The Circ Desk

Today someone handed me a Costco card. For what purpose? To check out books, of course! This is the fourth time in my illustrious library career that this has happened. In honor of this brave soul (who owes me 600 Costco-sized boxes of Kraft macaroni and cheese and a legit flight of boxed wines if they try this again), I present to you a collection of interesting items people have asked for at the circulation desk:
From Buddy, the Library Isn't a 7-Eleven | Literary Hub
Topic: 

How an Artist Is Rebuilding a Baghdad Library Destroyed During the Iraq War

“168:01,” as the project by Iraqi-American artist Wafaa Bilal is titled, is a stark white display featuring bookshelves filled with 1,000 blank books. Visitors are encouraged to replenish the volumes with titles from an Amazon wish list compiled by the college’s students and faculty; donations can be made by sending the books on the wish list to the museum, or by gifting funds to the project through Bilal’s website. In exchange for their donations, visitors are able to take home one of the exhibition’s white volumes that represent a rich cultural heritage stripped bare by years of conflict. In turn, the colorful books they contributed to the project will ultimately be sent to the College of Fine Arts.
From How an Artist Is Rebuilding a Baghdad Library Destroyed During the Iraq War | Smart News | Smithsonian
Topic: 

An Experiment In Asking Questions That Mostly Failed. Twice.

In this article I’m going to tell you about five places to ask questions on the Internet. And hopefully you’ll get better answers than I did! I do think these are great places to ask questions, but I don’t know if I ask terrible questions, or since I’m asking at the beginning of the summer my timing is bad, or something else.
From An Experiment In Asking Questions That Mostly Failed. Twice. – ResearchBuzz
Topic: 

Family claims win in high court challenge to library cuts

A young girl and her family who took on Northamptonshire county council over its plans to close 21 libraries have claimed a win in the high court, after a judge ruled that the cash-strapped council would have to revisit its plans while “paying attention to its legal obligations”.
From Family claims win in high court challenge to Northants library cuts | Books | The Guardian
Topic: 

Book enthusiasts get literary-themed tattoos at the Denver Public Library

Certified Tattoo Studios partnered with the Denver Public Library Friends Foundation to offer library- and literary-themed tattoos at the Rodolfo “Corky” Gonzales Branch Library on Sunday to raise money for the non-profit.
From PHOTOS: Book enthusiasts get literary-themed tattoos at the Denver Public Library — The Know
Topic: 

Punctuation that failed to make its mark

Several writers and inventors in the last century tried to introduce new marks of punctuation into the English language – but they all failed. Keith Houston tells their story.
From BBC - Culture - Punctuation that failed to make its mark
Topic: 

LGBTQ displays not allowed at any Washington County UT libraries

Equality Utah met with Washington County Library officials for the roundtable discussion. There, the library director confirmed that LGBTQ displays have been banned at every one of Washington County's libraries. "If you put up a display that says LGBTQ, you're pushing away a segment of our society," said Joel Tucker, Washington County Library Director. "Have there every been displays on like, Black History Month, or something like that?" asked  Stephen Lambert, with Equality Utah. 
From LGBTQ displays not allowed at any Washington County libraries
Topic: 

Pages

Subscribe to Libraries