Libraries

For John Ashbery’s Personal Library, a Spot on the Shelves at Harvard - The New York Times

The university’s Houghton Library, which began acquiring the poet’s manuscripts and other papers in 1986, has announced the acquisition of the John Ashbery Reading Library, which includes more than 5,000 books of poetry, art criticism, architectural history, philosophy, religious history and cookbooks collected over the poet’s lifetime. The collection, which was donated by Mr. Ashbery’s husband, David Kermani, convey the traces of the poet’s thought, and also of his hand. There are annotated editions of books by Boris Pasternak, Franz Kafka, Friedrich Nietzsche and others, as well as the copy of the “Oxford Book of American Verse” he used as an undergraduate, with pressed flowers used as bookmarks.
From For John Ashbery’s Personal Library, a Spot on the Shelves at Harvard - The New York Times
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The tiny library bringing books to remote villages

“Without a book, so often the child is alone,” says Antonio La Cava. The retired schoolteacher converted his three-wheeled van into a mobile library, the Bibliomotocarro. Driving the hills and mountains of Basilicata, Italy, La Cava is able to reach children in remote villages like San Paolo Albanese, which only has two children of primary school age.
From BBC - Culture - The tiny library bringing books to remote villages
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The Beats' Holy Grail: The Letter That Inspired On the Road

This is not the portrait of a family man, no matter his desire or intention, but of someone coming apart at the seams. “I wake to more horrors than Celine,” he writes in the Joan Anderson Letter, “not a vain statement for now I’ve passed thru just repetitious shudderings and nightmare twitches.” Seventeen years later, at his death, not so much had changed. Yes, the letter helped to reshape Kerouac’s ideas on writing; without it, “On the Road” would have been a very different book. But it also framed Cassady as larger than life, which was both a blessing and a curse. “Legacy?” wonders Ferlinghetti. “His legacy is what Kerouac made of him. What else would his legacy be?”
From The Beats' Holy Grail: The Letter That Inspired On the Road | Literary Hub
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The Milwaukee Public Library Hijacked Brand Logos Like YouTube, Netflix and Spotify to Promote Itself – Adweek

At least, that’s the point the Milwaukee Public Library tried to make earlier this fall when it hijacked those brands’ logos. In an effort to get locals to reconsider the library and what it could do for them, the Milwaukee Public Library and creative shop BVK revamped brand logos. Then it created print work with copy touting the library’s similar offerings to the brand in question and posted the work at local restaurants and bars. The result? It worked.
From The Milwaukee Public Library Hijacked Brand Logos Like YouTube, Netflix and Spotify to Promote Itself – Adweek
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Once Centers Of Soviet Propaganda, Moscow's Libraries Are Having A 'Loud' Revival

Until recently, that culture seemed doomed to become a relic of the analog past. After Russia's rocky transition from Communism and the rise of the Internet, there seemed little use for the more than 400 city libraries as public spaces fell into neglect and Russians found new sources of information. Unexpectedly, Moscow's libraries are now experiencing a transformation from musty houses of Soviet propaganda into bustling work spaces for 21st century city-dwellers.
From Once Centers Of Soviet Propaganda, Moscow's Libraries Are Having A 'Loud' Revival : NPR
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The Hunt for the Nazi Loot Still Sitting on Library Shelves

The hunt for the millions of books stolen by the Nazis during World War II has been pursued quietly and diligently for decades, but it has been largely ignored, even as the search for lost art drew headlines. The plundered volumes seldom carried the same glamour as the looted paintings, which were often masterpieces worth millions of dollars. But recently, with little fanfare, the search for the books has intensified, driven by researchers in America and Europe who have developed a road map of sorts to track the stolen books, many of which are still hiding in plain sight on library shelves throughout Europe.
From The Hunt for the Nazi Loot Still Sitting on Library Shelves - The New York Times
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Man held in fatal stabbing of director of Fort Myers Beach library

"It's devastating," said Sallie Seabury, president of the Fort Myers Beach Public Library board. "We were having a book sale and he went to open the doors." Police tape cordoned off the main entrance to the library and blood could be seen by the front doors.
From Man held in fatal stabbing of director of Fort Myers Beach library
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Why Georgia Tech is moving 95% of its library books off campus

The project is "a fundamental rethinking of what a research library in this century in an academic institution is supposed to do," Catherine Murray-Rust, Georgia Tech's dean of libraries, told Business Insider. Under the new renovations, students will be able to borrow library books the same as always. Only now, when they find a book in the digital catalog and scan their library cards, the book must be delivered from the storage site five miles away from campus.
From Why Georgia Tech is moving 95% of its library books off campus - Business Insider
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Hopepunk can’t fix our broken science fiction.

Yet I have come to suspect these punk derivatives signal something more than the usual merry-go-round of pop culture. These punks indicate that something is broken in our science fiction. Indeed, even when they reject it, these new subgenres often repeat the same gestures as cyberpunk, discover the same facts about the world, and tell the same story. Our hacker hero (or his magic-wielding counterpart) faces a huge system of power, overcomes long odds, and finally makes the world marginally better—but not so much better that the author can’t write a sequel. The 1980s have, in a sense, never ended; they seem as if they might never end.
From Hopepunk can’t fix our broken science fiction.
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The library of forbidden books

From 1976 until his death in 2013, Georg P Salzmann collected about 12,000 books that had been banned – and burnt – by the Nazis for being ‘un-German’. His father – a Nazi – had shot himself in 1945, when Georg was a teenager. What became known as the Library of Burnt Books was sold to the University of Augsburg in 2009 – and is now open to the public. Stumpf describes the first book that Salzmann bought, as well as how one author witnessed his own books being burnt.
From BBC - Culture - The library of forbidden books
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