Social Networking

Make sure to give your website the bird

Submitted by Amy Watts on Thu, 06/07/2012 - 10:48

Twitter's changed their primary logo and discarded several alternate versions of their logo at the same time. With this change we get updated graphics downloads and usage guidelines.

The gist:

Do:

  • Use our official, unmodified Twitter bird to represent our brand.
  • Make sure the bird faces right.
  • Allow for at least 150% buffer space around the bird.

Don't:

Pinterest for Libraries

Submitted by birdie on Wed, 03/28/2012 - 15:47

The only way you’ve not heard about Pinterest yet is if you have been totally living under a rock. Allow me to enlighten you. Pinterest is a social photo sharing website, styled like a pin-board, that lets you create and manage theme based photo collection. Not only has it become a rage with home users, it is also being used by businesses and non profits to gather visibility and let people know about them.

Interestingly, libraries too are jumping on to the Pinterest band wagon as well, to encourage visitors to use their services as well to facilitate the library experience of existing users. Here are 20 creative ways libraries around the world are using this new social platform to communicate with the common reader; twenty categories are suggested.

1. Pinning book covers
2. Reading lists
3. Attracting children and teenagers
4. Displaying archives
5. Letting people know about new acquisitions
6. Helping out in research
7. Showing off your library
8. Sharing infographics related to learning
9. Promoting library activities
10. Sharing digital collection
11. Managing reading programs
12. Sharing ideas with parents
13. Bringing focus on library staff
14. Getting new ideas for library displays
15. Collecting ideas for programs
16. Drawing attention to the local community
17. Sharing craft projects
18. Connecting to other libraries
19. Encouraging book clubs
20. Interacting with patrons

On Facebook, Librarian Brings Two Students from the Early 1900s To Life

Submitted by birdie on Fri, 01/06/2012 - 12:35

Facebook user “joe1915” writes wall posts that would be familiar to any college student these days: He stresses about tests, roots for his university’s football team, and shows off photos from campus dances.

But Joe McDonald isn’t an average smartphone-toting student. He died in 1971 — 33 years before Facebook arrived on the Web.

CIA’s ‘vengeful librarians’ stalk Twitter and Facebook

Submitted by Blake Carver (not verified) on Fri, 11/04/2011 - 17:30

At the agency's Open Source Centre, a team known affectionately as the "vengeful librarians" also pores over newspapers, TV news channels, local radio stations, Internet chat rooms - anything overseas that anyone can access and contribute to openly.

Do Salt Lake City Librarians Have a Censorship Problem?

Submitted by birdie on Wed, 10/19/2011 - 11:00

Salt Lake City Library employees say the latest chapter on staff turmoil is rich with irony: a clampdown on free speech inside the very institution that celebrates the principle.

A just-launched crackdown on any opinionated email — and on criticism of management expressed via social media — has some veteran librarians fearing for their jobs and a chorus of others crying censorship.

Even Friends of the Library members are openly questioning the library’s direction and its “chronic problems.”

Library Consultants and Social Networking

Submitted by Blake Carver (not verified) on Tue, 08/30/2011 - 15:42
I originally posted this on my blog Bill the Librarian and on Google Plus as well as Facebook and Twitter.

In an effort to build up my own consulting, I have been contacting companies and individuals that do library consulting. I have heard from many people in this effort. I am trying to find those that participate in and also consult with libraries in the use of social networking and social media.

Anyone Want to Check Out Google+? Sorry...

Submitted by birdie on Fri, 07/01/2011 - 13:07

...sorry, you'll need an invite.

It's the tech world's version of the velvet rope. Companies such as Google hope that by limiting the number of people who can join their services -- like Google+, which is seen as Google's answer to Facebook -- they will be able drive up the buzz for those new sites.

A theory of human behavior is at work here: People want what they can't have. It's hard not to at least be curious what the new Google social network is like when every tech blogger on the Internet is writing about it.