Must Read Stories

Must Read Stories

Internet Access, Filtering and Monitoring

Submitted by Ieleen on Mon, 08/20/2001 - 11:46

I stumbled across this one earlier today and it contains some great information. Cindy Curling, Electronic Resources Librarian for a Washington DC firm, did an informal survey of librarians and others on issues of privacy and filtering, and the responses and related comments are very interesting. I recommend taking the time to read the entire article and exploring the included links. Although the title mentions law libraries, specifically, the information contained in the article goes far beyond that.

The Dawn of the Pay-Per-View Web?

Submitted by Ryan on Fri, 07/13/2001 - 12:19

This just in from Slashdot- a potentially grim development for those providing their patrons with free Web access:

\"A Norwegian newssite (digitoday.no) has a story . . . about a Swedish company\'s filter-system which enable content-delivery sites to differentiate between different ISP\'s. This means that the ISP has to pay a fee to the site in order to enable the site\'s content to the ISP\'s users. Another story (also norwegian) discusses the implications of this. They report that the swedish company (Tric AB) will \"act as a third party between ISP\'s and content-suppliers with the intent to let the content-suppliers get a share of the access-income. It will act as a clearinghouse where the income from the ISP\'s is distributed to different content-suppliers in relation to size and traffic\". According to a swedish newssite (Ekonomi24.se), Tric has already gathered the largest content-suppliers in Sweden and they are already in discussions with the large ISP and telecoms in Sweden (Telia, Tele2 etc.) which are positive to this. The background for this initiative is the problem of financing the content on the Internet. So far it\'s all been advertising and subsidising from other parts of the companies, now it will be the up to the ISP and telecom-companies to share the income with other actors. This would also be the death of smaller ISP\'s that feed off the free structure of the net, given that this model is applied to the entire net. And not to forget the new business created: clearinghouses. We were just waiting for another level of complicity.\" Either your ISP pays a fee to the content provider (raising your access fees, of course), or the provider blocks access to itself from all of your ISP\'s users and you have to deal with their complaints. We\'ll probably see this in the U.S. soon, as the next stage in the media consolidation.\"

Scroll down to about the 1/2 way mark on the page to find this article and a link to the 100+ outraged responses. Thanks to Metafilter.

Judith Platt Responds

Submitted by Blake on Thu, 07/12/2001 - 13:14

Judith Platt has responded on her radical librarian remarks below.
\"The last thing that I intended was to anger or alienate the library
community. I value them as friends, colleagues and allies in the fight for
free expression and literacy. If publishers and librarians don\'t always see
eye-to-eye on copyright issues, we\'ve been able to seek workable compromises
in the past, and we have every expectation of doing so in the digital
environment.

I was quoted completely out of context ZDNet news article.

more.......

Library radicals targeted in latest copyright battles

Submitted by Blake on Thu, 07/12/2001 - 13:08

News.com Is Reporting on the copyright controversy that casts us as villains simply for doing our job.

And you thought Pat Schroeder was bad a few months ago?
\"They\'ve got their radical factions, like the Ruby Ridge or Waco types, who want to share all content for free, said Judith Platt, a spokeswoman for the Association of American Publishers.\"

The Case for Micropayments

Submitted by Ryan on Tue, 06/26/2001 - 17:17

Scott McCloud\'s smart and beautifully presented defense of file-sharing technology, and how it can benefit both artists and consumers, in two parts [Part 1 and Part 2]

\"When there\'s a direct exchange between creators of art and their audiences . . .small charges could earn those creators a decent living - while the army of middlemen . . .could go back to selling detergent, real estate, and two-by-fours.\"

[via Rebecca\'s Pocket]

Questia Responds

Submitted by Blake on Mon, 03/05/2001 - 12:08

I got a response from Questia on This Story. I have also been granted an interview with Questia, so if you have Questions For Questia, post them below, and I\'ll pass them along.

\"I\'d like to respond to your Feb. 22 story on \"Questionable
Advertising @ Questia???\"

Questia\'s business and marketing philosophies seek the greatest degree of
inclusion possible. We believe the feedback and interest from the
librarian and academic communities, particularly, are crucial to the
quality of content and service Questia provides. Therefore, proactive
education campaigns to these audiences have been in progress for more than
a year.
More....