Must Read Stories

Must Read Stories

Questionable Advertising @ Questia???

Questia seems to be using what some might consider questionable advertising techniques, personally I\'d call it SPAM, or worse, but make up your own mind.
Steven Bell pointed out (On COLLIB-L) some interesting posts he found on the new Google Groups (the old deja.com), so I did some searching, and found some very \"interesting\" posts from \"people\" about Questia. Interesting and people are emphasized here to highlight the important words I am questioning. They seem to be spamming, a number of academic oriented newsgroups, and Ebay under what may be considered false pretenses. The people posting the messages try to make it look like they are not affiliated with Questia (most of the time), but some evidence shows this is may not be entirely true. If they are really using this type of advertising they are guilty of fraud at worst, and being a slimy corporation at best. I have sent this story along to Questia for comment, and I really hope to hear back.


Read on to see what I found.

AAP Wants No Fair Use

This Story from The Washington Post should scare you.

It\'s a story about Patricia Schroeder (president of the Washington- and New York-based Association of American Publishers) and she says the AAP should \"have a very serious issue with librarians.\"

She says publishers do not believe that the public should have the same fair use rights in the electronic world as the prit world and the AAP is looking for ways to charge library patrons for information.

It\'s Time to Rethink Our Public Libraries

International Herald Tribune has a Very Interesting Story on the future of the public library.

They say Yahoo and other information Web sites have taken over many of the functions of public libraries. A great deal of information is not accessible, because it is in libraries, and not on the internet which is a much more effective means of accessing information.

So what to do?
Each library would be responsible for maintaining and updating detailed Web sites in one or more narrow subjects, and this would be available on the internet. This will need a national task force to figure out and Laura Bush would be perfect for the job.

Librarians and Librarianship on CNN

Beth Ten Have writes \"Don\'t miss
This Story at CNN \"

There seem to be two main types of stories in the major press, this is one of the good kinds.

It says that librarians, and libraries will be just fine, and people are finding them more important than ever with the internet being so overwhelming for so many folks.

One very interesting stat, 2,634 reference librarians were employed by public libraries in 1995 now the number is 4,100. It includes a little \"Library Trivia\" are that is pretty cool as well. Of the 1053 stories I have posted, this is probably the nicest.

No More Fair Use under DMCA

The DMCA continues to send shivers down my spine. Wired has a Story that has some not-so-nice things to say. Critics of the DMCA say it could lead to a pay-per-use world where consumers don\'t truly own the books, movies and music they purchase. On Oct. 28, the librarian of Congress will announce new rules governing the access provisions of the DMCA. Remember:

Fair use is not a defense to the DMCA.

\"The technological measures, which may be as simple as a password, place restrictions on who can use the digital information and often disenfranchise the public. Whereas the public may use the same print resources in a law library, in the digital arena law libraries are no longer able to provide equal access to all users.\"

Man who hit King mysteriously dies

I did not how to categorize this article from Canoe. It seems that the man who hit Stephen King with his car has died, and the autopsy revealed nothing about the cause of death.\"The autopsy Monday also found no evidence of trauma but no conclusion was reached on the cause of death pending the outcome of toxicology tests, according to a statement from the state medical examiner\'s office. Those tests could take several months.\"

The Shape of the 21st Century Library

The Shape of the 21st Century Library, by Howard Besser, a LIS professor at UCLA, was a chapter in Information Imagineering: Meeting at the Interface, published by ALA. This paper discusses the rapid evolution of libraries and stresses the importance of librarians\' active, intelligent intervention in the changes that are taking place if librarianship\'s core missions and values are to be preserved. Changes in other institutions, technology trends, disintermediation, and the mission of public libraries are discussed. I think this paper makes a good statement and could be a good discussion piece for the LISNews community... An excerpt here:

Librarianship and Resistance

Librarianship and Resistance, by Sandy Iverson, published in Progressive Librarian 15, is an article about our role in society as librarians. It is particularly concerned with refuting the myth of \"neutrality\" that informs so much of our professional education. Our ethic of neutrality masks our support for dominant ideas. This dynamic is usually invisible to librarians themselves.

\'Tools\' fail as strategies to keep kids away from Net sex at libraries

This Commentary by Paul McMasters from Freedom Forum is filled with excellent points on First Amendment issues and libraries. Many good lines here for Friday\'s \"Quote of the Week\"\"we must rely on the fact that our children are remarkably resilient, relentlessly individual and essentially good. They have thrived on extensive First Amendment rights and deserve to arrive at adulthood with those rights intact.\"

Book Mobile Can Be Magic

Check out The Magic Book Bus by Catherine Chute
from Homebase (the non-profit feminist group Mothers Are Women)Catherine Chute writes:

Many of us may be familiar with The Magic School Bus (the television series about the incredibly resourceful science teacher Ms Frizzle and her class). It is easy to read the books or watch the television show with a sense of detachment. We know that magic school buses don\'t really exist.

This may be the case where you live, but not here, not in Chester, Nova Scotia, where I am.
Even though this is not a fanciful place and we are pretty sensible folk in all other ways, something magical happens when the bookmobile comes to town.

Can hyperlinks be outlawed?

This Story from Salon.com is raising a terrifying possiblity.

\"Can hyperlinks be outlawed? Only last week, a California judge ruled, in a case brought by Ticketmaster against Tickets.com, that it\'s not illegal for one site to link to another. Among other things, that suit concerned \"deep linking.\" Ticketmaster alleged that by bypassing its home page and linking directly to \"inside\" pages, Tickets.com violated its copyright. The judge, however, held that \"hyperlinking does not in itself involve a violation of the Copyright Act.\"

U. Michigan protesters check out 3,000 books

Read this article from Excite News about this unique form of protest . It would be interesting to get some responses to this article. Does this protest infringe on the right to access information? How about its impact on library staff?

Each day University students, faculty and staff check out about 300 books from the Shapiro Undergraduate Library. But Thursday a group of graduate students borrowed nearly 3,000 books in less than three hours.

The 50 students checked out the books to protest how the University administration handled the conflict between the Students of Color Coalition and the senior honor society
Michigamua.

FRC says sex crimes serious problem in libraries

WASHINGTON, March 15 /PRNewswire/ -- \"There\'s a sea of
evidence that Internet pornography and related sex crimes
are a serious problem in America\'s libraries -- and we\'ve
only uncovered the tip of the iceberg, due to efforts by the
American Library Association to chill the facts,\" said
Family Research Council\'s Chief Spokesperson Janet Parshall
at a news conference Wednesday as FRC released a new
investigative report, \"Dangerous Access, 2000 Edition:
Uncovering Internet Pornography in America\'s Libraries.\"
Written by librarian David Burt after a six-month nationwide
investigation of library documents and computer logs,
\"Dangerous Access, 2000 Edition\" reports over 2,000
incidents of library patrons using online services to access
pornography. It is believed that thousands of more incidents
would have been reported had not the ALA intervened.

School libraries need modern books, Sen. Jack Reed says

Read this story here. From the Nando Times.

Most of the books in the nation\'s public school libraries predate the 1969 moon landing, the end of the Vietnam War and the breakup of the Soviet Union, according to critics who say schools need help in offering students newer, relevant works.

And more importantly, says one lawmaker seeking federal funding, the outdated books often don\'t reflect the
diversity of today\'s schoolrooms.

\"Students continually encounter books from a period when authors viewed the world from only a white perspective,\" said Sen. Jack Reed, a Rhode Island Democrat who argues that Congress can and should help school libraries update their materials.

Libraries help show girls where to fit in as women, speaker says

Read this story Here. From the Flint Journal.

Dr. Alexa Canady was on academic probation as an
undergraduate at the University of Michigan, so she has
a hard time believing she is now a mentor to young
women. \"I didn\'t consider myself a role model until it
became clear that other people did,\" said Canady, chief
of neurosurgery at Children\'s Hospital of Michigan in
Detroit.

Canady was at the Flint Public Library talking to a group
of mostly women and girls Tuesday about the significant
role libraries have played in her life. The program was
part of the library\'s Women\'s History Month celebration.

In desperation, man visits library, learns to rob banks

Check out this article Here. From the Birmingham News.

His slide had been a long one. The 43-year-old preacher\'s son had started out as the pudgy kid whose teachers said didn\'t reach his potential. The Army hadn\'t helped and then he bounced from job to job. Now he owed child support. He had maxed his credit card. He was drinking again. And he had gotten fired after a drunken-driving arrest in 1998.

The Newbery Awards

LISnews would like to thank Christina for submitting the link to this great article on the history and importance of the Newberry Awards. From Open Spaces Quartley.

The Newbery is the Holy Grail of American children\'s book writers. There are other awards -- the National Book Award for Young People\'s Literature, for example -- but none comes close to conferring the cachet, the recognition, that the Newbery conveys. It is the oldest children\'s book award in the world. Libraries and bookstores have shelves devoted to Newbery winners. The author\'s future books -- and reissued earlier ones -- will frequently bear on their covers the legend \"Newbery Award author.\"

When libraries faced the future

It\'s rare to find someone who says so many nice things about
librarians in one article. Th
is article
I found in the magazine University
Business
has nothing but praise for the foresight
librarians have when dealing with technology.

STROLLING
THROUGH the university library used to be a walk down memory
lane for returning alumni. Cavernous reading rooms evoked
similar memories for both the 50th reunion class and the
5th. Not anymore. During the past decade, card catalogs have
become little more than decorative furniture, and the
periodical room is now likely to be full of terminals to
access online journals. Not even the class of 1995 would
recognize the Encyclopaedia Britannica; it has abandoned
hard copy and CD-ROMs for a Web-based product.

H.R. 354 Vote Coming Up

Infodude writes No URL available yet.

ALAWON: American Library Association Washington Office
Newsline
Volume 9, Number 6
February 8, 2000

In this issue:

Urgent Action Alert: Vote on Problematic Database Imminent; Ask
Your Representative to Vote Against H.R. 354 and For H.R. 1858
Today

Here we go again...! As early as the week of February 14, Rep.
Howard Coble\'s (R-NC) problematic database bill, H.R. 354, the
Collections of Information Antipiracy Act (which ALA opposes),
could come up for a vote in the House....Be sure to read on...

Misinformation Services - Nation’s School Libraries Desperate for Funding

Read this story Here. From ABCnews.com.

In America’s schools these days, students can learn more than the usual reading,writing and arithmetic. They can find out the benefits of asbestos insulation, the geography of
the U.S.S.R. or how man will someday walk on the moon.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Must Read Stories