Patriot Act

Patriot Act

Calling It 'Metadata' Doesn't Make Surveillance Less Intrusive

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Tue, 06/25/2013 - 09:38

Whether it's logs of phone calls or GPS data, commentator Geoff Nunberg says it still says a lot about who you are: "Tell me where you've been and who you've been talking to, and I'll tell you about your politics, your health, your sexual orientation, your finances," he says.

Full piece

Notre Dame librarian tries to bring halt to snooping

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Sat, 09/10/2011 - 11:26
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Doug Archer thinks twice before he Googles.

Archer, a reference and peace studies librarian at the University of Notre Dame, is careful not to type potentially inflammatory words, such as "bomb."

Why? Because he knows the government might be watching.

The Patriot Act, which was passed in the weeks following the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, authorizes the government to monitor which library books people check out and what they search for on the Internet.

Since PNLA-L has all these updates on TSA...

Submitted by StephenK on Tue, 11/23/2010 - 15:37

As I've seen quite a bit of chatter on library-related e-mail reflectors, it is perhaps best to mirror the new signage the TSA just put out for holiday travel. I'm attaching the PDF here so it will distribute outward as a booklet as far as iTunes is concerned in the podcast feed. Podcast feeds can handle more than just audio and video files...

You can find more signage and the government PSA we'll likely be airing here: http://www.tsa.gov/travelers/holiday_travel.shtm

Obama Backs Extending Patriot Act Spy Provisions

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Wed, 09/16/2009 - 00:18
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The Obama administration has told Congress it supports renewing three provisions of the Patriot Act due to expire at year’s end, measures making it easier for the government to spy within the United States.

In a letter to Sen. Patrick Leahy, the Vermont Democrat and chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, the Justice Department said the administration might consider “modifications” to the act in order to protect civil liberties.

When the law is not the law

Submitted by reellis67 on Mon, 11/17/2008 - 17:36

Libraries are involved with patron's personal information, we all know that. We know who has what book checked out, and in many system there is a record of who has read what, used which computer, etc. Even when there are no physical records, this information can still exist in the form of logs, computer related information that is carried over for a period of time (cookies, etc.), and when books are checked out of a State libraries the records may exist outside the library where the materials were accessed even if that library does not keep records itself once the materials have been returned. It's just a fact of life.

There are laws in place to protect us, the public, from abuse of those in power when it comes to these records. And, while they are certainly not perfect, from from so since 2001, they are still the law, and this is a land of law and order based on those laws - or so we are told. In certain circumstances, people in positions of authority know that if they use their influence to coerce members of the public to abandon their rights, they will often get compliance despite their request being illegal. It happens all the time.

Obama and Libraries

Submitted by birdie on Wed, 11/05/2008 - 12:59

It may be too soon to know how high libraries will fare on President-elect Barack Obama’s agenda, but it’s safe to say that the profession has a special place in the heart of the next president of the United States.

Emily Sheketoff, executive director of the American Library Association’s (ALA) Washington office, says she’s confident that Obama will recognize the “importance of what we do” because he has a track record of supporting libraries in the past. Take, for instance, his address to ALA in June 2005.