libraries

What to do with your rainy weekend

Spring is here and for rainy weekends around the country I would like to propose that we all get away from the gloomy news of melting economies and shrinking budgets and have some fun by watching one or all of the ten most notable movies that have scenes with libraries and librarians in them. Please feel free to add to this list, here is what I found http://www.filmlibrarian.info/

"I can quit Googling anytime, man!"

On the heels of last night’s post, I saw this older article come across Twitter entitled “100 Things You Should Know About People: #8 — Dopamine Makes You Addicted To Seeking Information”. Apparently, it would appear that librarians are not simply the kind, educated information philanthropists that society and culture has caricatured us.

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The Body of Information

I just finished reading a New York Times article entitled “Abstract Thoughts? The Body Takes Them Literally” that came out a few days ago. Librarians certainly talk about how information is organized and how it can be accessed, and so I thought this article relates well in talking about how the brain (our ultimate end user) perceives information. It is part of an psychological field called embodied cognition.

Notable quote:

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Re: Nothing is the Future, ctd.

Some of the commenters to Wayne Bivens-Tatum’s post “Nothing is the Future” seem to be under the odd impression that his post is an response to Library 2.0/101. It could be one till you get to the last paragraph of his post.

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Re: Nothing is the Future

This is a reaction post of “Nothing is the Future” by Wayne Bivens-Tatum (Academic Librarian).

While my astute professional peer makes excellent points concerning the hyperbole in library technology trends, I feel that there is an excellent lesson to his post: while librarians can and should act as leaders for their patrons, they should also be followers and listeners.

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Emerging Trends and Technologies in Libraries and Information Services Blog

The aim of the International Symposium on Emerging Trends and Technologies in Libraries and Information Services (ETTLIS-2010) is, once again, to bring researchers, academicians, business community and research scholars on a common platform to share their experiences, innovative ideas and research findings about the aspects of emerging trends and technologies in the field of knowledge resource centres and information services.

Access blog at: ETTLIS 2010 http://ettlis2010.ning.com/profiles/blog/list

5 Universal Truths That All Librarians Can Agree Upon Right Now

Over the last couple of days, I have been reading a flurry of “end of the year” posts. These end of year reflections (and the end of the decade that people had a hard time naming) have made me think about my own reflection of these time periods. It was only within this last past year that I really delved into the library and librarian blogosphere. During this time, what has really captured my interest in the library oriented blogs is the spectrum of beliefs that exist when it comes to where libraries are going and where they should be heading. In thinking about the wide range of perspectives, the different library theory approaches, and the variety of libraries that exist, I believe there are five current universal truths that will be the basis for any discussion about the library in the future decade.

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The search for the next big thing, ctd

As the Christmas shopping season officially began over the Thanksgiving holiday, I have been thinking about what the next big thing will be for librarians and libraries in the near future. It’s possibly the right time of year for this type of meditation as business put out their latest and greatest wares for the seasonal marketplace buying frenzy. What is the “must have” item for libraries in this coming year? Is it mobile platforms? Open source programs? Google Wave servers? Lendable e-reader devices? While these certainly have their appeal to the technophile in me, I think the answer is more basic than these contemporary offerings. Like the holidays of this season, I believe that the next big thing in the coming year is a focus on people. Ourselves, our staff, and the communities that we serve: it is a matter of advocacy.

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"The Law of Stackable Hamsters"

Picture by jpockele/Flickr

On Thanksgiving, my brother was talking about one of his creative writing classes. He’s on the English faculty at a local college and, as a published author, he is tasked with teaching writing to incoming freshman and sophomores. I’ve certainly heard a lot about his students, both the good ones and the not-so-good ones, and some of his classroom experiences. But when he was telling a story and tossed out the term, “The Law of Stackable Hamsters”, I made him stop and explain that one.

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Thoughts on Schools and Libraries

Picture by Atelier Teee/Flickr Since I thought about this observation while getting into my car to go to dinner the other evening, I haven’t been able to shake it out of my system.

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A Solar Powered Library

Taiwan has begun construction on a solar-powered library in the
Taiwanese capital of Taipei and could benefit from new incentives designed to offer solar energy providers above-market prices for the energy they generate. Rooftop solar panels will provide electricity to the two-story building. Construction started last week and is expected to be finished by June 2010. The library is a donation by Cheng Fu-tien, the late chairman of Taiwanese solar cell maker Motech Industries." - BusinessGreen

The Failure of E-Reader Devices, Ctd.

Since my initial post on the subject two and half weeks ago, I have read over the replies that have accumulated across a couple of sites. I’ve appreciated the time that commenters have put into their replies to the post. In reflecting upon the discussions put forth, I can see that major flaw of my post was lumping e-readers and e-book stores together. In separating the two, it creates a pair of much more navigable and manageable issues for the library.

The 2010 Census, the Latino Community and Libraries

I recently listened to an interview on NPR concerning the debate brewing in the Latino community concerning the participation of undocumented workers in the 2010 Census.

This is a link to the NPR interview. http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=104001209&ft=1&f=1003&sc=YahooNews

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Support Your Glocal Library

The libraries that thrive in the coming years will be those that learn to offer the best glocal service. Glocalization is the new term that some are bantering about in the fields of politics and economics, where although the populace around the world is able to conduct global business at will, but the concerns of both the worker and the consumer is turning to local issues.

The libraries that can best master glocalization will me the most likely to excell.

Great glocal libraries will:

A New Type Of Identity Theft in 2009

Today in 2009 a new bunch of identity thieves will soon come after your web profiles. Aladdin a security firm has produced their security report.. According to their report, if you don't own and control your online persona, it's relatively easy for a anyone to aggregate the known public information about you in order to create a fake one.
Those Without Social Network Profiles Could Have Online Identities Stolen
This new type of identity theft was listed among other predictions for 2009 in the firm's annual report and was based on previous trends which included a rise in attacks distributed through social networking channels.
According to the report this new type of identity theft will be "devastating, both on the personal level by creating difficulties in employment, damaging social and professional connections, ruining reputations; as well as on a financial level, such as stealing customers, corporate data,"
The team at Aladdin was able to set up fake online identities which ended up connecting to the real network of friends and acquaintances easily.
What began as a harmless "fun" way to socialize, grew into a professional way to maintain someone's network and make new connections, the report notes. Unfortunately, this new type of identity theft, aka "identity hijacking," will become more of an issue in 2009 unless social networking sites create ideas that will incorporate better, more trustworthy ways of connecting an online persona to a real person.

Gradual Shifts In The Libraries

We are seeing a gradual shift from desktop applications towards web hosted clones that run in browsers. For instance , microsoft office live, google docs, zoho & think free. We will see a shift from organizing information spatially (directories, folders,desktops) to organizing information temporally (feeds live streams, & microblogs. The biggest ultimatum is not retrieving information but keeping up with it.

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The Google Generation & the Digital Transition

An interesting study was commissioned by the British library and the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) identify how specialist researchers of the future, currently in their school years and preschool years are likely to access and interact with digital resources in 5-10 years time. Additionally, the study is to assist library and information services to anticipate and react to any new or emerging behaviors in the most effective way.
The report defines the "Google Generation" as those born after 1993.
The study was to establish whether or not as a result of digital transition, the "Google" generation are searching for and researching content in new ways; and whether it is likely to mold their future behaviors as mature researchers. Additionally, whether or not,new ways of searching content will be any different from the way researchers & scholars carry out their work.
Moreover,research libraries face a great deal of challenges today in the digital marketplace. Today, they're adjusting to facebook.
Additionally,the study found the the "Google" generation and information literacy of young people,has not improved even with more access to technology. Young people spend little time evaluating information. Young people have poor understanding of their information needs. As a result, they exhibit a strong performance for expressing themselves in natural language rather than analyzing which key words might be more effective/
Finally the study suggests that print sales will diminish drastically as blogs, RSS,media players, and podcasting devices become established.

Best Careers of 2009

So...once again, we are listed as one of the best careers of 2009 in U.S. News and World Report. I find this exciting because we were one of the best careers of 2008, too. It's nice to know that not everyone thinks we can be replaced by Wikipedia.

Bunny Burnstein

P.S. I love the comments on the last post. Very interesting!

Libraries in a Tough Economy...are we winning or losing?

I read this entry (and watched the video) from ALA TechSource, and I just have to comment on it. Yes, it makes sense that, in this economical climate, libraries are booming with business. Free books, free movies, free Internet...sometimes free entertainment for the family. These are all important reasons libraries exist. Yet...aren't we still victims of this economy? Less money means less jobs...or lower-paying jobs.

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The Future of Public Libraries

Years ago the tech society predicted an end of the public library. Thomas Frey, Senior Futurist (Da Vinci Institute) notes that critics failed to predict the library's ability to reinvent themselves. Thus, libraries thrive well in our information environment. Cities across the continents are investing heavily in public libraries. These libraries contain opulent multistory structures, equipped with cutting edge technology.
Libraries have evolved into interactive research and leisure centers.

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