Linux

Linux

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #262

UbuCon Ohio 2013 Announcement

A brief announcement for the UbuCon event being organized by Ubuntu Ohio at Ohio Linux Fest 2013 where librarians curious about Linux and/or Ubuntu are welcome.

Download here (MP3) (ogg)

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #246

This week's episode brings a brief essay, retransmission of an excerpt of a program from US government external broadcaster Voice of America concerning the cyber-snooping situation, and a news miscellany.

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Download here (MP3) (Ogg Vorbis) (Free Lossless Audio Codec) (Speex), or subscribe to the podcast (MP3) to have episodes delivered to your media player. We suggest subscribing by way of a service like gpodder.net. Matériel purchasing needs of the Air Staff can be found from time to time via Amazon where such can be purchased and sent to them.

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/.

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #244

This week's program brings the annual warnings about hurricane season followed by Profile America mentioning an interesting new data release the Census Bureau is making and then a news miscellany.

Related links:

Download here (MP3) (Ogg Vorbis) (Free Lossless Audio Codec) (Speex), or subscribe to the podcast (MP3) to have episodes delivered to your media player. We suggest subscribing by way of a service like gpodder.net. Operational support items for the Air Staff can be purchased and sent to the production team via this Amazon wishlist.

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/.

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #242

And we're back. The first episode after the production suspension has a series of brief essays followed by a news miscellany.

Related links:

Download here (MP3) (Ogg Vorbis) (Free Lossless Audio Codec) (Torrent), or subscribe to the podcast (MP3) to have episodes delivered to your media player. We suggest subscribing by way of a service like gpodder.net.

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/.

The day TuxPaint became contagious in my library

Topic: 
In a short span of time, the free TuxPaint drawing program became wildly popular in our public library's computer center. I was surprised at how much older students enjoyed using the program. http://opensource.com/education/12/5/day-tuxpaint-became-contagious

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #189

Promo for LISTen's Shortwave Debut

"In protest of the Stop Online Piracy Act proposal, LISTen will be making its debut on shortwave radio. On New Year's Eve, we'll be on WBCQ The Planet on 5.110 MHz at 6 PM Eastern/11 PM Coordinated Universal Time.

Demographic Rambling

Four years of podcasting with LISNews.org has been interesting. The statistics make things even more interesting. Sadly, I do not have a complete set of data points. Those that I do have worry me.

Location is key. When it comes to covering the Library & Information Science world, our main focus is not geography but instead topical matters. Based upon what data I can derive from FeedBurner's limited statistics, we may cover the right topical matters but hit all the wrong areas of geographical coverage.

From the limited geographical data I have, the bulk of listeners to LISTen: An LISNews.org Program happen to be located in places like the United Kingdom, New Zealand, and Canada. US listenership actually comes in a bit lower than would be expected. This may also reflect regional preferences in how you subscribe to podcast content since the FeedBurner link is but one way to subscribe. We simply lack data for some means of subscribing to the podcast.

What can I do with having primarily a foreign audience while the content is primarily produced with a domestic US focus? Some changes in content focus may be necessary perhaps. The big problem with that is that we have virtually no budget and are tethered to the south shores of Lake Erie in a township called Ashtabula. We really do not have the assets in place to cover stories in the United Kingdom, New Zealand, and Canada. Expansion of assets would otherwise be necessary and we do not have a way to do so quite just yet.

The fifth year of the program is now underway. I want to make changes this year. A big one would be to secure funding for shortwave distribution. With the lessons of this year in terms of how fragile the Internet is, having a backup is important. Considering how much of the listenership is located outside North America, such would be a viable backup that would also skirt around national blacklists and firewalls.

Getting the resources to cover foreign stories is an even harder thing than simply buying blocks of airtime with money we don't have. Foreign collaborators would be necessary. Without any way to compensate them it is kinda hard to recruit such people. Indigenous correspondents would allow for better coverage anyhow compared to trying to secure a travel budget and visa clearances for international travel. We could previously handle this sort of thing through judicious use of Skype but with as unreliable as Time Warner Cable has been locally we cannot go with that option.

These speed results help illuminate what we are paying USD$39.95 to get:



The easy part is knowing what you want to do. The hard part is finding the resources to bring such to fruition. The search for resources is the big challenge for year five, it seems.

Creative Commons License
Demographic Rambling by Stephen Michael Kellat is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.
Based on a work at erielookingproductions.info.

IT Security For Libraries First In A Series

IT Security In Libraries
8. Social Media Security
7. Practical IT Security
6. Integrating IT Security In Your Library
5. 20 Common Security Myths
4. How To Stay Safe Online
3. Passwords
2. Privacy
1. IT Security Foundations

Today's post is long on theory. I'll argue that most any library can be a target, and present some ideas on how to make things more secure in your library.
My first post will cover privacy, because I think it's closely related to security, and it's something we as librarians take seriously. Then I'll cover a bunch of ways to stay safe online, how to secure your browser, PC and other things you and your patrons use every day. I'll also cover some common security myths. Then we'll talk passwords: everything has a password now, and I want to make sure we all understand what it takes to make your password as secure as possible. Then we'll talk network security for a bit, followed by hardware and PC security. Then I'll focus on security issues that you'll find in your library. And last, but not least, some things I think you'll find interesting that sysadmins do with servers to make things safer for you, and that you'll never see as an end user.

One way to begin thinking about security for your library is by asking yourself few questions:

What do you have to lose?
What does your library & patrons have to lose?
What are the bad guys after?

Coming up with even a few quick answers to these questions can be helpful, I think, because it's important to remember we all have something to lose, and that we all have a part to play in keeping ourselves and our libraries safe.

It's also important to know that, ultimately, there is no such thing as a secure computer. Nothing we do can make things 100% safe. We can just make things safer than they were before. All of the security work we do is about reducing risk. It's about knowing what we're up against. We want to reduce the possible frequency of loss (by securing things as much as possible, given our resources) AND we want to reduce the potential magnitude of loss (by limiting what can be lost as much as possible).

To help set the stage for success we should keep in mind 2 things. "Any lock can be picked", and people are the weakest link in security chain. First, people:

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #160

This week's episode is somewhat light but, then again, we did some technical experimentation. See below: The traditional audio episode is still posted, too. Related links: 10 years ago today BBCWS dropped SW to N America China Radio International now on your local AM station Former Bulgarian foreign minister calls for 'EU WiFi paradise Web censorship moves West: While few may object to blocking access to child pornography, online restrictions set dangerous precedent.

Creative Commons License
Excluding United States Government content incorporated herein, LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #160 by The Air Staff of Erie Looking Productions is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #158

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #151

This week's episode is brief due to cascading countervailing requirements.

Related links:

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #149

This week's episode contains a rather large news review. There wasn't a major connecting thread to the news this week outside the shutdown-that-was-not. Since that fizzled we look at the scattered news bits that deserve consideration. Related links: Last minute tax filing tips (MP3) Groklaw on shutting down Ann Althouse on a tax base challenge Ars Technica on the first step being taken towards passing House Joint Resolution 37 to kill net neutrality regulations The Register on that procedural step HJR 37 underwent Reuters reporting HJR 37 passing the House, moving on for Senate action Michael Geist on the Conservative Party of Canada's digital economy platform The Librarian in Black against DRM The folks at Defective By Design proposing a Librarians Against DRM group The Free Software Foundation, the parent organization of Defective by Design Gawker: Twitter regresses to infancy Dave Winer's screenshot of Twitter backsliding Reuters on the failure at Twitter PCMag Digital Network on the failure at Twitter The Register on MMS being the new killer app in the mobile space DIY server software for interacting with patrons via SMS #1 DIY server software for interacting with patrons via SMS #2 DIY server software for interacting with patrons via SMS #3 Library of Congress Public Affairs on Deanna Marcum being selected for the Melvil Dewey medal Ars Technica on bandwidth caps around the world Deutsche Welle on publishing translations of German works in the US Library of Congress Public Affairs on new entries to the National Recording Registry Radio Netherlands Worldwide's Media Network blog on Google's attempt to reorganize YouTube to compete with broadcast television Russian internal security agency comes out against Skype Russian internal security agency comes out against Hotmail Reuters on the Russian Federal Security Service complaining about web-based off-shore e-mail providers Deutsche Welle on the Berlin prostitute engaging in the trade of negotiable affections to pay for her PhD studies Amy Buckland referencing the new McMaster University librarian's view that PhDs with non-LIS skill sets may be the future of libraries

Creative Commons License
LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #149 by The Air Staff of Erie Looking Productions is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

LISTen: An LISNews.org Podcast -- Episode #148

From this week's script: To you, dear listeners, this has some impact. The first is that any read counts on the site for any particular post should be regarded as utterly fictitious. The second is that you really should be using the FeedBurner target for the podcast rather than subscribing directly to the LISNews PHP-generated feed. The third is that our presence in the iTunes Music Store is a bit off-kilter for now and the downloading of individual episodes through that source is not recommended. That whole discussion of the weirdness on LISNews over the past week as well as an expansive news round-up can be found in this week's episode. Related links: LISNews Netcast Network on gpodder.net An example of illegal narcotics becoming a cash crop Associated Press on current economic woes Deutsche Welle on gender imbalance in Wikipedia editor stats Monty The Dog Greenstone 2.84 released Ann Althouse on the New York Times paywall Teleread on per capita distribution of ebook reading Ars Technica on Google's +1 vote up search ranking system CNET's Caroline McCarthy on Google's +1 vote up search ranking system Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals on their awards nominees in the realm of children's books Evan Prodromou on the launch of Freelish.us Ars Technica on data caps becoming a problem in Canada for Netflix Ars Technica on the reduction in wireline broadband bandwidth caps that resulted in Netflix problems John C. Dvorak on the Internet being the new opiate of the masses Creative Commons License
LISTen: An LISNews.org Podcast -- Episode #148 by The Air Staff of Erie Looking Productions is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

The Desk Setup: A Look At Librarian Computers

The Desk Setup

Like many technologists, I may have had some vague notion that librarians had something to contribute to discussions about information and metadata and standards and access, but my concept of what librarians did and what they knew probably had more to do with stereotypes and anecdote than on an understanding of reality. Which is a shame. Although in the last few years I think we’ve done a really good job of making clearer connections between libraries and technology, I don’t think anyone is surprised when librarians are omitted from discussions about and between prominent technologists, such as the one facilitated by the Setup. (Note: by “librarians” I mean anyone who works in, with, or for libraries. Hat tip to Eli Neiburger for saying what I’d been thinking, only less clearly, for some time before he said those words out loud.)

Programming Notice for LISTen 125

Due to circumstance beyond our control and by decision of the Air Staff of Erie Looking Productions, episode #125 of LISTen: An LISNews.org Podcast shall be delayed in its release until 2130 Eastern Time on October 18th. To convert this to your own local time, please consult TimeAndDate.com at this link: http://timeanddate.com/s/1v87 We apologize for any inconvenience caused hereby.

LISTen: An LISNews.org Podcast -- Episode #121

This week's program brings a zeitgeist update and a miscellany of news items.

Podcasts Without A Fruit-Based Player

Sometimes posts are not easily made to Drupal. Drupal likes text and can be tricky to use if you want to incorporate images into posts. When you have a situation of multiple screenshots to display with text, Adobe Acrobat format can be a better container for such information.

In recognition of that the software & service review article attached to this post is available in Adobe Acrobat format only. Click the download link to access the piece. Podcast subscribers will automatically receive the PDF in their playlist as if it were yet more liner notes.

LISTen: An LISNews.org Podcast -- Episode #116

Strangely enough, this week's episode features appearances from all the air staff. We have an essay about practical electioneering with the New Jersey situation in mind that Andy Woodworth has written about. We also feature readings of a "DJ Read Script" that libraries can give to local radio stations to help keep the fire alive from National Library Week. An interview with the leader of Ubuntu Ohio is also presented as the Lucid Lynx release is discussed.

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