Vendors

Vendors

It's Not About Libraries, It's About Amazon

It's Not About Libraries, It's About Amazon

The Penguin move should be seen not as corporate verdict on libraries, but as a reaction to Amazon's entry into the library market. When Overdrive was distributing content to libraries on their own platform, the publishers were able to view Overdrive, and libraries in general, as a counterweight to Amazon. But the extension of Overdrive lending to the Kindle flipped libraries into the Amazon column. That's the best way to understand the Penguin decision, though you won't see them saying that.

PTFS/LibLime prepared to transfer Koha TM To Koha Foundation

PTFS/LibLime Granted Provisional Use of Koha Trademark in New Zealand
PTFS/LibLime is prepared to transfer the trademark to a non-profit Koha Foundation with the provision that the Foundation hold the trademark in trust and not enforce it against any individual, organization, or company who chooses to promote services around Koha in New Zealand. PTFS/LibLime encourages a direct dialog with Koha stakeholders to determine an equitable solution for the disposition of the trademark that serves the best interests of the libraries who use Koha.

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Plea for help from Horowhenua Library Trust

Plea for help from Horowhenua Library Trust
Horowhenua Library Trust is the birth place of Koha and the longest serving member of the Koha community. Back in 1999 when we were working on Koha, the idea that 12 years later we would be having to write an email like this never crossed our minds. It is with tremendous sadness that we must write this plea for help to you, the other members of the Koha community.

The situation we find ourselves in, is that after over a year of battling against it, PTFS/Liblime have managed to have their application for a Trademark on Koha in New Zealand accepted. We now have 3 months to object, but to do so involves lawyers and money. We are a small semi rural Library in New Zealand and have no cash spare in our operational budget to afford this, but we do feel it is something we must fight.

[Thanks to Brett for the link!]

RIP Steve Jobs

Librarians: Stuck between the rock of the vendors and the hard place of the patrons

Over at Attempting Elegance, Jenica Rogers is "Feeling Pointy":

"I am, professionally and personally, livid; I do not appreciate condescension, eradication of librarians’ professional expertise, or sidestepping of questions that are completely valid in a consumer-seller relationship in which a carefully delineated accreditation relationship is also involved. Our vendors seem to think that going straight to the faculty is going to benefit them, but I don’t understand their logic in sidestepping librarians. We’re the ones with the budgets. We’re the ones they have to work with. Yes, our faculty are influential, key stakeholders and partners, and are the source of our research agenda and teaching and learning needs, but still: How is undermining and alienating the librarian middleman going to help business?

Anger and bewilderment aside, I’m caught between the proverbial rock and hard place — I must support the faculty and students who rely on the research materials published by the ACS. But I must also strive to manage the budgets, resources

Get Ready for the Year Ahead

Libraryworks 2012 calendar goes on sale next month.

Open Source ILS Continues to Expand

Open Source ILS Continues to Expand
The movement toward open source library automation continues. Recent months have seen many announcements of libraries selecting both Koha and Evergreen to replace proprietary systems. Keeping in mind that proprietary ILS products continue to dominate, both in new selections and in the overall base of installed systems, open source library automation has gained a strong footing in the industry and has become a routine option for most types of libraries.

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Who Will Referee the Referee The ACS As Publisher and Approver

Who Will Referee the Referee? — The ACS As Publisher and “Approver”
"How big a deal is this? The conflict of interest is blatant in the case of Chemical Abstracts and Journal of Chemical Education, and it is somewhat subtler in regard to the “Highly Recommended” journal list, 63% of which is comprised of ACS titles. But in both cases the conflict is real, and seems to have gone largely (though not entirely) without public comment up until now. It may be that ACS is handling these conflicts honorably, but how can we know for certain? At the very least, this issue seems to bear more and wider discussion."

Racist titles in EBSCO Academic Search Complete

Racist titles in EBSCO Academic Search Complete

"Now I have no objection to American Renaissance publishing their magazine or website. That is all obviously protected by the First Amendment, and while I dislike what they publish, I wouldn’t suggest that they be stopped from publishing it. But, like my friends who wonder just what it means to their idea of who I am that I now like MMA, I am re-examining my idea of what EBSCO Academic Search Complete is."

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New OverDrive DRM terms: "This message will self-destruct"

New OverDrive DRM terms: "This message will self-destruct"
"This goes a step worse so that each digital "copy" effectively self-destructs after a set number of reads in your system or consortium. That is to say, if you wanted to help blunt the crushing demand for a popular title, this would only help you slightly, if at all. And only one user at a time. And only if your users are faster than the rest of the consortium. After that you (and the rest of your consortium) are straight out of luck. Guess you should have bought more print copies?"

Science Researchers on Google Scholar, Web of Science, and PubMed

Shifting Sands: Science Researchers on Google Scholar, Web of Science, and PubMed, with Implications for Library Collections Budgets , Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship, Fall 2010
Authors: Christy Hightower, Christy Caldwell

A study done by two librarians named Christy at UC Santa Cruz in Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship. Interesting implications for content budgets and publishers...

ProQuest Buys Ebrary

Ebrary, one of the pioneers in aggregating books and other print content online, has been acquired by ProQuest for an undisclosed price. Founded in 1999 by Christopher Warnock and Kevin Sayar, ebrary hosts more than 273,000 digital books, handbooks, reports, maps, journals and other content from about 500 publishers.

Full story

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Librarian's Passive Approach Lets The Market Run Against Our Interests

Librarian's Passive Approach Lets The Market Run Against Our Interests
- We didn’t clearly scope and demand our interests in metadata management, leaving these subscription agencies with valuable metadata that we pay them to ‘manage’ so that they can in turn sell it back to us via A-Z, link-resolver and related add-ons.
- This situation is reinforced by our bungling of the ILS space, namely, allowing the market to move towards extreme vendor lock-in, and overly segmented product offerings (where functionality has been doled out in a dysfunctional ‘pay per use’ model, rather than more organically).
-We’ve missed opportunities to be better organized on consortial purchasing, pricing activism, and stronger leadership towards open access.

A History of the OCLC Tax-Exemption Status

A History of the OCLC Tax-Exemption Status

One of the baffling elements I’ve found in discussions of the history of OCLC is that of its tax exempt status under Ohio law. The latest example of this comes from documents filed in the SkyRiver/Innovative-vs.-OCLC case that make disparaging remarks about how OCLC got its state tax-advantaged status. (The text of the remarks in those documents are included below.) I was curious about this a while back and so did some research on the topic. I had set it aside and forgotten about it until this latest lawsuit brought it up again. So, to set the record straight, here is at least one version — hopefully written from a neutral perspective — of what happened nearly three decades ago.

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Novel-T Literary T-Shirt Contest


From Media Bistro's Galley Cat: For her entry in a t-shirt contest, reader Kristin Walko created an entire t-shirt out of pages from Moby Dick. The final product is pictured above.

Walko entered the Novel-T Photo Contest, a chance to win ten shirts and eight books. All you have to do is post a picture of someone wearing a Novel-T literary t-shirt on the company's Facebook page. The deadline is October 3rd, and the winner will be the picture with the most 'likes' from readers.

Here's more about the entry: "Here's my entry for the totally awesome contest! I may ogle your site each week but I've yet to be so lucky as to own a Novel-T, so this is my go at making my own Ahab shirt! I've fashioned it from pages of the novel itself (which I printed out--no book sacrificing here!). Thanks so much for doing what you folks do!"

Oxford Bibliographies Online: More Rant Than Review

Oxford Bibliographies Online: More Rant Than Review
Oxford is certainly adding value to the work of the scholars who write the content for the OBO. There is significant organizational work (anyone who has edited a scholarly journal knows all about the cat-herding involved) and technical work; I imagine the academics who edit the Subjects do most of the editorial work, and the peer reviewers are minimally compensated. The product looks good and should be easy to use (we haven’t requested a trial). But is Oxford adding value to the tune of $1000 per subject per year? My beloved Jenkins cost me about $40, in paperback (I bought a personal copy), and I don’t have to pay for it annually.

Sony Has Dave Farrow Reading Aloud to Promote Its Readers & Help Canadian Libraries

Dave Farrow, who overcame dyslexia and ADHD to become a world-famous speed reader and Guinness World Record holder, is living and reading in a front window display at the Sony Centre in Toronto. For every book he reads, Sony will donate 2 Reader™ digital books to public libraries across Canada. Watch live on Facebook.

Beginning this past Tuesday, consumers were and are invited to view Farrow's progress and additional world record attempts online (also via Facebook). If you're in the Toronto area, you can also visit the newly renovated Sony Centre for the Performing Arts in person at One Front Street East in Toronto at the south-east corner of Yonge and Front Streets, where Farrow will be reading and living from September 7 through 24th. Consumers who visit the Sony Centre can receive an in-person demonstration of the new Reader Pocket and Touch Editions, "relief-read" for Dave Farrow, enter to win great prizes, and enjoy free frozen yogurt bars from 10:30-1pm daily.

Read more: SONY BRINGS DIGITAL READING EXPERIENCE TO LIFE WITH THE GLOBAL LAUNCH OF ITS STYLISH NEW LINE OF READERS - FierceMobileContent http://www.fiercemobilecontent.com/press-releases/sony-brings-digital-reading-experience-lif...

Watch the Net Neutrality FCC Hearings Thursday Night

Note from Senator Al Franken of MN:

A few weeks ago, Google and Verizon announced a proposed policy framework that they claimed would protect net neutrality, but it does not apply to wireless Internet services. It does not protect net neutrality -- it undermines it.

We've set up a special link so you can watch the hearing, courtesy of the UpTake -- it starts at 6:00 Central Time (7:00 Eastern) tonight.

Please invite your friends to watch by Tweeting and posting to Facebook. This is a big opportunity for us to stand up for net neutrality -- and stand up to big corporations who want to own the flow of information in America.

Not a Day Passes Without Changes in the eBook Market

The maker of a once-hyped e-reader composed of plastic has ended plans to market the device after a sharp drop in the price of Amazon.com Inc.'s (AMZN) Kindle.

Plastic Logic, a startup firm based in Mountain View, CA pulled the plug on its Que e-reader in a widely expected move late Tuesday. The company postponed the release date of the Que several times and canceled preorders in June, triggering speculation that the device would never reach the market. Wall Street Journal reports.

The Que was supposed to be released early this year, but at a starting price of $650, it was unlikely to generate sufficient sales. Consumers can now buy an Amazon Kindle for as little as $139 or spend $500 on an Apple (AAPL) iPad tablet computer that's more powerful but not much bigger than the Que.

Made of high-grade and innovative plastic technology, the Que drew lots of attention in 2009 as the market for e-readers took off. Yet Amazon has cut the price of the Kindle several times since then -- to as low as $139 for a Wi-Fi only version from a high of $359.

"We recognize the market has dramatically changed, and with the product delays we have experienced, it no longer makes sense for us to move forward with our first-generation electronic-reading product," said Plastic Logic Chief Executive Officer Richard Archuleta in a statement. "This was a hard decision, but is the best one for our company, our investors and our customers."

SkyRiver Files Antitrust Suit Against OCLC

SkyRiver Files Antitrust Suit Against OCLC
July 29, 2010
Emeryville, CA—In a move that could have far-reaching implications for competition in the library software and technology services industry, SkyRiver Technology Solutions, LLC has filed suit in federal court in San Francisco against OCLC Online Computer Library Center, Inc. The suit alleges that OCLC, a purported non-profit with a membership of 72,000 libraries worldwide, is unlawfully monopolizing the markets for cataloging services, interlibrary lending, and bibliographic data, and attempting to monopolize the market for integrated library systems, by anticompetitive and exclusionary practices.

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