Ebooks

Ebooks Hardware

Teacher Knows if You’ve Done the E-Reading

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Wed, 04/10/2013 - 00:39
Topic

Several Texas A&M professors know something that generations of teachers could only hope to guess: whether students are reading their textbooks.

They know when students are skipping pages, failing to highlight significant passages, not bothering to take notes — or simply not opening the book at all.

“It’s Big Brother, sort of, but with a good intent,” said Tracy Hurley, the dean of the school of business. (If the intent is good anything goes)

Ebooks are actually not books—schools among first to realize

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Mon, 04/01/2013 - 18:55
Topic

Digital books are triggering tectonic shifts in education. One of the most fundamental, yet seemingly invisible, shifts is happening in the back rooms of district offices—not in the classrooms, not among teachers and students, and definitely not in the board rooms of most big-name publishers and textbook companies.

This profound, significant change is happening first in school district business offices, IT departments, and cubicles among staff members who work behind the scenes to acquire materials for today’s students.

Macmillan Afraid Anyone With A Library Card "never have to buy a book again"

Submitted by Blake on Tue, 03/26/2013 - 08:04

Worries about the effect of libraries on the book trade are not new. But digital devices, which allow books to reach readers with ease and speed, intensify them. As Brian Napack, president of Macmillan, a big publisher, put it in 2011, the fear is that someone who gets a library card will “never have to buy a book again”.

Sci-Fi's Underground Hit

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Wed, 03/13/2013 - 14:53

Authors are snubbing publishers and insisting on keeping e-book rights. How one novelist made more than $1 million before his book hit stores.

Excerpt from article: In a highly unusual deal, Simon & Schuster acquired print publication rights to "Wool" while allowing Mr. Howey to keep the e-book rights himself. Mr. Howey self-published "Wool" as a serial novel in 2011, and took a rare stand by refusing to sell the digital rights. Last year, he turned down multiple seven-figure offers from publishers before reaching a mid-six-figure, print-only deal with Simon & Schuster.

Imagining a Swap Meet for E-Books and Music

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Sat, 03/09/2013 - 13:28
Topic

The paperback of “Fifty Shades of Grey” is exactly like the digital version except for this: If you hate the paperback, you can give it away or resell it. If you hate the e-book, you’re stuck with it.

The retailer’s button might say “buy now,” but you are in effect only renting an e-book — or an iTunes song — and your rights are severely limited. That has been the bedrock distinction between physical and electronic works since digital goods became widely available a decade ago.

Download the Universe: A Year of Science Ebooks

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Tue, 02/26/2013 - 14:51
Topic

Carl Zimmer writes: A year ago, some friends (including my three fellow Phenomena writers) and I put together a web site to review science ebooks. We dubbed it Download the Universe, and we’ve reviewed about 80 titles since then, on everything from avalanches to Leonardo da Vinci. I’ve just written an anniversary post, in which I reflect on what works and doesn’t work in this new medium, and the things that give us as reviewers hope, along with a touch with anger.

DRM Lawsuit Filed By Independent Bookstores Against Amazon, 'Big Six' Publishers

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Fri, 02/22/2013 - 11:49

Three independent bookstores are taking Amazon and the so-called Big Six publishers (Random House, Penguin, Hachette, HarperCollins, Simon & Schuster and Macmillan) to court in an attempt to level the playing field for book retailers. If successful, the lawsuit could completely change how ebooks are sold.

Full article

Used Ebooks, the Ridiculous Idea that Could Also Destroy the Publishing Industry

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Sun, 02/10/2013 - 19:52
Topic

Amazon has a patent to sell used ebooks. When I first scanned the headline, I thought it must be some Onion-esque gag, and I'm sure I wasn't alone. Used e-books? As in, rumpled up, dog-eared pdfs? Faded black-and-white kindle cover art, Calibri notes typed in the margins that you can't erase?