Ebooks

Ebooks Hardware

Why the Smart Reading Device of the Future May Be Paper

http://www.wired.com/2014/05/reading-on-screen-versus-paper/

“Reading is human-technology interaction,” says literacy professor Anne Mangen of Norway’s University of Stavenger. “Perhaps the tactility and physical permanence of paper yields a different cognitive and emotional experience.” This is especially true, she says, for “reading that can’t be done in snippets, scanning here and there, but requires sustained attention.”

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On Her 88th Birthday, Harper Lee Heralds Mockingbird eBook

Mark your literary calendars. Per an announcement today by HarperCollins, on what is author Harper Lee‘s 88th birthday, To Kill a Mockingbird will be available for the first time as an eBook July 8.

http://www.mediabistro.com/fishbowlny/harpercollins-harper-lee-mockingbird-ebook_b211726

How Copyright Laws Keep E-Books Locked Up

Many publishing houses don't allow their products to be lent out by digital libraries for fear of piracy. Articles and books by researchers are also affected. Readers are the ones who have to pay the price.
http://www.spiegel.de/international/zeitgeist/how-copyright-laws-prevent-easy-sharing-of-e-b...

Judge Rules for HarperCollins in Open Road E-Book Dispute

In a significant ruling regarding backlist e-book rights, a New York court this week held that e-book publisher Open Road infringed HarperCollins’ copyright with its e-book edition of Jean Craighead George’s 1973 bestselling children’s book Julie of the Wolves.

“Having accordingly relied on the words of the contract, this Court holds that, by its language, the contract grants to HarperCollins the exclusive right to license electronic publications, a right which was infringed by Open Road in its unlicensed e-book publication of Julie of the Wolves,” held judge Naomi Reice Buchwald.

Full article

Library Consortium Tests Interlibrary Loans of e-Books

http://chronicle.com/article/Library-Consortium-Tests/144743/
Worried about security and sales, many publishers and vendors permit individual e-book chapters to be shared but don’t routinely include the lending of whole e-books in library contracts. Even when licenses do allow e-book lending, libraries typically lack the technology to make it work. You can’t just pop an e-book into an envelope and ship it off by delivery van or the post office.

But lending e-books may soon get easier. This spring a pilot project called Occam’s Reader will test software custom-built to make it both easy and secure for libraries to share e-book files while keeping publishers happy—or so the software’s creators hope.

It's The End Of The Story For Sony's E-Bookstore

It's The End Of The Story For Sony's E-Bookstore
See: Story on NPR

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-e books or -p books...Pick Your Reading Preference

Two authors, Mohsin Hamid and Anna Holmes, weigh in on the pros and cons of e-reading, from the Sunday New York Times.

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A New Year’s Vision of the Future of Libraries as Ebookstores

A New Year’s Vision of the Future of Libraries as Ebookstores
http://www.digitalbookworld.com/2013/a-new-years-vision-of-the-future-of-libraries-as-ebooks...
As the New Year approaches, I have a vision of the future that brings bookstores to every town and invigorates libraries. In this vision, libraries of the future are our local bookstores. I see a future where libraries let people borrow digital books—or buy them.

As Services Track Habits, E-Books Are Reading You

Several new e-book subscription services are analyzing the data of readers and providing it free to writers.

Read full story in the NYT

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Worldreader fights global illiteracy with e-readers

Amazon Offers Readers Early Look at Books With Kindle First

Amazon has introduced Kindle First, a program where customers can access Kindle books a month before their release date.

Story at Teleread

Amazon's Kindle MatchBook Is Out — Will Publishers Opt In?

Amazon launched Kindle MatchBook, a service that lets customers buy steeply discounted ebook versions of books they've already bought in print (from Amazon, of course) on Tuesday. Publishers must opt-in, and as of Wednesday morning, some 75,000 ebooks were available for $2.99 or less.

Story at NPR

Family literacy and K-12 success

Long post by Rothman that hits on family learning, digital libraries, importance of libraries, and a discussion of the book - The Smartest Kids in the World

Although long the article is broken into sections with bold headings.

There is a part where he gives important warnings to public libraries about the development of digital libraries.

Full article

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Family literacy and K-12 success

Long post by Rothman that hits on family learning, digital libraries, importance of libraries, and a discussion of the book - The Smartest Kids in the World

Although long the article is broken into sections with bold headings.

There is a part where he gives important warnings to public libraries about the development of digital libraries.

Full article

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Ebook subscription startup Oyster expands to iPad and opens to all; some stats from Scribd

Ebook subscription startup Oyster expands to iPad and opens to all; some stats from Scribd
“Netflix for ebooks” Oyster launched on iPad and opened up to everybody Wednesday; previously it had only been available on iPhone. Rival service Scribd also released some stats showing that most of its use is coming from iPad.

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The Abomination of Ebooks: They Price People Out of Reading

This is not one of those rants about missing the texture, touch, colors, whatever of paper contrasted with the sterility of reading on a tablet. No, the real abomination of ebooks is often overlooked: Some are so ingrained in the product itself that they are hiding in plain sight, while others are well concealed beneath layers of commerce and government.

The real problem with ebooks is that they’re more “e” than book, so an entirely different set of rules govern what someone — from an individual to a library — can and can’t do with them compared to physical books, especially when it comes to pricing.

The collusion of large ebook distributors in pricing has been a public issue for a while, but we need to talk more about how they are priced differently to consumers and to libraries. That’s how ebooks contribute to the ever-growing divide between the literary haves and have-nots.

Full article

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New E-Book Lending Service Aims To Be Netflix For Books

The website Scribd, online for several years now as a document storehouse, is beginning an e-book subscription service that will offer unlimited e-books for a flat monthly fee. Lynn Neary reports that Scribd is working with HarperCollins, which is the first major American publisher to take part in this kind of subscription service.

Full story

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The Abomination of Ebooks: They Price People Out of Reading

The real problem with ebooks is that they’re more “e” than book, so an entirely different set of rules govern what someone — from an individual to a library — can and can’t do with them compared to physical books, especially when it comes to pricing.
http://www.wired.com/opinion/2013/10/how-ebook-pricing-hurts-us-in-more-ways-than-you-think/

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Kindle Matchbook: discounted e-books for those who own the hard copy

Amazon launches Kindle Matchbook: discounted e-books for those who own the hard copy

if you've bought one of 10,000 selected titles from Amazon, you'll be entitled to snag a digital copy for between $2.99 and nothing. The service launches in October and there's no limit on when the purchases were made -- meaning that you could be offered an awkward reminder of the literature you were gorging back in 1995.

Endgadget press release coverage

A Masterpiece Book on Color Theory Is Now on the iPad

From Wired, "When Josef Albers published Interaction of Color in 1963, it was nothing less than the gateway to an entire way of thinking...But the physical version of the book, which has been circulated primarily in paperback for the last four decades, needed an update. Yale University Press has just done that, by releasing a new iPad version of Albers’ famous texts and color studies. Designed by New York City-based Potion Design, the Interaction of Color app is about as close as most of us will get to the original version of Albers’ masterpiece, which today primarily lives in special collections and museums. The app is nearly an exact digital replica of the 1963 version of the book, down to the original Baskerville typeface and layout of the text columns—but with some 21st century upgrades. “We were really thinking, how can we go back to the original intent of Albers’ book, and make something that he would’ve made today,” says Phillip Tiongson, one of the founders of Potion."

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