Books

Books

Board Votes to Limit Access to Controversial Sex Book

Access to the book, \"It\'s Perfectly Normal\" has been restricted at the Anchorage School District. After listening to several hours worth of testimony by those both for and against such action, the board voted 6-1 to restrict the book. Elementary schoolchildren will only be able to check out the book with parental permission. Those who support the book feel that it provides a candid and honest look at sexual health.\" Others feel that because it contains drawings of people having sex and masturbating, it\'s too explicit for young readers. The meeting drew 100 attendees both from the school and the community. more... from The Anchorage Daily News.

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OCLC Links Catalog with Rare Books Database

In order to assist individuals in locating rare and/or out of print material, OCLC is linking up with Alibris, Inc., a California based rare book database firm. Customers of Alibris will be able to use OCLC\'s World Cat to search for material in libraries. more...

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Stephen King Banned in Florida Middle School

Stephen King\'s book \"Different Seasons\" (which contains the novellas The Body and Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption) has been pulled from a middle school library shelf.


\"West Hernando Middle School has decided to limit the availability of a second Stephen King book after a student was offended by the prison rape scenes in a story that was the basis for the movie The Shawshank Redemption.

A committee of parents, students and staff decided Thursday to pull Different Seasons, a 1982 compilation of four King stories, from shelves accessible to students. Now, it will be kept in a room accessible only to teachers.\"

Read the
full story
from St Petersburg Times

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American Girl Literary Theatre

The Chicago Tribune has an article about the new stage show at the American Girl Place complex in town. I\'m posting this because of a quote from the AG theater director:

"We have a wonderful library of literature, and, as with a lot of theater that is based on literature, our goal is to create the best piece of entertainment we can from that base."

Yeah, but how much theater is based on literature based on expensive dolls?

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English Teachers Organize Opposition to Book Bans

A number of Louisiana English teachers have spoken out against their school\'s decision to suspend two classics. The teachers had placed \"The Chocolate War\" by Robert Comier and \"The Great Santini\" by Pat Conroythe on required reading lists for student assignments. more... from The Shreveport Times.

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Finding hope between the covers of a book

Sun-Sentinel.com has One on \"bibliotherapy\" that seems to be coming increasingly popular now. They say \"When looking for ways to help kids and teens express their feelings, literature can help us win the battle in an uncertain war.\"


\"I\'m no psychologist, but I know all the coverage given to the attacks has made me feel on edge,\" says Moon-Fuchs. \"I\'m sure it\'s been hard for kids.\"

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After 38 Years Book Found Back on the Shelf

Another missing book report from Ananova. The book last checked out in 1963 was found back on the shelf by library staff while \"tidying up.\" Although the fine would be around 1,300 pounds, the book cost 121/2 pence in its day. If Derbyshire librarians tidy up as infrequently as I do, the book could very well have been returned 30 years ago. With all the stories about really overdue library books, one wonders what other books are still checked-out from the previous century.

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Suggested reading to understand crisis

The Seattle Times has A Nice List of books recommended by By Mary Ann Gwinn the Seattle Times book editor.


So if you\'re looking for books that may help you understand the 9/11 events, check out these books on Islam, the Middle East, terrorism, American foreign policy and other topics.

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Libraries Plan Reading of Banned Books

In light of the recent terrorist attacks on our nation\'s freedom, the Farmington, ME Public Library and the University of Maine have joined forces to promote the reading of banned books. The following state appears on the library association\'s web site: \"At a time when terrorists have attacked our country, America\'s freedoms could be in jeopardy as well. This library is is proud to celebrate one of those freedoms — the freedom to read.\"
more... from Maine Today.

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Terror Attacks Boost More Book Sales

Cavan McCarthy passed along this Ananova Story on more books that are selling well since last week.

Professor Angus Gillespie\'s Twin Towers: The Life of New York City\'s World Trade Centre, had sold just 2,000 copies before Tuesday and now the remaining 1,000 sold out within 24 hours of the attack. Amazon.com says that Barbara Olson\'s book about Hilary Clinton has sold out (She, Olson, was on one of the hijacked planes).

I assume this is true at libraries as well?

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Nostradamus Flying Off the Shelves

It seems that books on or by Nostradamus are flying off library shelves in some places. A number of e-mail messages have been surfacing about this attack having been predicted by Nostradamus during the 1500s as the beginning of WW III and or possibly the end of the world. A visit to Urban Legends will yield more information on that and other Internet hoaxes. more...

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Two \'Instant\' Books on 9/11 to be Published

The Nando Times reports on two new \'instant\' books on 9/11. One is to be a collection of literary pieces on America and the other a compilation of stories from survivors and eyewitnesses. The first is due out by the end of the year, while the second is due September 30th. It\'s good to know the America\'s capitalism continues strong in the face of any challenge.

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Clancy-fied information

During NBC\'s coverage of the attack Tuesday morning, Katie Couric asked Gen. Norman Schwartzkopf something like: Did anyone consider that airliners could be used as weapons by terrorists like this? Schwartzkopf\'s reply: Tom Clancy wrote a book about it.

In Debt of Honor, a 747 is crashed into the U.S. Capitol. Clancy discussed the scenario briefly in a 1997 interview (scroll down about halfway). I really like what he says here: "The fundamental strength of America is not in Washington. It\'s in Peoria, Illinois, in Baltimore, Maryland, in Sacramento, California and all the places where Americans work and do business."

I read somewhere that Clancy was interviewed on CNN on Tuesday, but I don\'t see a transcript on CNN.com. Has anyone run across it? Also, are libraries experiencing increased patron interest in Debt of Honor and its follow-up, Executive Orders?

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Reading to kids is good

In a short interview in the Chicago Tribune, Jim Trelease, the author of Read-Aloud Handbook, talks about the benefits of reading to kids. Nice plug for libraries, too: "A public library card is a ticket to the richest entertainment a child\'s mind is ever going to have."

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Middle English Dictionary Project Complete

After 71 years, the Middle English Dictionary Project has born fruit:

The dictionary covers 15,000 pages and includes more than 55,000 entries. The numerous meanings and usages are illustrated with 900,000 quotations ranging from the time of William the Conqueror to the advent of printing. They come from Chaucer, the stories of King Arthur and early Bibles, as well as contemporary letters, wills and remarkably detailed medical treatises.

The Middle English Dictionary is \"a labor of love . . . that is practically unrivaled in scale by any historical dictionary project of the modern era--and perhaps of any reference work project as well,\" said Richard Ekman, a former officer with the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which since 1975 has provided the bulk of the financing for the $22-million project. . .

More from the Los Angeles Times . Thanks to Slashdot.

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The first National Book Festival

It\'s the first National Book Festival. It takes place on Saturday, September 8, on the grounds of the Library of Congress and the U.S. Capitol, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and will celebrate the joys of reading.


The Have a WebCast if you can\'t make it.

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One Book, One Chicago Update

Always alert Bob Cox sent along This Story from the Chicago Tribune on The citywide \"One Book, One Chicago\" program.

The Mockingbird has flown off the shelves at book stores and libraries around Chicago Land, and a daily, e-mail quiz on the book is being conducted in the Office of Budget and Management in Chicago City Hall.

The windy city has certainly taken wing to this book.

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Read -- or decorated a room with -- any good books

Cornelia passed along This One from the Chicago Tribune.


It\'s a fun look at just how cool it looks to have books around.

\"Nothing says taste and intelligence quite like books. The set of NBC\'s \"Today\" show also includes a goodly portion of books arranged discreetly on a shelf, as if to suggest that Kate and Matt are passionate bibliophiles. In the shadow of books, everyone looks smarter.\"

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Billington Interview on National Book Fest

Cliff Urr writes \"Diane Rehm talks with James Billington, Librarian of Congress since 1987, about the upoming National Book Festival, hosted by First Lady Laura Bush, and about the resources and mission of the world\'s largest library.


Realaudio Link.

National Book Festival link: loc.gov/bookfest \"

For some odd reason everytime I hear about the LOC I get thirsty for a Coke, is that wrong?

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Libraries hold key to deterring illiteracy

Laura Bush and James H. Billington [you should know who they are] have ganged up and written an Announcement piece in the USA Today.


They will be hosting the first National Book Festival on Saturday at the Library of Congress in Washington. It\'s intended to be a celebration of the crucial role books and reading have in our individual lives and in the democracy that we cherish.

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