Library 2.0

Library 2.0

The Story of Library 0.0

Submitted by effinglibrarian on Mon, 02/04/2008 - 05:32

Library Zero point Zero.

We all seem to know what Library 1.0 is/was since we continue to tell everyone how 2.0 we are, and some of us have even begun formulating lies for why we're past that and ready to declare ourselves 3.0.

But what about the past; what about the before time? How would we classify the earliest forms of librarianship? I'm trying to understand how Library 2.0 applies to history. At what point can we say that the ideas for a library existed?

Library Zero point Zero

Submitted by effinglibrarian on Sat, 02/02/2008 - 06:20
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We all seem to know what Library 1.0 is/was since we continue to tell everyone how 2.0 we are, and some of us have even begun formulating lies for why we're past that and ready to declare ourselves 3.0.

But what about the past; what about the before time? How would we classify the earliest forms of librarianship? I'm trying to understand how Library 2.0 applies to history. At what point can we say that the ideas for a library existed?

If we define Library 1.0 as the point where a form of the modern library exists and Library 0.0 is when no ideas for libraries exist, then what falls in between?

Recent excavations have revealed the discovery of an ancient stone pendant to support this theory (see image on my page). Speculation is that early librarians were recognized by wearing a symbol of the goddess Tanit; because it was easy to draw and seen as further proof of early librarianship because of its relationship to clip art and Ellison die cuts.

The earliest libraries were called Marypedia, or Maripedia (or pedians). And beginning with Library 0.2 Maripedia, they promoted their services by wearing variations of the pendant. Although the original Mary was obviously a “zero-point-twopian,” the discovered pendant displays “0.3.” The owner of this pendant clearly saw herself as apart from the other Maripedia, and was probably viewed, like today, as an ahole.

Kindles can't be lent!

Submitted by zzshupinga on Mon, 01/28/2008 - 16:15

According to Rochelle , who talked to Amazon customer support, libraries that are lending out Kindles (Amazon's ebook reader) to patrons are in violation of the terms of service. She makes some compelling points on questions that Amazon needs to answer, such as ways to disable people from downloading without disabling the account.

Young vs. not so young in technology

Submitted by zzshupinga on Wed, 01/23/2008 - 12:18

An article wasreleased today on young adults vs. the not so young and "tehcnological turf." More young adults are finding not only their friends on Facebook and Myspace, but their parents and grandparents. Gone are the days where they had to walk their parents through how to use a computer, now they want to be "friends" on Facebook or IM. This has raised some issues for young people interviewed in the article, as they try to find a space that adults can't see every move they make.

Library 2.0 Debased

Submitted by Blake on Thu, 01/17/2008 - 14:24

John Blyberg Has Been Feeling, for awhile now, that the term Library 2.0 has been co-opted by a growing group of libraries, librarians, and particularly vendors to push an agenda of “change” that deflects attention from some very real issues and concerns without really changing anything. It’s very evident in the profusity of L2-centric workshops and conferences that there is a significant snake-oil market in the bibliosphere. We’re blindly casting about for a panacea and it’s making us look like fools.

"I'm Sorry, that's a video of *What*?"

Submitted by effinglibrarian on Thu, 01/10/2008 - 09:55
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I just realized why I had to make a video called a cute furry animal recites George Carlin's "seven dirty words" (which is an ADULTS ONLY video with 7 dirty words in it, duh) -- remember what David Lee King said about the library of the future (which is actually from RWW and about the "sexy librarian of the future")?

Imagine a future when you go to the library with a 5 minute video you've just made about last night's Presidential debates and that librarian says to you:
You should upload it to YouTube and tag it with these four tags - two broad and two more specific to existing communities of interest on YouTube and the topic of your video. Then you should embed that video in a blog post along with some text introducing it and linking to some of your favorite posts by other people who have also written today about the Presidential debates. Make sure to send trackbacks to those posts!
Now, I think this is a particularly good video on the topic, so if you're interested I will vote for it on StumbleUpon (as a sexy librarian I have a very powerful account there) and give it a good summary explanation. Any of those are steps you can take that will make your work all the easier for people to discover.

A new search engine...

Submitted by zzshupinga on Mon, 01/07/2008 - 20:52

Sarah, from LibrarianInBlack, shares this cool search engine that I hadn't seen before. It's called Carrot, and not only is it open source (so you can use it on your library's website), but it clusters results together. What I mean by this is try searching for the term Harry Potter. Over on the side they divide topics up so that you can narrow results by title of books or wands.

Gen y in the library

Submitted by zzshupinga on Sun, 12/30/2007 - 19:15

All the talk about how libraries are losing the younger generation is apparently just that...talk. A survey done by Pew Internet & American Life Project found that the biggest group is actually Generation Y, the 18-30 year olds. While they may no longer be using the library for what we would call "traditional" reasons, they are using the library.