Library 2.0

Library 2.0

New LIS-based Podcast: The Knitting Librarian

Announcing a new(ish) podcast for librarians: The Knitting Librarian. The knitting librarian combines all things sticks and string with all things library and information science. Segments include: The Big News of the Day (show notes only), Knitting Update, This Week in LIS, Me me me me, and the Awesome Sauce. Episodes released biweekly.

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New LIS-based Podcast: The Knitting Librarian

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Announcing a new(ish) podcast for librarians: The Knitting Librarian. The knitting librarian combines all things sticks and string with all things library and information science. Segments include: The Big News of the Day (show notes only), Knitting Update, This Week in LIS, Me me me me, and the Awesome Sauce. Episodes released biweekly.

Bookfuturism: The Future or the Present?

"A futurist (in Marinetti's original sense) wants to burn down libraries. A bookfuturist wants to put video games in them. "

Another take relevant to the "Libraries 2.0" idea: Tim Carmody outlines "A Bookfuturist Manifesto" in the Atlantic. Carmody describes a philosophical compromise between the print-devoted book lovers and the cutting edge technophiles.

Are we finally on the cusp of an understanding between the two, or is this a new-fangled name for an already established shift?

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Chicago Underground Library's Community-Based Approach to Collecting and Cataloging on Museum 2.0

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Chicago Underground Library's Guest Post on Museum 2.0: <a href=" http://museumtwo.blogspot.com/2010/08/guest-post-nell-taylor-on-chicago.html">A Community-Based Approach to Collecting and Cataloging</a> Chicago Underground Library is a replicable model for community archives that accepts every piece of print media from a certain area without making quality or importance judgments, going back as far in history as possible. That means we collect university press, handmade artist books, zines made by sixth graders, poetry chapbooks from big names published in tiny local presses, and self-published poetry chapbooks sold for a dollar on the street. We have neighborhood newspapers, internationally-renowned magazines of political commentary, and three View-Master reels of Chicago hot dog stands, neon signs, and motor inns, respectively.

Libraries Lead the eBook Revolution

Have you read an e-book yet? Do you think it means the end of bookshops and libraries as we know them? Will book people have to turn into e-book people to meet the brave new world? It's all a bit early to say.

I [Philip Harvey, see below] haven't read an e-book and when asked by borrowers if I feel that my profession of librarian is under threat, I ask them if they themselves have used an e-book. No, is the consistent reply. But they know chapter and verse about the developments, usually from what they have seen on the internet. The new slimline gadgets can display everything a text maniac wants to get their hands on. Or so it seems.

More on ebooks, Google, digitisation, and the Information Revolution from Philip Harvey, President of the Australian and New Zealand Theological Library Association in Australia's Eureka Street.

Library 2.0 on ning going away

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Effective Thursday evening, Feb. 25, 2010, I will be closing down Library 2.0 on Ning, http://library20.ning.com . The network has not seen much traffic the last few months and most people requesting to join are posting profiles full of link spam. The return is no longer worth the work. I am not transferring it to anyone else. I want to freeze and archive the contents in some way. Thursday I will be suspending all members of the network. The content will remain but no one will be able to post to it.

Deconstructing Library 2.0

I realize I’m relatively new to the library scene as a second career librarian, so some of what I’m asking may have been covered somewhere already. I’m fine with being corrected in the comments (since there is no better way to learn than to question), but I’m still going to ask.

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Scholars Use Social-Media Tools to Hold Online Academic Conference

"More than 100 researchers interested in the emerging field of the social history of computer programming are running what may be the first academic conference held entirely using Web 2.0 tools.

Emerging Trends and Technologies in Libraries and Information Services Blog

The aim of the International Symposium on Emerging Trends and Technologies in Libraries and Information Services (ETTLIS-2010) is, once again, to bring researchers, academicians, business community and research scholars on a common platform to share their experiences, innovative ideas and research findings about the aspects of emerging trends and technologies in the field of knowledge resource centres and information services.

Access blog at: ETTLIS 2010 http://ettlis2010.ning.com/profiles/blog/list

13 Ways (and 147 Tools) to Help Your Library Save Money on Technology

13 Ways (and 147 Tools) to Help Your Library Save Money on Technology
This list has come out of a few different presentations I’ve given for public libraries recently, from Hawaii to Iowa. Take a look, see what you want to try, and let me know how it works. The list is not exhaustive, so I invite all of you to comment on this post and add your own favorite free web tools, software, and open source awesomeness.

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Library Journal's headlines as soon as they are posted with LJ’s RSS feed.

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Library Journal - Latest News
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FCC Seeks Data From US Libraries Among Others

The Impact of the Digital World on Cataloging Systems

Librarians: at "Bargaining" in the grief cycle

In response to Restore the Noble Purpose of Libraries, by William H. Wisner:

I'm sorry to tell you, Mr. Wisner, but the Noble Library is dead.

It died when my local library purchased a vinyl copy of the album KC and the Sunshine Band back in 1976. Yes, I agree "Boogie Shoes" is an awesome song, but I have to place the death of the traditional, noble, enlightened library at that ignoble event. Up to then, the library never bought any popular music: no Led Zepellin or Rolling Stones or The Who or David Bowie. There were only albums of Prokofiev, Mozart or the Boston Pops.

And librarians have been dealing with the loss for the last thirty years.

The Kübler-Ross Five Stages of Grief are: Denial, Anger, Bargaining, Depression, and Acceptance. And librarians are smack in the middle of this process.

Some say the Denial stage is still ongoing, but I'm pretty sure it ended around the time your library made you learn about the "23 Things" and "Library 2.0." If creating ten different online accounts and solving the accompanying CAPTCHAs didn't shake you from that initial defensive response, then you're so deluded you probably think The Beatles will still get back together one day (all four of them).

Catalog 2.0: Your Library Catalog in a Global Environment

The State Library of Kansas cataloged about 1,000 Wikipedia articles analytically at the State Library providing links via the Kansas Library Catalog, WorldCat/OCLC and the State Library’s consortium OPAC, ATLAS. Most all of the Wikipedia articles they've cataloged are concerned with Kansas, Kansans or current topics with few resources initially available via standard library resources. They had one of the first records in WorldCat/OCLC linking to information on then-Supreme-Court-nominee, John G. Roberts, as well as an early record on Hurricane Katrina. They followed these entries with other cataloging records accessing more substantive resources, but yes, the initial records were for Wikipedia articles.

Arizona Library Students Are Diggin' DigIn

Dewey decimal system, welcome to the digital age.

The University of Arizona's School of Information Resources and Library Science (SIRLS) received a grant that will allow for students to become tech savvy librarians according to U of A's Daily Wildcat.

The $910,000, received from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, goes to the SIRLS "Promoting Diversity in the Digital Curation Disciplines" project.

According to the IMLS, "DigIn" (is an online) graduate certificate program to train library professionals to create, collect, and manage digital information."

Those who complete the program will take their knowledge to rural communities, and be able to create new and easier ways for patrons to find information at libraries and other information institutions. It's not simply learning how to work the internet or Microsoft's Word, they will be learning new ways of finding information and using technology to better assist people in getting that information, officials said.

Hey U, Tune In: The LOC Is Now on iTunes U

Library of Congress iTunes. Blog. Twitter. YouTube. iTunes. Yeah, we speak Web 2.0.

You nation’s Library has millions of stories to tell, so we’re trying to tell them as many places and to as many people as possible–whether on our own website or elsewhere. And now you can add another biggie to the list: iTunes U.

For those who don’t know, iTunes U is an area of the iTunes Store offering free education audio and video content from many of the world’s top universities and other institutions. (The iTunes application is needed to access iTunes U, and is a free download from www.apple.com/itunes.)

The Library’s iTunes U page launched today with a great deal of content, with much more to come. (Link opens in iTunes.) A nice bonus, for those in the know, is that the content is downloadable and even includes materials such as PDFs.

So as long as people keep finding new ways to get information, we’re going to keep finding ways to get it to you!

Las Vegas-area Editor's Patron Perspective On Self-Check

Andrew Kiraly, Managing Editor of Las Vegas-area publication CityLife, contributed a commentary to local NPR affiliate KNPR. The commentary takes about the technological muscle present at libraries and laments the increasing lack of human interaction at storehouses of human creative output. The four minute and twelve seconds piece can be streamed directly and directly downloaded.

Outsourcing outreach

Wandering through the iTunes Music Store, I noticed multiple library science-related podcasts that have faded out of existence. Programs like Uncontrolled Vocabulary and LibVibe no longer exist as going concerns. Some programs seem to potentially still exist but have gaps between episodes ranging between seven and ten months. Library Geeks shows gaps of up to ten months between individual episodes. LIS Radio from the University of Missouri-Columbia has not released a podcast since February 2009 and their webcast calendar is currently devoid of entries.

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