Rare Books

Rare Books

Descendants Tussle Over Steinbeck Manuscripts and Artifacts

Submitted by birdie on Tue, 06/22/2010 - 15:52

From The Californian: Caught off guard by news that John Steinbeck memorabilia will be auctioned off in New York on Wednesday, the author's son and daughter-in-law are raising money on the fly to bid for items and bring them to Salinas.

Santa Barbara-based Thom Steinbeck and Gail Steinbeck had raised $4,600 as of Monday from a list of contributors that included auto dealership owner Sam Linder and CIA Director Leon Panetta. Their goal is $15,000.

Bloomsbury Auctions announced last Wednesday that a collection of Steinbeck manuscripts, photographs and artifacts valued from $200,000 to $250,000 will be put to bid. The items trace back to a New York apartment the author shared with his third wife, Elaine Steinbeck, in the 1950s and 1960s. After she died in 2003, they came into the possession of Elaine's children from a prior marriage to Zachary Scott, Gail Steinbeck said.

Those heirs, with the aid of literary agents McIntosh & Otis, arranged for the auction, Steinbeck said.

It's a bone of contention between two sides of the family. Disputes over possession of particular items have been hashed out in court for eight years.

Librarian Retrieves Stolen First Folio

Submitted by birdie on Mon, 06/21/2010 - 13:24

Richard Kuhta, a librarian at the Folger Shakespeare Library has described the "heart dropping" moment he realised an ancient Shakespeare first edition he'd been asked to authenticate by a County Durham man was a priceless relic stolen a decade earlier.

Staff at the world renowned Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington DC called in the British Embassy, Durham Police and the FBI after being given the badly damaged book by Raymond Scott in 2008.

A Gentle Reminder to Special-Collections Curators

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Fri, 04/30/2010 - 17:44
Topic

Let this, then, serve as a gentle reminder to rare-book curators that your job is not to keep readers from your books but just the opposite: to facilitate readers' use of the collections. If altruism or professional integrity aren't sufficient motivators to get you to play nice, you might consider the fact that you have a job only because people want to read what's in those collections, and you will keep your job for only as long as readers feel welcome to approach you to make use of the materials.

Our First President Was a Scofflaw...Overdue Books!

Submitted by birdie on Sat, 04/17/2010 - 08:53

He may have never told a lie, but George Washington apparently had no problem stiffing a Manhattan library on two books.

Two centuries ago, the nation's first President borrowed two tomes from the New York Society Library on Manhattan's Upper East Side (New York City being the Nation's Capital at the time) and never returned them, racking up an inflation-adjusted $300,000 late fee.

A Rare ‘Jungle Book’ Resurfaces in Britain

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Mon, 04/12/2010 - 17:24

Librarians for Britain’s National Trust have discovered a rare first edition of Rudyard Kipling’s “Jungle Book,” BBC News reported. Officials of the trust said the book contained a handwritten note from the author to his daughter Josephine, who died in 1899, when she was 6.

Full piece here

Here is another article that shows a picture of the inscription.

Charles Dickens Library Exhibit & Discovery Of 2 previously unknown letters from him

Submitted by Blake Carver (not verified) on Thu, 03/18/2010 - 18:32

Slumming With Charles Dickens: New York Library Relives His American Tours
snippet: "The staging of Dickens In America led to the discovery of two heretofore unknown personal letters written by Dickens to John Bigelow in the 1860's."