Book Stores

Book Stores

Stephen King ‘horrified’ by loss of his manuscripts in bookstore flooding

Gerald Winters’ bookstore, which specializes in rare and limited edition copies of King’s books, was among the handful of businesses damaged by flooding from the broken pipe in front of 46 Main St. “I’m horrified. As a book lover, my heart goes out to him,” King told the Bangor Daily News on Wednesday. “I will eventually reach out and see if I can help in any way.”
From Stephen King ‘horrified’ by loss of his manuscripts in bookstore flooding — Arts & Culture — Bangor Daily News — BDN Maine
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Reading Suggestions from a Michigan Bookseller, Books from Shithole Countries

Petosky’s McLean and Eakin Booksellers have borrowed a phrase from the Commander in Chief to promote the reading of books from Haiti and Africa. They are continuing to take suggestions.

The populism of Amazon’s real-world bookstores

Walking around, I half-expected to see SQL queries accompanying some of the displays — “SELECT * FROM books WHERE rating > 4.8 AND pub_year = 2017 ORDER BY number_sold”. Amazon definitely needs to figure out how to get a little weird into their stores, a little of the human touch. Toning down the data talk would help. A more casual typeface might work too — not Comic Sans but perhaps something at least approaching handwritten? They’ve got so so much data about how people buy books…they just need to be more clever about how they slice and dice it. Maybe look for books that exhibit the Napoleon Dynamite Problem? Find people with interesting wishlists?
From The populism of Amazon’s real-world bookstores

Seattle Mystery Bookshop: Why the Seattle Mystery Bookshop Must Close

Why? There are so many reasons. Blame Amazon? Sure, that’s the easy thing to say but the massive changes in the world of bookselling are far larger than that. In fact, the changes in the over-all economy make it a much, much bigger story.
From Seattle Mystery Bookshop: Why the Seattle Mystery Bookshop Must Close
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Texas Aggieland Bookstore no longer selling books

A longtime College Station business is making a big change. The Texas Aggieland Bookstore is no longer selling books. Buying textbooks for college classes isn't how it used to be. "I find it easier just to get on my tablet and have my books on there," said Texas A&M student Zachary Williams. He wasn't surprised that the Texas Aggieland Bookstore is pulling textbooks from shelves.
From Texas Aggieland Bookstore no longer selling books
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UK Book sales the week before Christmas were highest in 10 years

Christmas trading for the UK book market saw its strongest sales in 10 years, new figures have revealed.  Nielsen BookScan reports that a total of £83.3m worth of print books were sold in the run-up to Christmas, which marks the highest since 2007.
From Book sales the week before Christmas were highest in 10 years | The Independent
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Barnes & Noble holiday sales sink as coloring-book fad fades

Barnes & Noble Inc. posted its first decline in holiday sales in three years, hurt by a downturn in the coloring-book category, bringing another sign that the Christmas season wasn’t kind to retailers. Same-store sales sank 9.1 percent for the nine-week holiday period, the New York-based company said on Thursday. Coloring books and other art supplies — products that had surged last year in part because adults were embracing them — were particularly weak. Still, Barnes & Noble expects to bolster its operating profit by keeping a tight lid on expenses.
From Barnes & Noble holiday sales sink as coloring-book fad fades – The Denver Post
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"We set out to build the bookstore of the 21st century"

Among the factors that have made Kepler’s a sustainable operation, two stand out. First, Madan and his team have built on the store’s heritage as a place that achieves impact not just as a book retailer but also as a community center. And second, they have explored the potential of using a hybrid structure that combines for-profit and nonprofit elements.
From Turning the Page | Stanford Social Innovation Review
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In plot twist, independent bookstores survive forecasted doom

Independent bookstores like hers seem to have turned the page on predictions of their economic doom. The American Booksellers Association reports that sales nationally rose by more than 10 percent in 2015 compared to the same period a year earlier and sales in the first two quarters on 2016 remained strong. Blue Willow, too, has seen a 5 percent uptick each of the past couple of years.
From In plot twist, independent bookstores survive forecasted doom - Houston Chronicle
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Welcome to The Last Bookstore

Great video of the owner of LA's Last Bookstore (11 & 1/2 minutes but worth it)

Marcus Books is coming back to San Francisco

We are pleased to announce an event on Aug. 16, 2016, to celebrate the union of Marcus Books and the African American Arts and Culture Complex (AAACC) in the Fillmore District of San Francisco. Over the past few months, Marcus Books and the African American Arts and Culture Complex have been collaborating on the details of their new partnership which will manifest as a bookstore within the first floor lobby of the complex.
From San Francisco Bay View » Marcus Books is coming back to San Francisco
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The world's cities with the most bookstores and libraries per capita

Over the past two years, 18 cities have reported how many bookstores they have, and 20 have reported on their public libraries. Hong Kong leads the pack with 21 bookshops per 100,000 people, though last time Buenos Aires sent in its count, in 2013, it was the leader, with 25. New York does OK, with around 840 bookstores for 8.4 million people, but London, whose population is only slightly bigger than New York, counts only 360 stores.
From The world's cities with the most bookstores and libraries per capita — Quartz

Buenos Aires's El Ateneo bookstore: Books fill the balconies in this 100-year-old theater

Built in 1919 (Spanish), the theater was designed by architects Peró and Torres Armengol, with its dome, which remains today, created by Italian painter Nazareno Orlandi. The theater’s performances included tango, until 1929, when it became a cinema house. In 2000, the gorgeous theater was converted to a bookstore, and today it stocks around 120,000 books in its balconies, boxes, and former orchestra area. While that may not sound like much compared to the 2 million titles at New York’s Strand Book Store, the Ateneo has an ambiance all its own.
From Buenos Aires's El Ateneo bookstore: Books fill the balconies in this 100-year-old theater — Quartz
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Tunnel of Books: Curved Shelves Wrap Bookstore Walls & Ceiling

Paired to fantastic effect, a series of arch-forming shelving units and a black-mirrored floor create a wraparound tunnel in a Chinese bookstore, punctuated by a fracture leading visitors through the resulting passageway.
From Tunnel of Books: Curved Shelves Wrap Bookstore Walls & Ceiling | Urbanist
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B&N to Sell Self-Published Books In Stores

The big news about Barnes & Noble is that after twenty years of battling with Amazon they have finally made a competitive move that Amazon cannot match. Barnes & Noble, with 640 bookstores in 50 states, is giving self-published authors a chance to get access to their hallowed bookshelves. Meanwhile, Amazon runs one bookstore in Seattle (albeit with 3 more slated). Barnes & Noble wins this contest hands down. The news reads best at a quick glance: “…authors have the opportunity to sell their print books at Barnes & Noble stores across the country… participate at in-store events including book signings and discussions, where they will be able to sell their print books and meet fans.”
From B&N to Sell Self-Published Books In Stores
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The Secret History of Holywell Street: Home to Victorian London’s Dirty Book Trade

Victorian sexuality is often considered synonymous with prudishness, conjuring images of covered up piano legs and dark ankle-length skirts. Historian Matthew Green uncovers a quite different scene in the sordid story of Holywell St, 19th-century London’s epicentre of erotica and smut.
From The Secret History of Holywell Street: Home to Victorian London’s Dirty Book Trade | The Public Domain Review
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Interview with a Bookstore: Galiano Island Books, on a tiny Canadian island

The owners of this family-run bookshop on Galiano Island (population 1,258) talk about getting bitten by the ‘bookstore bug’ and surreal customer exchanges
From Interview with a Bookstore: Galiano Island Books, on a tiny Canadian island | Books | The Guardian
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Capitol Hill Books Has DC's Most Curmudgeonly Store Owner

Capitol Hill Books’ Jim Toole (“If you have to put an age down, say 110”) had already lived a fairly full life before he took on running the secondhand book shop after its original owner passed away in 1994—he earned a degree in history from UCLA, a masters from American University, and served in the Navy for 30 years. Now he says he spends 85 to 90 hours a week tending to and stocking the stuffed-to-the-brim store across the street from Eastern Market, which he expanded to fill the basement and top floor of the rowhouse.
From Capitol Hill Books Has DC's Most Curmudgeonly Store Owner | Washingtonian
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People are hungry for real bookstores - Judy Blume on why US indie booksellers are thriving

Blume doesn’t have to write because, at 78, she has embarked on a new career: she’s an independent bookseller. Together with her husband, George Cooper, she has opened a small, nonprofit bookshop in Key West, Florida, where she’s working almost every day. And she’s loving it. She had planned “to take a gap year” after she finished writing and promoting her last novel, In the Unlikely Event. “I was going to relax and read and have this whole time with no pressure. And then bingo – the chance comes along to open a bookshop, and there you go. I guess I like that in my life … To learn something new like this, at 78, makes it all the more exciting.”
From 'People are hungry for real bookstores': Judy Blume on why US indie booksellers are thriving | Books | The Guardian
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Chill. It’s Not Books vs. Amazon. You Can Have Both!

According to Wired, books, and bookstores, can coexist with the dominant e-tailer Amazon just fine thank you.

"Print books have persisted, but ebooks are not going away. Amazon is powerful, but physical bookstores are still here. The book is not immune to the powerful digital forces that have re-shaped so much of the rest of the world. At the same time, books have been able to resist the forces of change because books really are different."

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