Armed Man Shot While Attempting to Enter NC Public Library

WILMINGTON, NC -- A Wilmington, North Carolina, police officer shot a man downtown Thursday afternoon after police received a report of a “subject with a gun.”... According to New Hanover County Sheriff’s Lt. Jerry Brewer, the man being pursued apparently fled through the parking deck. When he attempted to run into the New Hanover County Public Library across Chestnut Street, he was stopped by a sheriff’s deputy who works there. More at <a href="http://www.starnewsonline.com/news/20170907/breaking-wilmington-officer-shoots-armed-man-downtown">Star News</a>

Scientists find languages not used since Dark Ages among ancient manuscripts recovered from monastery

Languages not seen since the Dark Ages have come to light after scientists used a new method to inspect a trove of ancient manuscripts found in a monastery in Egypt. They turned up extremely rare tongues, including Caucasian Albanian, on documents they found in Saint Catherine’s monastery on the Sinai peninsula that date back 1,500 years. Monks originally wrote their texts down on parchments which were later scrubbed off and used to write the Bible by future generations who spoke in more modern languages.
From Scientists find languages not used since Dark Ages among ancient manuscripts recovered from monastery | The Independent
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"Do You Miss Me Yet?" - Reestablishing the Corporate Librarians

It almost never fails when I run into someone I used to work with. The conversation starts with "Hey... how's the law library world? It's gotta be tough with all those books being online now." (The implication being "aren't you worried about becoming irrelevant?") I reply with "Yeah, that makes it a whole lot more difficult to manage with all that information in a dozen different places than it did when it was a book in the library." I'm not sure who they think is managing the information which is usually behind a very expensive paywall. I would guess they either think that it is managed directly by the vendor, or worse, that the Information Technology department is now the de facto library managers.

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Tolkien's Plant Passion Moves Botanist To Create Guide To Middle Earth

NPR story - Tolkien's Plant Passion Moves Botanist To Create Guide To Middle Earth

When most people read J.R.R. Tolkien, they get swept up in mythical worlds of hobbits and elves, harrowing journeys in fantastical lands and epic battles of good and evil.

But Walter Judd says he got lost in the scenery.

"I started underlining every name of a plant as I was reading The Lord of the Rings," he tells NPR's Morning Edition.

All of the figures in the book — like this nasturtium — are hand-drawn by Graham Judd, who says he used a minimalist woodblock-style to let readers' imaginations bring the illustrations to life.

Moved by Tolkien's passion for plants, the retired botany professor spent years cataloging every plant that appeared in his writing, eventually compiling a list of 141 different species. He teamed up with his son, Graham, a professional illustrator. And together, they embarked on quest to transform that list into a botanical guide to Middle Earth.
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Danvers Mass Library No Chuck E Cheese Tokens Fine Payments

<blockquote>Someone, however, thought it was worth a try. Sue Kontos, the bookkeeper at the Peabody Institute Library of Danvers, wound up tallying three Chuck E. Cheese's tokens and one Bonkers token while counting coins the other day before she realized they weren't real currency. "Somehow, their coins turned up in the rest of the cash," Kontos said.

Clovis Library Shooting: Teen Planned To Shoot Up High School

The father of a troubled 16-year-old boy charged with gunning down two library workers in Clovis, New Mexico said he knew something was amiss when he noticed two handguns were were missing from his home safe.

He reported that information to police, along with the fact that his son — serving a suspension from his high school — was not at home. But by then, the deadly shooting had already happened.

Nathaniel Jouett initially planned to shoot up his high school but went instead to the Clovis-Carver Public Library in the rural community Monday afternoon, according to court documents filed Wednesday.

Full article -- Clovis Library Shooting: Teen Planned To Shoot Up High School
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Reproducing Racism



Reproducing Racism: How Everyday Choices Lock In White Advantage

This book is designed to change the way we think about racial inequality. Long after the passage of civil rights laws and now the inauguration of our first black president, blacks and Latinos possess barely a nickel of wealth for every dollar that whites have. Why have we made so little progress?

Legal scholar Daria Roithmayr provocatively argues that racial inequality lives on because white advantage functions as a powerful self-reinforcing monopoly, reproducing itself automatically from generation to generation even in the absence of intentional discrimination. Drawing on work in antitrust law and a range of other disciplines, Roithmayr brilliantly compares the dynamics of white advantage to the unfair tactics of giants like AT&T and Microsoft.

With penetrating insight, Roithmayr locates the engine of white monopoly in positive feedback loops that connect the dramatic disparity of Jim Crow to modern racial gaps in jobs, housing and education. Wealthy white neighborhoods fund public schools that then turn out wealthy white neighbors. Whites with lucrative jobs informally refer their friends, who refer their friends, and so on. Roithmayr concludes that racial inequality might now be locked in place, unless policymakers immediately take drastic steps to dismantle this oppressive system.
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Deadly Shooting at Clovis Library in New Mexico

KRQE reports on a shooting at the Clovis-Carver Public Library in Eastern New Mexico. Two are dead, four injured.

More on this developing story from USA Today.

The two individuals killed were library staffers. More from KOAT.

Movies are more than screen deep. Here’s how to watch like a critic

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Phoenix Central Library Closed Until June 2018

After suffering major damage during a monsoon storm, Burton Barr Library, the main library of the Phoenix Public Library will remain closed until June 2018. On July 15, 2017, high winds lifted the roof of the library causing the rupture of a fire-sprinkler pipe on the top floor. Torrents of water flooded the building before the system was shut off.

Earlier today, AZCentral released new information that city employees knew about the condition of the pipe for at least three years, but nothing was done to fix it.

Photos and more at AZCentral.

16 Books About Race That Every White Person Should Read

UW Librarian’s Book Reveals Business Icon’s Impact on Rural America

A University of Wyoming faculty member’s new book about James Cash Penney explores how the department store icon and his company shaped rural America throughout the 20th century.

“I wanted to wrap my mind around the scope of Penney’s extensive involvement in agriculture and rural America and, ultimately, understand why a successful department store icon would choose to pursue such activities while living and working in New York City,” says David Kruger, UW’s agricultural research librarian.

“J.C. Penney: The Man, the Store, and American Agriculture” provides a biographical account of the business mogul and a historical view of his company and rural America.

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What Books Are on the Librarian of Congress' Nightstand?

From the New YorkTimes Books , LOC's Dr. Carla Hayden finds she needs more space than just a nightstand to keep up with her reading.

"I do have books on my night stand, but I have recently had to add three bookcases in my room because it was getting too crowded. Those are organized in three categories — fun and mysteries, because I love mysteries; books that relate somehow to what I’m doing professionally, like “The Revenge of Analog” or “The Innovators”; and aspirational — those are mostly about health and exercise."

I was pleased to see the answer to this question, "The last book that made you furious?", as I really enjoyed the same book.

  • "That is a sign of a good book — when it makes you feel an emotion so deeply. I remember reading “The Language of Flowers” and at one point being so mad at the main character I had to remind myself, “Carla, this is fiction.” But when that happens, you know a story has you hooked. I have given that book to many people."
  • During Your MTA Commute...

    ...you can now read e-books courtesy of a new program called Subway Library, sponsored by the NY, Brooklyn and Queens libraries and enabled by wi-fi throughout the NYC subway transit system.

    A choice of pretty good selections too, many with NYC themes.

    Libraries Clear First Budget Hurdle in DC

    From Publishers Weekly:

    Last week, a House Appropriations subcommittee voted to recommend level funding for libraries in FY2018, which would mean roughly $231 million for the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), $183 million for the Library Services and Technology Act, and $27 million for the Innovative Approaches to Literacy (IAL) program.

    The vote comes after President Trump in May doubled down on his call to eliminate IMLS and virtually all federal funding for libraries, as well as a host of other vital agencies, including the National Endowments for the Arts and the Humanities.

    ALA president Jim Neal called the subcommittee vote “one important step in the lengthy congressional appropriations process,” but a development that nevertheless shows that “elected officials are listening to us and recognize libraries’ importance in the communities they represent.”

    San Jose library remodels to stop suicides

    About 11 a.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 1, a 36-year-old San Jose man shocked patrons and employees of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

    Phoenix's Burton Barr Cebral Library Damaged by Sprinklers

    From AZ Central an explanation and video of how the sprinkler system was set off by an atypical monsoon on Saturday.

    Phoenix Fire Capt. Reda Bigler said a pipe in the ceiling of the building's fifth floor ruptured when the storm lifted the roof and caused it to move in a wave-like fashion.

    “When (the roof) slammed back down it broke a sprinkler pipe," Bigler said. “That caused about 50 to 60 gallons a minute of water to start flowing through the building." All five stories were affected.

    Absense of Sound --a Librarian's Story

    From the July/August issue of the Saturday Evening Post a selection fron author N. West Moss's new story collection, focusing on a day in the life of a librarian at the Bryant Park NYPL .

    N. West Moss was the winner of the Post’s 2015 Great American Fiction Contest for “Omeer’s Mangoes,” which, with “Absence of Sound,” appears in her first short-story collection, The Subway Stops at Bryant Park (Leapfrog Press, 2017). This story first appeared in Neworld Review. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, Salon, McSweeney’s, and Brevity, among others.

    How to design a library that makes kids want to read

    There’s a Library in Vancouver Full of Hundreds of Books That Have Never Been Published, And Never Will Be

    These shelves exist because poet and novelist Richard Brautigan described a library of unpublished books in his 1971 novel, The Abortion: An Historical Romance. And 27 years ago in Vermont, a man named Todd Lockwood decided he would create the library for real. Lockwood fielded submissions from as far away as Saudia Arabia but in 1995, he ran out of money. The collection was orphaned until 2010, when John Barber, a Brautigan scholar, arranged to have the library brought to a new Vancouver home.
    From There’s a Library in Vancouver Full of Hundreds of Books That Have Never Been Published, And Never Will Be - Willamette Week
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