Los Angeles Wants to Filter Out Porn at City Libraries

"Librarians and patrons should not have to tolerate lewd behavior or drug use in public, but limiting what people access online is an anathema to free speech, and antithetical to the free flow of ideas," FSC executive director Eric Paul Leue said via email. "Filtering software sounds like an easy solution, but we know that such software often casts an egregiously wide net, blocking not only sexually explicit content, but also sexual health information, LGBTQ sites and sites like ours, which contains no sexual imagery whatsoever, but discusses issues relevant to the adult industry."
From Los Angeles Wants to Filter Out Porn at City Libraries | L.A. Weekly
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This Kentucky Printer Makes Books The Old Fashioned Way

For more than 40 years Gray Zeitz has been creating books one at a time in his two-story print shop near the town of Monterey. He works with the some of the state's finest writers, including Wendell Berry and Bobby Ann Mason, and his Larkspur Press turns out just a few editions a year. "I have had, and still do have, printers that come in that used to work on presses like this and they are just tickled to death," says Zeitz, 69, showing me his 1915 Chandler & Price printing press. He cuts stacks of paper on another machine that dates from the late 1800s.
From This Kentucky Printer Makes Books The Old Fashioned Way : NPR
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The man who shared his books and multiplied them

But a man in Manila was surprised when he shared his books. His reads didn’t only come back, but they also increased in numbers. Plus, he made new friends who shared the same interests and beliefs as him. He is now planning to take his book sharing idea to other cities. One of his new friends also plans to start a “book boat” and plans to travel to islands, sharing books. Woodpie too shares the same belief as him that stacking books on a rack or locking them in, is injustice to books. They should be set free. Books ought to be shared. They will not only bring in more books, but also more friends. We came across this inspiring story and couldn’t help but share it with you. The man who turned his home into a public library
From The man who shared his books and multiplied them | woodpie blog
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This Dog Sits on Seven Editorial Boards

Ollie’s owner, Mike Daube, is a professor of health policy at Australia’s Curtin University. He initially signed his dog up for the positions as a joke, with credentials such as an affiliation at the Subiaco College of Veterinary Science. But soon, he told Perth Now in a video, he realized it was a chance to show just how predatory some journals can be.
From This Dog Sits on Seven Editorial Boards - Atlas Obscura
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Twenty-six words we don’t want to lose

In September, academics in Britain uncovered 30 words ‘lost’ from the English language: researchers spent three months looking through old dictionaries to find them, in the hope they could bring the words back into modern conversations. For Jones, who blogs and tweets under the name Haggard Hawks, it has been a lifetime of word geekery. “I’ve been obsessed with language ever since I was a kid,” he tells BBC Culture. “I got a big illustrated kids’ dictionary when I was eight or nine – I got it for Christmas off my grandparents – I just sat and read it cover to cover, like you would a normal book. I was absolutely hooked.”
From BBC - Culture - Twenty-six words we don’t want to lose
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When Making Books Was As Much Of An Art As Writing Them

When was the last time you picked up a book and really looked at how it was made: the typeface, the feel of the paper, the way the words look on the page? Today, when people can read on their phones, some books never even make it to paper.

Once, bookmaking was an art as refined and distinct as the writing it presents. And in some places, like Larkspur Press in Kentucky, it still is.

Full story here.
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The populism of Amazon’s real-world bookstores

Walking around, I half-expected to see SQL queries accompanying some of the displays — “SELECT * FROM books WHERE rating > 4.8 AND pub_year = 2017 ORDER BY number_sold”. Amazon definitely needs to figure out how to get a little weird into their stores, a little of the human touch. Toning down the data talk would help. A more casual typeface might work too — not Comic Sans but perhaps something at least approaching handwritten? They’ve got so so much data about how people buy books…they just need to be more clever about how they slice and dice it. Maybe look for books that exhibit the Napoleon Dynamite Problem? Find people with interesting wishlists?
From The populism of Amazon’s real-world bookstores

Welcome to your local library, which also happens to be a newsroom

Her venue: San Antonio’s majestic Central Library. While several journalism outlets have partnered with local libraries on book fairs, educational programs or occasional talks, NOWCastSA’s studio and staff has been housed in two offices in the library since 2010. Lucas runs a cadre of a half-dozen or so college interns who film everything from mayoral debates to high school graduations, helping San Antonio learn about itself.
From Welcome to your local library, which also happens to be a newsroom | Poynter
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The Culture War Being Fought Over Tomorrow’s Libraries

Today libraries are simultaneously tourist destinations, places to read, places to gather and socialize, places to study, and places to learn. They also remain a mirror of our culture. They reflect not just the way we consume information (and architecture) through our phones today, but also the forces of that inequality. Tomorrow, will libraries exist as the gateway to public enrichment,  or will they all be reduced down to naming rights and Instagram hashtags?
From The Culture War Being Fought Over Tomorrow’s Libraries
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Seeking title of short story

Looking for the title and author of a short story I read. I recall reading this story in a Science fiction magazine like Analog or Asimov's. The story detailed a fast food restaurant that had an elaborate defense system to protect against robbers or mass shooters. The story either directly said or hinted that these types of attacks were so common that this restaurant defense system was nothing unusual. The story details an attack on the restaurant and the defense systems countering the attack. The story ends with the employee running the defense system dropping a micro-particle screen to protect the restaurant from gunfire. The attacker is hit by the screen and is killed. I believe I read the story around 20 years ago. I think story was written prior to Columbine. I am interested to look at the short story again and read it now that I am in a future world that has many similarities to the story. Problem is I cannot not remember title or author. Would appreciate if anyone has hints of what the story might be.

As I have asked around about this short story some people have suggested the book "Altered Carbon". That book has a scene where an automatic defense system operates in a hotel. I have read that book and I know why people are making the connection to my question but the item I am looking for is definitely a short story and not a novel.
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Best Books of the Year @ Amazon.com

More About Amazon.com's Best Books of 2017 All year, Amazon.com's editorial team reads with an eye for the Best Books of the Month, plus the best books in popular categories like Cooking, Food & Wine, Literature & Fiction, Children's books, Mystery & Thrillers, Comics & Graphic Novels, Romance, Science Fiction & Fantasy, the best books for teens, and more. We scour reviews and book news for tips on what the earliest readers have loved, share our own copies and tear through as many books as possible. Then we face off in a monthly Best Books meeting to champion the titles we think will resonate most with readers. In October, we collect all our favorites, look at upcoming 2017 titles, and cast our ballots for the Best Books of the Year. The titles that made our lists are the keepers, the ones we couldn't forget. Many of our editorial picks for the best books are also customer favorites and best sellers, but we love to spotlight the best books you might not otherwise have heard about, too. The books included in Amazon's Best Books program are entirely editorial selections. We are committed to helping customers find terrific gifts for booklovers and drawing more attention to exceptional authors. Our passion is for uniting readers of all ages and tastes with their next favorite reads.
From Best Books of the Year @ Amazon.com
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'We're told to be grateful we even have readers': pirated ebooks threaten the future of book series

Stiefvater revealed that she is now writing three more books set in the Raven Cycle world, but that the new trilogy “nearly didn’t exist because of piracy”. “And already I can see in the tags how Tumblr users are talking about how they intend to pirate book one of the new trilogy for any number of reasons, because I am terrible or because they would ‘rather die than pay for a book’,” she wrote. “As an author, I can’t stop that. But pirating book one means that publishing cancels book two. This ain’t 2004 anymore. A pirated copy isn’t ‘good advertising’ or ‘great word of mouth’ or ‘not really a lost sale’.”
From 'We're told to be grateful we even have readers': pirated ebooks threaten the future of book series | Books | The Guardian
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In the Archives: Poison Pages

Originally a byproduct of the European mining industry, arsenic offered mining companies a means of profiting from a waste product, and offered manufacturers a means of obtaining a cheap dye. Thousands of tons were annually imported to the United States. The substance produced lovely hues ranging from deep emerald to pale sea-green. Arsenic could also be mixed into other colors, giving them a soft, appealing pastel appearance. The first application of arsenic as a pigment was as a paint dye. The pale green shade caught on as a “refined” color. American manufacturers began using arsenic to color a range of consumer goods. Children’s toys were painted with arsenical paint. Arsenic-dyed paper was used in greeting cards, stationery, candy boxes, concert tickets, posters, food container labels, mailing labels, pamphlets, playing cards, book-bindings, and envelopes –envelopes the sender had to lick.
From The Ann Arbor Chronicle | In the Archives: Poison Pages
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Card catalogs and the secret history of modernity

Card catalogs feel very old but are shockingly new. Merchants stored letters and slips of paper on wire or thread in the Renaissance. (Our word “file” comes from filum, or wire.) But a whole technology, based on scientific principles, for storing, retrieving, and circulating an infinitely extensible batch of documents? That is some modern-ass shit. And it helped create the world we all live in.
From Card catalogs and the secret history of modernity
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Are You a Public Librarian?

An award might be in your future.

Here’s information from ALA/PLA if you wish to make a nomination.

Biloxi Junior High will again teach 'To Kill A Mockingbird' in class, after national outcry

Biloxi has sent a letter home to students. It plans to restore “To Kill A Mockingbird” to the eighth-grade classroom and begin teaching it again in class, starting Monday. Students do, however, have to ask to participate, by returning a permission slip signed by a parent to their school and their English Language Arts teacher by Friday.
From Biloxi Junior High will again teach 'To Kill A Mockingbird' in class, after national outcry | The Sun Herald
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Alameda County Library Patron Records Possibly Hacked

An email to library members says officials were contacted last month by someone claiming to have information from the library system’s entire database of users. That contact included the names and addresses of about three dozen library patrons.
From Alameda County Library Patron Records Possibly Hacked « CBS San Francisco
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Seattle Mystery Bookshop: Why the Seattle Mystery Bookshop Must Close

Why? There are so many reasons. Blame Amazon? Sure, that’s the easy thing to say but the massive changes in the world of bookselling are far larger than that. In fact, the changes in the over-all economy make it a much, much bigger story.
From Seattle Mystery Bookshop: Why the Seattle Mystery Bookshop Must Close
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On the pleasures of stumbling upon books in the wrong places

It’s funny to think I just stumbled on this book by chance. I must have been escaping from something much more heavy—I love the turgid pace of an academic book, if it’s a topic I really care about, about once a year. I think I probably escaped to Jean Stafford from something like that, and I didn’t expect much of her. I thought, Oh, this is just good old-fashioned fiction, I’ll try that for a change. So often you’re just reacting to the last book you read, and you want something that’s a little bit of an antidote to that. I’ve found that if I live a more programmatic life where I’m reading the books that I’m supposed to read—if I’m accomplishing all my little chores of reading what everybody else is reading—I stop having time to read in a way that’s rich and multiple.
From Happy Accidents
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BBC - Future - Why printers add secret tracking dots

“Zooming in on the document, they were pretty obvious,” says Ted Han at cataloguing platform Document Cloud, who was one of the first to notice them. “It is interesting and notable that this stuff is out there.”
From BBC - Future - Why printers add secret tracking dots
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