Hopepunk can’t fix our broken science fiction.

Yet I have come to suspect these punk derivatives signal something more than the usual merry-go-round of pop culture. These punks indicate that something is broken in our science fiction. Indeed, even when they reject it, these new subgenres often repeat the same gestures as cyberpunk, discover the same facts about the world, and tell the same story. Our hacker hero (or his magic-wielding counterpart) faces a huge system of power, overcomes long odds, and finally makes the world marginally better—but not so much better that the author can’t write a sequel. The 1980s have, in a sense, never ended; they seem as if they might never end.
From Hopepunk can’t fix our broken science fiction.
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The library of forbidden books

From 1976 until his death in 2013, Georg P Salzmann collected about 12,000 books that had been banned – and burnt – by the Nazis for being ‘un-German’. His father – a Nazi – had shot himself in 1945, when Georg was a teenager. What became known as the Library of Burnt Books was sold to the University of Augsburg in 2009 – and is now open to the public. Stumpf describes the first book that Salzmann bought, as well as how one author witnessed his own books being burnt.
From BBC - Culture - The library of forbidden books
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Elsevier journal editors resign, start rival open-access journal

The entire editorial board of the Elsevier-owned Journal of Informetrics resigned Thursday in protest over high open-access fees, restricted access to citation data and commercial control of scholarly work. Today, the same team is launching a new fully open-access journal called Quantitative Science Studies. The journal will be for and by the academic community and will be owned by the International Society for Scientometrics and Informetrics (ISSI). It will be published jointly with MIT Press.
From Elsevier journal editors resign, start rival open-access journal
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Book sales are up this year over last year, and physical books are thriving

It’s a tale as old as time, or, at least, the internet: None of us are reading any more, the physical book is dead, Amazon has killed the independent bookstore, and it’s all only going to get worse. But this year, the story looks like just that—a fiction. We are buying books—especially the kind with physical pages—and we’re doing so, increasingly, in well-loved indie bookstores.
From Book sales — Quartz
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Stephen King prevented a Maine newspaper from axing its freelance book reviewers

King was happy to oblige, smirkingly calling the Herald’s request “blackmail.” And, thanks to his following of more than five million, the Herald raked in roughly 200 new subscriptions in less than 48 hours. “It’s a Stephen King story with a happy ending,” Lisa DeSisto, chief executive of MaineToday Media, which publishes the Herald, told the New York Times.
From Stephen King prevented a Maine newspaper from axing its freelance book reviewers
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Eighteenth-century schoolboy's doodles uncovered as library is restored

A centuries-old doodle of a cyclops has been discovered in a study-shy teenager’s book of ancient Greek plays by conservation staff restoring his family’s library in a Hampshire mansion. William John Chute, who lived at The Vyne between 1757 and 1824, was the owner of the book and is believed to have drawn the sketch when he was 15. The National Trust has identified it as the cyclops Polephemus, from Homer’s Odyssey.
From Eighteenth-century schoolboy's doodles uncovered as library is restored | Books | The Guardian
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The Room of Requirement: Stories From Libraries - This American Life

Libraries aren't just for books. They're often spaces that transform into what you need them to be: a classroom, a cyber café, a place to find answers, a quiet spot to be alone. It's actually kind of magical. This week, we have stories of people who roam the stacks and find unexpected things that just happen to be exactly what they required. 
From The Room of Requirement - This American Life Thanks Michael Sauers!
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Will the world embrace Plan S, the radical proposal to mandate open access to science papers?

Robert-Jan Smits, the European Commission's OA envoy in Brussels, who is one of the architects of Plan S, says publishers have stalled by emphasizing the need for broad participation. "The big publishers told me: ‘Listen, we can only flip our journals [to OA] if this is signed by everyone. So first go on a trip around the world and come back in 20 years. Then we can talk again,’" Smits recalls. "Some people try to do anything to keep the status quo."
From Will the world embrace Plan S, the radical proposal to mandate open access to science papers? | Science | AAAS
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A Survey of the First 20 Years of Research on Semantic Web and Linked Data

ABSTRACT. This paper is a survey of the research topics in the field of Semantic Web, Linked Data and Web of Data. This study looks at the contributions of this research community over its first twenty years of existence. Compiling several bibliographical sources and bibliometric indicators, we identify the main research trends and we reference some of their major publications to provide an overview of that initial period. We conclude with some perspectives for the future research challenges.
From A Survey of the First 20 Years of Research on Semantic Web and Linked Data
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Interview: NYPL’s chief digital officer says public is better off when libraries are ‘risk averse’ about tech – GeekWire

“Librarians are incredibly risk averse,” he said. “I think they do care very much about patrons and about the impact that their work does, and so we’re very unlikely to take a chance when we’re dealing with public money and when we’re dealing with patrons; we have a personal relationship with them.”
From Interview: NYPL’s chief digital officer says public is better off when libraries are ‘risk averse’ about tech – GeekWire
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The 'Future Book' Is Here, but It's Not What We Expected | WIRED

Physical books today look like physical books of last century. And digital books of today look, feel, and function almost identically to digital books of 10 years ago, when the Kindle launched. The biggest change is that many of Amazon’s competitors have gone belly up or shrunken to irrelevancy. The digital reading and digital book startup ecosystem that briefly emerged in the early 2010s has shriveled to a nubbin.
From The 'Future Book' Is Here, but It's Not What We Expected | WIRED
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The Library Book: Susan Orlean in Conversation with David Ulin

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For the First Time in More Than 20 Years, Copyrighted Works Will Enter the Public Domain

At midnight on New Year’s Eve, all works first published in the United States in 1923 will enter the public domain. It has been 21 years since the last mass expiration of copyright in the U.S. That deluge of works includes not just “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening,” which appeared first in the New Republic in 1923, but hundreds of thousands of books, musical compositions, paintings, poems, photographs and films. After January 1, any record label can issue a dubstep version of the 1923 hit “Yes! We Have No Bananas,” any middle school can produce Theodore Pratt’s stage adaptation of The Picture of Dorian Gray, and any historian can publish Winston Churchill’s The World Crisis with her own extensive annotations. Any artist can create and sell a feminist response to Marcel Duchamp’s seminal Dadaist piece, The Large Glass (The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even) and any filmmaker can remake Cecil B. DeMille’s original The Ten Commandments and post it on YouTube.
From For the First Time in More Than 20 Years, Copyrighted Works Will Enter the Public Domain | Arts & Culture | Smithsonian
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Alleged killer of Natomas librarian had history of threats toward librarians

Ronald Seay, the man accused in the deadly ambush shooting of a Natomas librarian last week, had been arrested multiple times for causing disturbances in libraries in the St. Louis area before moving to Sacramento this fall, Missouri officials told The Sacramento Bee.

Full article here.

Ten Stories That Shaped 2018

As we limp our way into 2019, let's take a look back at some of the notable library stories from the past year.

10. The Opioid Epidemic Continues

The abuse of narcotics has become so widespread in this country that our average life expectancy has declined as a result. The use of Narcan to treat overdoses occurring in libraries is one way we can contribute to public health.

9. More Fake News

Although political propaganda is nothing new, the growing threat of what has been dubbed "information terrorism," aided by technological advances in the creation of bogus pieces of reporting, make our role as archivists and educators all the more important.

8. Search Engines are Bigots

Keep Copyright Office in Library of Congress

Urgent! Contact Your Senator About S. 1010 If passed, Congress would voluntarily hand over the power to appoint the copyright advisor to the president. The Register of Copyrights Selection and Accountability Act (S. 1010), a Senate companion to House bill (H.R. 1695), will be voted on by the Senate Rules and Administration Committee this Tuesday, in spite of previous concerns by committee members. This legislation would make the position of the Register of Copyrights subject to Presidential appointment and Senate confirmation. Under current law, the Librarian of Congress selects the Register. ALA strongly opposes this bill and needs you to contact your U.S. Senators to express your objections to this bill and ask them to vote against it.
From Send a Message Thanks Thanks Robin!
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Forget Book Trailers: Book Playlists are the New Hotness

Book trailers are already such a thing that there’s whole weekly columns devoted to them, a whole slew of tips and tricks; a veritable ecosystem. People want multimedia with their books. But what if the new hotness wasn’t a trailer at all? What if it was something that lots of us already do anyways, with a much lower barrier for entry? I’m talking about book playlists, music that reflects the theme or the time and place of the book, a non-audiobook soundtrack that enhances and embellishes the written word.
From Forget Book Trailers: Book Playlists are the New Hotness
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Oxford’s Library Once Branded Its Sauciest Books With a Greek Letter

FOR MORE THAN A HUNDRED years, deep in a dusty enclave of the University of Oxford’s Bodleian Libraries, there sat a restricted collection—2,100 books deemed too subversive, too toxic, too scandalous for eager minds. These books, principally concerned with sex, made up the “Phi” collection, bearing the Greek “Φ” on their spines like a mark of sin. But things are different now, and these books are proudly on display at the Bodleian, in the Story of Phi: Restricted Books exhibit that opened on November 15, 2018.
From Oxford’s Library Once Branded Its Sauciest Books With a Greek Letter - Atlas Obscura
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Bookstore's Tweet On The Sale Of A Children's Book After 27 Years, Goes Viral : NPR

The store's tweet about the sale has since gone viral and received thousands of replies. Author Sarah Todd Taylor tweeted in response, "The book held its breath. It had hoped so often, only to have that hope crushed. Hands lifted it from the shelf, wrapped it warmly in paper. As the door closed on its past life, the book heard the soft cheers of its shelfmates."
From Bookstore's Tweet On The Sale Of A Children's Book After 27 Years, Goes Viral : NPR
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The Competitive Book Sorters Who Spread Knowledge Around New York - Atlas Obscura

With minutes to go until game time, the 12 elite sorters have emerged, wearing matching BookOps T-shirts. They march toward the machine as if boarding Apollo 11. The offices upstairs have emptied into the basement, and a wide variety of library personnel fill every available space in the room to cheer the sorters on. “We’re gonna take ‘em down, it’s not gonna be an issue,” says Michael Genao, a 22-year-old sophomore sorter with a linebacker’s build. “I guarantee it,” he adds, as he paces between his teammates, the last few bites of a chocolate donut in his hand.
From The Competitive Book Sorters Who Spread Knowledge Around New York - Atlas Obscura
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