Bill To Bring Libraries To NYC Jails Faces Opposition From The Correction Department

On Tuesday, the City Council’s Criminal Justice Committee heard testimony on Councilmember Daniel Dromm’s bill, Int. 1184, that requires the Department of Correction to provide access to the library for all incarcerated people within 48 hours of entering the jail system. The Department would be required to report on the number of books they receive, the source of those books and, if books are censored, the reason for the censorship.
From Bill To Bring Libraries To NYC Jails Faces Opposition From The Correction Department: Gothamist

School Districts No Longer Required To Have Nurses, Librarians Under Senate Bill In Iowa

School districts would no longer be required to have a school nurse and a teacher librarian under a proposal advanced in the Iowa Senate Tuesday. Sen. Amy Sinclair, R-Allerton, chair of the Education Committee, said the bill would give school boards and communities more power to make decisions that are best for local students. “Do we trust those people and their teachers to make the decisions that are appropriate to their students, or not? It’s as simple as that,” Sinclair said.
From School Districts No Longer Required To Have Nurses, Librarians Under Senate Bill | Iowa Public Radio

Publishers say that the bold open-access initiative rules out proven ways of opening up the literature

Highly selective journals, in particular, argued that they have high internal costs that couldn’t reasonably be recouped in a fully open-access model, and that cutting costs would risk reducing journals’ quality. Some publishing companies also urged the initiative to reconsider its policy on hybrid journals. But their arguments have been rebuffed by Robert-Jan Smits, the European Commission’s open-access envoy and architect of Plan S, to which 18 research funders have so far signed up.
From High-profile subscription journals critique Plan S

Libraries, museums, and universities must include hip-hop culture in their programming in thoughtful, authentic ways

Many of these institutions have begun to embrace this marriage of ideas. Hip-hop curricula, archives, conferences, and fellowships now have homes in even the nation’s most venerable academic institutions, including Cornell University, Harvard University, Duke University, and many more. Libraries across the country, from small towns to the New York Public Library, have welcomed hip-hop programming, as have storied institutions such as Carnegie Hall and The Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.
From Legacy Institutions Must Welcome Hip-Hop Into Their Halls
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Dr. Seuss Books Can Be Racist, But We Still Keep Reading Them : Code Switch : NPR

That tension between Seuss and Seuss-free classrooms is emblematic of a bigger debate playing out across the country — should we continue to teach classic books that may be problematic, or eschew them in favor of works that more positively represent of people of color?
From Dr. Seuss Books Can Be Racist, But We Still Keep Reading Them : Code Switch : NPR
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School librarians left out of $5K pay raise proposal in TX

School librarians, who are required to teach in a classroom for two years and in many cases receive a master’s degree to qualify for the position, would be excluded from legislation offering a $5,000 pay raise to all Texas teachers. Senate Bill 3 would allocate $3.7 billion over two years to boost pay for classroom teachers but not other education employees such as bus drivers, counselors or librarians. The legislation, touted as a way to better retain teachers and recognize them for the importance of their jobs, is a priority for Senate GOP leaders, amid a renewed focus among lawmakers in both chambers and both parties on improving public education in Texas.
From School librarians left out of $5K pay raise proposal

Librarians pore over books to keep out the bedbugs

Lincoln library officials say librarians have been inspecting each item checked back into the eight branches, committed to keeping out any bedbugs. The library system discovered bedbugs in some books in 2014, amid a national rash of bedbug reports from a variety of places, including theaters and thrift stores, college dorms and apartment buildings, hotel rooms and surgical centers.
From Librarians pore over books to keep out the bedbugs | KHGI
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Oklahoma teacher, book collector makes hobby of reuniting families with meaningful bookmarks

Smreker is a French teacher at Harding Charter Prep and in her free time she loves to collect used books. But, she says sometimes it's not just the tale they are intended to tell that make them interesting.
From Oklahoma teacher, book collector makes hobby of reuniting families with meaningful bookmarks | KFOR.com
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How to Read 80ish Books a Year (And Actually Remember Them)

Reading is a skill that once you’ve learned, you probably don’t spend much time trying to get better at. (Not all that different from, say, breathing.) And yet, many of us don’t have to look far to see signs that there’s plenty of room for improvement. We only read at the end of the day—and only for the three minutes between cracking open a book and falling asleep. We’re halfway through about nine books. And our bookshelves are littered with titles that we remember reading but don’t exactly remember anything about.
From How to Read 80ish Books a Year (And Actually Remember Them) | GQ
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The Obama Presidential Library That Isn’t

But the center, which will cost an estimated $500 million, will also differ from the complexes built by Barack Obama’s predecessors in another way: It won’t actually be a presidential library. In a break with precedent, there will be no research library on site, and none of Mr. Obama’s official presidential records. Instead, the Obama Foundation will pay to digitize the roughly 30 million pages of unclassified paper records from the administration so they can be made available online.
From The Obama Presidential Library That Isn’t - The New York Times

'I can't even look at the cover': the most disturbing books

From hiding from a copy of The Exorcist to being unnerved by the likes of Shirley Jackson, Stephen King and Iain Banks, here are The Guardian Reader's most alarming reading experiences
From 'I can't even look at the cover': the most disturbing books | Books | The Guardian
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How Do You Preserve History On The Moon? : NPR

Historic preservationists are hoping that the upcoming 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing this summer will persuade the United Nations to do something to protect Neil Armstrong's footprints in the lunar dust. Some of his boot marks are still up there, after all, along with other precious artifacts from humanity's first steps on another world. Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin left behind tools and science equipment, a plaque that read, "We came in peace for all mankind," and the U.S. flag, which has likely been bleached white by five decades of harsh ultraviolet light.
From How Do You Preserve History On The Moon? : NPR
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Wayne State to roll out fast-track librarian certificate amid shortage, student demand

Wayne State University is set to offer a new experimental school library certificate to address student demand and a general shortage of certified school librarians in the state. The Detroit-based university plans to offer a 15-credit program through its School of Information Sciences, said Matt Fredericks, academic services officer for the school. The course load is designed to equip students with the necessary media specialist skills without requiring the typical 36-credit master's program.
From Wayne State to roll out fast-track librarian certificate amid shortage, student demand
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Around 2,000 Artifacts Have Been Saved From the Ruins of Brazil’s National Museum Fire

As an array of recovery efforts launched over the past five months attest, the beloved Rio de Janeiro institution’s story is far from finished: Just two weeks after the fire, museum staffers gathered in the front of the burned building to host a temporary exhibition of surviving artifacts, and at the end of the year, Google Arts & Culture immortalized the pre-fire building in a comprehensive virtual tour. The museum even opened an exhibition in mid-January, titled When Not Everything Was Ice: New Discoveries in the Antarctic Continent, at the Museum of the Brazilian Mint, which served as the national institution’s home back in the 19th century.
From Around 2,000 Artifacts Have Been Saved From the Ruins of Brazil’s National Museum Fire | Smart News | Smithsonian
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How American Cities Got Their Libraries - CityLab

A visual exploration of how a critical piece of social infrastructure came to be. This month, CityLab’s visual storyteller Ariel Aberg-Riger shares the story of how America’s public libraries came to be, and their uneven history of serving all who need them.
From How American Cities Got Their Libraries - CityLab
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The Lab Discovering DNA in Old Books - The Atlantic

In recent years, archaeologists and historians have awakened to the potential of ancient DNA extracted from human bones and teeth. DNA evidence has enriched—and complicated—stories of prehistoric human migrations. It has provided tantalizing clues to epidemics such as the black death. It has identified the remains of King Richard III, found under a parking lot. But Collins isn’t just interested in human remains. He’s interested in the things these humans made; the animals they bred, slaughtered, and ate; and the economies they created.
From The Lab Discovering DNA in Old Books - The Atlantic
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Librarians and Their Memorable Patron Interactions

some reference and book questions stick out more than others. They stand out either because they were truly great questions or because they were absolutely ridiculous. Either way, patrons never fail to keep me on my toes. Just when I think a decade of public libraries has allowed me to see and hear it all, another question or situation leaves me stunned. Here are some of my most memorable patron interactions:
From Librarians and Their Memorable Patron Interactions | Book Riot
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Female Librarians on Horseback Delivering Books, ca. 1930s

President Franklin Roosevelt was trying to figure out a way to resolve the Great Depression of the 1930s. His Works Progress Administration created the Pack Horse Library Initiative to help Americans become more literate so that they’d have a better chance of finding employment.
From Female Librarians on Horseback Delivering Books, ca. 1930s | History Daily
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Some of the Rarest Books in the World Can Be Found in This Downtown Library In Texas

BEHIND A LARGE CAUTION SIGN on a locked door inside the Houston Metropolitan Research Center at Houston Public Library’s Julia Ideson Building downtown, you’ll find the vault. It’s not filled with money or an arsenal, but it does contain the world’s most valuable currency and deadliest weapon—the written word. Researchers must apply to peruse the rare, often centuries-old books and other artifacts inside the room, which is kept at a crisp 60 degrees and cared for by preservation librarian Elizabeth Mayer. We asked her to share some of her favorite rarities with Houstonia readers, and she obliged.
From Some of the Rarest Books in the World Can Be Found in This Downtown Library | Houstonia
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Menu Matters: On Alison Pearlman’s “May We Suggest” - Los Angeles Review of Books

Studies of menus, however, are a little trickier to find. Menus as scholarly artifacts have come a long way in recent years — traveling from the libraries of antiquarians and sentimental dilettantes to invocations in academic monographs about everything from environmental history to immigration patterns to changing trends in graphic design. The New York Public Library’s collection of over 45,000 menus is getting a lot more traffic than it used to, while To Live and Dine in L.A. (2015) — a collaborative project sponsored by the Library Foundation of Los Angeles that resulted in an exhibition and a book — celebrated the menu collection of the Los Angeles Public Library.
From Menu Matters: On Alison Pearlman’s “May We Suggest” - Los Angeles Review of Books
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