Information Architecture

Information Architecture

Wi-Fi-enabled school buses leave no child offline

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Fri, 01/22/2016 - 18:52
The digital divide and lack of reliable Internet access at home can put low-income and rural students at a real disadvantage. So when superintendent Darryl Adams took over one of the poorest school district in the nation, he made it a top priority to help his students get online 24/7. Special correspondent David Nazar of PBS SoCal reports with PBS NewsHour Student Reporting Labs.

Big Data Companies Agree: Farmers Should Own Their Information

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Mon, 11/17/2014 - 10:27

Some of the biggest names in American agriculture, ranging from farmers' organizations to private companies like Monsanto and DuPont, have agreed on principles governing the use of data collected from farms.

That data increasingly drives farm operations. Tractors and combines carry sensors that record — and upload to the data "cloud" — what happens on each spot of a farmer's field, from how much fertilizer and seed it received to how much grain it produced to what type of soil is found there. That data, once analyzed, guides decisions about what seeds a farmer will plant.

The Decline of Wikipedia

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Wed, 11/06/2013 - 15:55

Wikipedia and its stated ambition to “compile the sum of all human knowledge” are in trouble. The volunteer workforce that built the project’s flagship, the English-language Wikipedia—and must defend it against vandalism, hoaxes, and manipulation—has shrunk by more than a third since 2007 and is still shrinking. Those participants left seem incapable of fixing the flaws that keep Wikipedia from becoming a high-quality encyclopedia by any standard, including the project’s own.

Librarians and the communication revolution

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Tue, 06/25/2013 - 09:51

In the book Communication Revolution: Critical Junctures and the Future of Media author McChesney explains why we are in the midst of a communication revolution that is at the center of twenty-first-century life. Yet this profound juncture is not well understood, in part, because our media criticism and media scholarship have not been up to the task. Why is media not at the center of political debate?

Calling It 'Metadata' Doesn't Make Surveillance Less Intrusive

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Tue, 06/25/2013 - 09:38

Whether it's logs of phone calls or GPS data, commentator Geoff Nunberg says it still says a lot about who you are: "Tell me where you've been and who you've been talking to, and I'll tell you about your politics, your health, your sexual orientation, your finances," he says.

Full piece

Does Google Have an Ethical Obligation Not to Spy?

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Sat, 06/08/2013 - 11:00

Many Americans are outraged at the government for mining user data from Apple, Google, Facebook and other Silicon Valley giants. What about the actions of the companies themselves -- have they met their ethical obligations to their customers and society as a whole? Do they even have any?

Full article