Books

Books

Book clinic: why do publishers still issue hardbacks?

Submitted by Blake on Mon, 02/26/2018 - 19:19
Topic
However, there are no signs that the practice is coming to an end: last year sales of hardback fiction grew 11%. When the ebook arrived 10 years ago, some pundits suggested format did not matter. But they were wrong. A beautiful hardback is a joy, something to cherish, shelve and pass on, and readers are prepared to pay for that just as some people still prefer the cinema over television.
From Book clinic: why do publishers still issue hardbacks?

This Kentucky Printer Makes Books The Old Fashioned Way

Submitted by Blake on Mon, 11/27/2017 - 08:59
Topic
For more than 40 years Gray Zeitz has been creating books one at a time in his two-story print shop near the town of Monterey. He works with the some of the state's finest writers, including Wendell Berry and Bobby Ann Mason, and his Larkspur Press turns out just a few editions a year. "I have had, and still do have, printers that come in that used to work on presses like this and they are just tickled to death," says Zeitz, 69, showing me his 1915 Chandler & Price printing press.

When Making Books Was As Much Of An Art As Writing Them

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Fri, 11/24/2017 - 11:17
Topic
When was the last time you picked up a book and really looked at how it was made: the typeface, the feel of the paper, the way the words look on the page? Today, when people can read on their phones, some books never even make it to paper.

Once, bookmaking was an art as refined and distinct as the writing it presents. And in some places, like Larkspur Press in Kentucky, it still is.

Full story here.

On the pleasures of stumbling upon books in the wrong places

Submitted by Blake on Wed, 10/18/2017 - 09:08
Topic
It’s funny to think I just stumbled on this book by chance. I must have been escaping from something much more heavy—I love the turgid pace of an academic book, if it’s a topic I really care about, about once a year. I think I probably escaped to Jean Stafford from something like that, and I didn’t expect much of her. I thought, Oh, this is just good old-fashioned fiction, I’ll try that for a change. So often you’re just reacting to the last book you read, and you want something that’s a little bit of an antidote to that.