When Your Data Wanders to Places You’ve Never Been

A FEW weeks ago, a friend received a flier in the mail inviting her to an event in Manhattan for patients with multiple sclerosis.

“What’s in it for you?” said the flier from MS LifeLines, a support network for patients and their families that is financed by two drug makers, Pfizer and EMD Serono. “Strategies for managing and understanding your symptoms. Information about available treatments for relapsing M.S.”

The thing is that my friend, who requested that I keep her name out of this column, does not have multiple sclerosis, an autoimmune disease that affects the central nervous system.

But last year, she did search online for information about various diseases, including M.S., on a number of consumer health sites. She also subscribed to an online recommendation engine where she looked up consumer reviews of local physicians.

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Well to start with

Don't be logged into Google when doing searches as that's a primary way of connecting an exact person to searches.
Not saying there's not many other ways but that's pretty such the easiest way of such data being able to be tied to you.

IP

Pretty sure Google also tracks your IP

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