"Traffic" book aims to demystify driving woes

Author Tom Vanderbilt used to drive politely, merging as soon as he saw signs that his lane was ending, until one day on a New Jersey highway when he sped past the suckers in the slow lane.

Author Tom Vanderbilt used to drive politely, merging as soon as he saw signs that his lane was ending, until one day on a New Jersey highway when he sped past the suckers in the slow lane.

Ignoring the glares of drivers, he cut ahead of other cars just as his lane ended, realized his aggressive move saved him time, and began thinking about writing a new book.

"I became a 'late merger,"' Vanderbilt said, recalling his conversion experience. "My wife was upset at what I had done. I was so haunted by this weird experience."

So Vanderbilt did some research and both discovered the benefits of late merging and came up with the idea for his latest book "Traffic: Why We Drive the Way We Do (and What it Says About Us)."

Full article here.
In the New York Times Magazine there is also an article that discusses the traffic book. The NYT article does not just focus on the book and is a longer article. It even includes some multimedia. It is titled The Urge to Merge

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