Social Networking

On Facebook, Librarian Brings Two Students from the Early 1900s To Life

Facebook user “joe1915” writes wall posts that would be familiar to any college student these days: He stresses about tests, roots for his university’s football team, and shows off photos from campus dances.

But Joe McDonald isn’t an average smartphone-toting student. He died in 1971 — 33 years before Facebook arrived on the Web.

Donnelyn Curtis, the director of research collections and services at the University of Nevada at Reno, created Facebook profiles for Mr. McDonald and his wife, Leola Lewis, to give students a glimpse of university life during the couple’s college days. Ms. Lewis graduated in 1913, and Mr. McDonald earned his degree in mechanical engineering two years later.

With approval from Mr. McDonald’s granddaughter, Peggy McDonald, Ms. Curtis said she’s using archival material for a history project designed to appeal to a wider audience than the typical patrons of special collections.

“We’re just trying to help history come alive a little bit for students,” she said. At first, only extended family members bothered to “friend” with the pair’s profiles, but as the audience grew, Ms. Curtis said she had to find a humorous voice that would appeal to contemporary students who use Facebook every day.

From The Chronicle of Higher Education.

CIA’s ‘vengeful librarians’ stalk Twitter and Facebook

At the agency's Open Source Centre, a team known affectionately as the "vengeful librarians" also pores over newspapers, TV news channels, local radio stations, Internet chat rooms - anything overseas that anyone can access and contribute to openly.

An interesting quote: "The most successful analysts, Naquin said, are something like the heroine of the crime novel "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo," a quirky, irreverent computer hacker who "knows how to find stuff other people don't know exists." Those with a masters' degree in library science and multiple languages, especially those who grew up speaking another language, "make a powerful open source officer," Naquin said.

For more:
CIA’s ‘vengeful librarians’ stalk Twitter and Facebook
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/twitter/8869352/CIAs-vengeful-librarians-stalk-Twitter...

Do Salt Lake City Librarians Have a Censorship Problem?

Salt Lake City Library employees say the latest chapter on staff turmoil is rich with irony: a clampdown on free speech inside the very institution that celebrates the principle.

A just-launched crackdown on any opinionated email — and on criticism of management expressed via social media — has some veteran librarians fearing for their jobs and a chorus of others crying censorship.

Even Friends of the Library members are openly questioning the library’s direction and its “chronic problems.”

The uproar started last week after the human resources manager unveiled new guidelines for all-staff email. It is only appropriate, Shelly Chapman wrote, to send pertinent, work-related information such as available shifts and job announcements. “It was also determined,” Chapman wrote, “that employees would not use all-staff email to voice opinions or express concerns.”

“Appropriate” all-staff email must be reviewed by two staffers before sending, the edict reads. And “any other” all-staff email must be approved by the employee’s manager.

That prompted veteran librarian Ranae Pierce — via an all-staff email — to point out the irony of the rule, given the library’s free-speech mission. Story from the Salt Lake City Tribune.

Facebook Privacy Movie

so I just read the Lifehacker story, "Facebook Is Tracking Your Every Move on the Web; Here’s How to Stop It" and came up with this video. Please laugh.

Facebook Privacy Movie by: tom

Library Consultants and Social Networking

I originally posted this on my blog Bill the Librarian and on Google Plus as well as Facebook and Twitter.

In an effort to build up my own consulting, I have been contacting companies and individuals that do library consulting. I have heard from many people in this effort. I am trying to find those that participate in and also consult with libraries in the use of social networking and social media. I am finding it much more difficult than I thought it would be to locate library consultants practicing the use of social networks themselves and promoting their use in libraries. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to reach out to that group, if it exists?

Anyone Want to Check Out Google+? Sorry...

...sorry, you'll need an invite.

It's the tech world's version of the velvet rope. Companies such as Google hope that by limiting the number of people who can join their services -- like Google+, which is seen as Google's answer to Facebook -- they will be able drive up the buzz for those new sites.

A theory of human behavior is at work here: People want what they can't have. It's hard not to at least be curious what the new Google social network is like when every tech blogger on the Internet is writing about it.

There's ostensibly a technical component, too. If not everyone can join at once, there's less chance the site will crash.

But there's a quiet backlash brewing against this cool-kids method to website launches. Not only do people feel left out, but this exclusivity-builds-interest model also has a track record that's far from perfect.

More from CNN Tech.

Libraries Using Twitter

Discussion on the question: how do you approach the thorny issue of replies on twitter? From the Wikiman, aka Ned Potter, Librarian at the University of York (UK).

Banning Social Media in Libraries

Piece at EarlyWord about a social media discussion group they have created and how some librarians cannot participate because their employer does not allow social media.

Full piece

Engaged Readers

Engaged Readers, the first online reading program for public libraries with fully-integrated social networking features, is the latest offering from EngagedPatrons.org. Readers can create profiles, build and share booklists, write reviews, and get reading suggestions from library staff as well as fellow readers.

EngagedPatrons.org has been providing web services to public libraries since 2006. Services are free for small- and medium-sized libraries (about 85% of U.S. public libraries).

http://engagedpatrons.org/read

Social Media Lure Academics Frustrated by Journals

By Jennifer Howard in the Chronicle of Higher Education

Social media have become serious academic tools for many scholars, who use them for collaborative writing, conferencing, sharing images, and other research-related activities. So says a study just posted online called "Social Media and Research Workflow." Among its findings: Social scientists are now more likely to use social-media tools in their research than are their counterparts in the biological sciences. And researchers prefer popular applications like Twitter to those made for academic users.....More here.

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