People N Patrons

Odiferous Ejected Patron Sues Utah Library

After being asked to leave a Sugar House library because of his lack of hygiene, a Utah man is suing the Salt Lake City Library for $25,000 and he wants his library card re-activated. According to a lawsuit filed in 3rd District Court Wednesday, the man wrote that over the summer, he was banned from the public library at 2131 S. 1100 East by a librarian "who said that I smelled and I was unclean."

The man wrote that the librarian was talking loudly with another man, and the duo then began "badgering" him while he was using a library computer. The man argued in court papers that the librarian and her friend "made up erroneous lies about [the plaintiff’s] conduct and behavior while in the library."

The man wrote that he is suing on grounds of mental cruelty, defamation of character and lost wages — though, in another document asking to waive fees associated with filing the case, he wrote that he was unemployed.

According to the library’s rules of conduct, patrons who have offensive body odor or personal hygiene that interferes with other patrons’ ability to use the library will be asked to leave library grounds until the problem is corrected. No court date has been set in the case.

The man also filed a similar lawsuit against the City Creek Mall in July in federal court, asking for $100,000 in damages after he was kicked off the property for what he said were "ridiculous reasons," such as sitting on planter boxes and picking up cigarettes out of an ashtray. That case has been dismissed, according to court records.

When Difficult Patrons happen to Good Librarians

Story via librarian Roz Warren.

Even though librarians like Warren have to deal with these characters, they also have to also maintain their cool. She suggests that she might write a book with survival tips someday, and she already has title ideas:

Because we librarians are helpful and courteous by nature, we refrain from telling these folks off. Or telling them to get the hell out of our library. Instead, we smile and do what we can to help them. Which, given what we’re dealing with, calls for its own special guide book. “When Difficult Patrons Happen to Good Librarians.” Or “Impossible People For Dummies.” Some day I might just write that book.

The Most Loyal Patron

From The Telegraph, UK:

Louise Brown, 91 (NOT the first IVF baby), has read up to a dozen books a week since 1946 without incurring a single fine for late returns.

She borrows mainly large print books because she is partially sighted, and has almost worked her way through her local library's entire stock.

Library staff in Stranraer, Dumfries and Galloway, say the pensioner's rapacious reading habits over 60 years could earn her a place in the record books. Mrs Brown, a widow, said: "My parents were great readers and I've always loved books. I started reading when I was five and have never stopped. I like anything I can get my hands on." She said her favourite genres are family sagas, historical novels and war stories, but added: "I also like Mills and Boon for light reading at night." She said she had read too many books to have a favourite or top five, but if she had to choose a preferred genre it would be family sagas or historical novels.

Louise Pride, her daughter, said: "She has aids to help her sight and usually borrows large print books. But the trouble is she has read nearly all of them in the local library. She still finds time to ready a newspaper every day and to watch TV."

A Sly Cutter in Oak Grove

Someone is cutting random pages out of books at the Oak Lodge Library in Oak Grove, OR.

Clackamas County deputies say the vandal has targeted 122 books so far, costing taxpayers more than $2,700.
Over the past few weeks, library employees noticed pages had been torn and/or cut out of numerous books, mainly from the mystery and science fiction collections, deputies said.

Library employees conducted an internal investigation by viewing who had been checking out the vandalized books. They believe the damage was done while the books were still in the library, deputies said. Only the center pages are being ripped or torn out.

The mystery and science fiction books are in an area that is far away from the main desk and more difficult to monitor by staff.

Anyone with information concerning this crime is encouraged to contact the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office's confidential tip line by telephone at 503-723-4949.

Books on Bikes Attract Seattle Millenials

From NPR, a new program to deliver books to Seattlites via bike.

By the loading dock of Seattle's downtown library, librarian Jared Mills checks his tire pressure, secures his iPads and locks down about 100 books to an aluminum trailer the size of a steamer trunk. The scene is reminiscent of something you'd see in an action movie, when the hero is gearing up for a big fight, but Mills is gearing up for something very different.

"If you're not prepared and don't have a lot of experience hauling a trailer, it can be kind of dangerous," Mills says, especially when you're going downhill. "The trailer can hold up to 500 pounds."

Mills is part of Seattle Public Library's Books on Bikes program, which aims to keep the library nimble and relevant by sending librarians and their bicycles to popular community events around Seattle.

After a hilly, 5-mile bike ride to a local farmers market, Mills sets up shop among the fruit and vegetable booths. The bright orange trailer is custom-made with bookshelves and an umbrella holder (it is Seattle, after all).

Malena Harrang, in her early 20s, is visiting the market with a friend. She says Mills' book station is "like [a] carbon-neutral library on wheels — doesn't get better than that."

The Hungry Bibliophile Bear

West Hartford Library (West Hartford, CT) patron Bob Snook was on vacation in New Hampshire during the 4th of July when a curious bear took an interest in his library book (Red Country by Joe Abercrombie, for those who are curious). To quote Francis Bacon, “Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested.” Needless to say, this was the best story we have heard regarding the need to pay a replacement cost on an item. The West Hartford Library was voted best library in the region by Hartford Magazine for 2013, and consists of three library branches, serving a population of over 60,000. (Pictured: Bob Snook and the Hungry Bibliophile Bear. Photo credit: Bob and Alyssa Snook.)

Immigration Bill Gets a Library Add-On

Sen. Jack Reed (D-RI) is offering a library amendment to the immigration bill that the Senate is considering this week. The amendment, #1223, would make public libraries eligible for funding for English language instruction and civics education, and would also add Susan Hildreth, the director of the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to the Task Force on New Americans. The American Library Association (ALA) is asking its members to call their Senators in support of Reed’s amendment.

According to the Congressional Record, Reed said that the amendment “recognizes the longstanding role that libraries have played in helping new Americans learn English, American

civics, and integrate into our local communities. It ensures that they continue to have a voice in these critical efforts… This amendment expands on the recent partnership between U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) and IMLS.” He also cited IMLS statistics which say that more than 55 percent of new Americans use a public library at least once a week.

Story from Library Journal.

Rolling Stones legend has finally been brought to book – for unpaid library fines dating back 50 YEARS

Current darling of the literary world, Keith Richards, is in trouble with his childhood library.

It's hardly the most rock and roll rap he’s ever faced. But after a lifetime of hell-raising Keith Richards has finally been brought to book – for unpaid library fines dating back 50 YEARS.

The Rolling Stones legend, 69, admits he still owes for books he borrowed and failed to return to his local public library in Dartford, Kent, when he was a teenager.

And at 15p a day – plus interest and admin fees – the star could be slapped with a bill for around £3,000.
Keith confessed: “I’ve still got overdue fines from about 50 years ago. They must be astronomical by now.”

But with an estimated personal fortune of £175million the veteran guitarist shouldn’t have too much trouble stumping up. Keith, who was once jailed on drug charges and admits he has drunk so much over the years he can’t remember all the Stones’ songs, reveals he was a bit of a bookworm in his early days.

Bicycool Library – 3, 2, 1, go!

How to attract library patrons, build the community and show people that librarians are cool? One of the ways to do this is organising Bicycool Library in your town.

Bicycool Library is a bike ride for book and bike lovers usually organised by librarians. The idea of the event was born in Poland and first edition was organised in May 2010. In 2012 it was organised in almost 100 places in Poland. This year it will be organised between May 1st and June 9th in many places all over the world.

One of main goals of organising the Bicycool Library is to promote reading and riding a bike as a way of spending time. Promoting libraries and fighting against stereotypes about librarians is also very important to organisers. They would like to show people that library is the place where they can find not only books, but many unusual interesting events as well.

The Bicycool Library is also helpful in library advocacy. This action helps libraries to collect community and show that library connects people and give them oportunity to do something together and simply to have fun.

There are many ways library can organise it and make local event attractive. Variety of ideas and inspirations for organisers are avaliable on the project website: bicycoollibrary.org. Local organisers can also register there their local edition. This is the way to let organisers and librarians all over the world know how many local events will be organised. Also everybody will be able to see that a town is taking part in it, because every city, town and village will be marked on a special map showing “bicycool” places.

Soon more useful materials will be released on a Bicycool Library’s website, so make sure to visit the website regularly or simply like the project on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Bicycool.Library.

If you are interested in organising Bicycool Library in your town, let people know and register your local edition on the website. -- Read More

Initial Notes on Death of Roger Ebert

Chicago Sun-Times columnist Andy Ihnatko has an initial reaction posted to the death on 4 April 2013 of Roger Ebert.

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