Kindle

Amazon Deletes Items from Kindles... Again

It's like 1984 all over again.

From ArsTechnica:

Amazon may be in the process of stirring up some more trouble for itself thanks to reports that the company is deleting certain kinds of erotica from both the online store and users' devices. The erotica in question is controversial: it talks about certain acts of incest. Judging from Amazon's most recent bouts with book "censorship," users who have already paid for the deleted content are likely to get fired up.

The article goes on to say how one customer who complained about how their content that they paid for disappeared from their Kindle received only chastising remarks from Amazon about the severity of the item they purchased.

Meanwhile, the Strict Leather Forced Orgasm Belt remains on the virtual shelves of online retailer.

Kindles Will Circulate at Concord Library

Wicked Local reports: The Concord Free Public Library has started to circulate five Kindle e-book readers. Each Kindle circulates for a two-week period and comes loaded with several regional travel guides and approximately 50 popular titles including “Freedom: a Novel” by Jonathan Franzen, “Moonlight Mile”by Dennis Lehane, “Tinkers” by Paul Harding, “At Home: A Short History of Private Life” by Bill Bryson, and “Grand Design” by Stephen Hawking. Also included are such local favorites as “Little Women” by Louisa May Alcott, “Walden and Other Writings” by Henry David Thoreau, and “Wicked: Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West” by Gregory Maguire.

'LJ,' 'SLJ' Virtual eBook Summit Draws 2,500 Attendees

Calvin Reid from Publishers Weekly reports that the one-day online event was extremely successful. The Summit featured a keynote by technologist Ray Kurzweil and more than 15 hours of presentations, "E-Books: Libraries at the Tipping Point" focused on every aspect of the developing e-book market and its impact on public, school, and academic libraries. Held September 29 and organized by Library Journal and School Library Journal, the virtual "summit" on e-books certainly delivered on its promises.

The web meeting brought together more than 40 respected experts (including this reporter and PW features editor Andrew Albanese) from across the spectrum of library professionals, academia, and tech journalism as well as the LJ/SLJ staff. An audience of more than 2,500 digital attendees (representing more than 800 public libraries, over 400 academic libraries, and more than 400 school libraries) attended the one-day virtual conference. Ian Singer, v-p, content & business development for Media Source, parent company of LJ and SLJ (no longer affiliated with PW), said the conference was meant to address the fact that "public and school libraries are struggling to understand the e-book industry. We wanted to bring libraries and publishers together and offer a huge knowledge dump about what e-books are and what the challenges are for libraries."

Did you attend? What did you think of the event?

Sign Up for On-Line Summit--eBook: Libraries at the Tipping Point

Sign up for a day-long virtual conference to be held on Wednesday Sept 29 from 10am - 6pm EDT--eBooks: Libraries at the Tipping Point, a unique online conference that explores the way the digital world is changing books and how these changes are reshaping the way we produce, distribute, and consume them.

This event will offer librarians, technology experts, publishers, and vendors a glimpse into the future of libraries with keynote speeches, special tracks, and an exciting exhibit area. Don’t miss this opportunity to investigate the evolving role of libraries in the twenty-first century!

Librarians and library administrators will learn about current best practices for library eBook collections and explore new and evolving models for eBook content discovery and delivery. Publishers and content creators will learn how to effectively identify and develop the ‘right’ content offerings for each segment of the relatively untapped library eBook market. ebook platform vendors and device manufacturers will learn just what libraries need and want in this rapidly changing environment. It's a party and everyone's invited!!

FOUR SPECIAL TRACKS: -- Read More

eReader Price War Results in Offer of Rebates

Some people who were on the fence about buying a dedicated e-reader may be celebrating Monday’s price war between Barnes & Noble’s Nook and Amazon’s Kindle. For the first time, both devices now cost less than $200.

But there was one group who wasn’t celebrating: People who recently bought the devices at their former price of $259. Both Amazon and Barnes & Noble were promoting the devices as Father’s Day gifts at the higher price (although Barnes & Noble was including a $50 gift card with purchases).

Now some good news: Both companies say they’re willing to refund customers who bought their e-reading devices recently. You just have to ask for it.

Amazon says it will give the $70 price difference between an old and new Kindle as a credit to customers whose devices were shipped in the last 30 days. Wall Street Journal.

Three eBook Readers on the iPad

Matthew Miller from Zdnet reports on his iPad reading experiences: "One of the first things I did when my iPad arrived was load up the iBooks and Amazon Kindle applications. I then saw yesterday that Kobo launched their ebook application and am now just waiting to see an iPad-optimized Barnes & Noble eReader client appear. I have a B&N nook and Sony Reader 505 (the old one), but have to honestly say the iPad may have turned these into devices to give away to family and friends. The major strengths of the iPad are the multiple client support and integrated, controllable backlight while the weaknesses are the lack of eInk, lack of Adobe Digital Editions support (for those free library books), and weight in your hand compared to dedicated ebook devices. I captured screenshots of the three ebook applications currently on my iPad starting on this page of the iPad Experience Series image gallery and present you with some thoughts on these three below. Do you think the iPad can replace your dedicated ebook reader?"

Borrow Books, and a Kindle To Read Them On @ Your library

The Shaler Library is letting Phil Breidenbach, 54, of Glenshaw PA and a handful of other patrons experiment with an Amazon Kindle, a hand-held device for reading online books. Shaler will be the first local library to lend such gadgets to the general public when it introduces them during National Library Week in mid-April.

"If books move to a format that doesn't take up space, that will free up libraries to do other things," said Marilyn Jenkins, executive director of the Allegheny County Library Association, a group of suburban libraries, including Shaler. Story from Pittsburgh Live.

Justice Dept. settles blind students v. Kindle controversy

Four universities have agreed they will not purchase, recommend or promote use of the Kindle DX, or any other dedicated electronic book reader, unless the devices are fully accessible to blind students, according to the US Department of Justice.

Publishers Afraid To Be Left Out of Kindle Profits, Form Group

Publishers Afraid To Be Left Out of Kindle Profits, Form Group
Twenty one book publishing companies in Japan are joining together to form one organization to re-negotiate book copyright law with the Japanese government. The publishing companies are afraid of losing income from Digital E-books.

Kindle/Amazon Fans Punish Book that Delayed Digital Edition

What impatient folk we are. While publishers are delaying the release of a book's Kindle edition to give the hardcover edition a chance to sell, Kindle readers (kindlers?) despair over the wait.

Case in point: the much buzzed about new book "Game Change," which spills secrets about the 2008 presidential election. The book has been deluged with one-star, negative reviews from apparent Kindle fans who are protesting publisher HarperCollins' decision to delay the Kindle version to Feb. 23. Those one-star reviews have contributed to a ho-hum average customer review rating of a 2.5 stars (out of 5). Customer reviews are an important factor for book sales on Amazon, and it will be interesting to see if the Kindle protests spread.

Here's one example of a customer's review of "Game Change": "This is time-sensitive material. No one is going to care in 6 weeks when it is released for the kindle. People want it now. The publisher is shooting themselves in the foot. They'd have made more money overall by offering the kindle version now."

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