Kindle

May 4, 2012 - A Day Against DRM

Dan York writes about why he's against Digital Rights Management:

As an author of multiple technical books, and a prolific online writer, I care a lot about intellectual property issues as they pertain to my content. On one level, you might think I would be extremely concerned about people stealing and re-using my content. And don't get me wrong... I am concerned. I choose distribution licenses carefully and I have pursued those who have scraped my content to simply wrap it in ads. But I do NOT see "DRM" as the answer.

As a reader and as an author, I truly hate Digital Rights Management (DRM) for ebooks and look forward to the day when it ceases to exist. My latest book, "Migrating Applications to IPv6" was published DRM-FREE by O'Reilly and I plan to publish all future books DRM-free as well.

York goes on to list six reasons why he hopes to see the end of DRM in the near future.

Amazon Announces the Kindle Owners Lending Library

And so, it begins.

Today, Amazon announced the Kindle Owners Lending Library.

Kindle Touch

One thing the video shows is Kindle x-ray that is a feature people may not be aware of even if they are generally very knowledgeable about ebook readers.

Kindle Touch, Wi-Fi, 6" E Ink Display - includes Special Offers & Sponsored Screensavers on Amazon

Amazon’s Future Is So Much Bigger Than a Tablet

Wired's Epicenter blog takes a look at Amazon.com and how it's rumored tablet device may position Amazon as the dominant e-tailer in just about everything.

"A few years ago, people laughed at Amazon’s Kindle, especially its clunky hardware design and CEO Jeff Bezos’ breathless rhetoric about how it would change how customers bought and experienced media. Now that we’re getting closer to the unveiling of Amazon’s long-rumored, slickly designed multimedia tablet, nobody’s laughing any more.

Amazon has swiftly become the most disruptive company in the media and technology industries. Its potential in this space is simply off the charts: bigger than Apple’s, bigger than Google’s or Microsoft’s. It’s becoming a purer version of all three."

LISNews Now Available Via Kindle Blogs

And now LISNews is available by way of the Kindle platform: http://ur1.ca/4xp1k

As noted in the notice above captured from Identica, LISNews is now available via Kindle Blogs. Amazon sets the price for a monthly subscription and right now it is set at $1.99. We've got no input at all as to what Amazon charges in this instance. As long as you have a Kindle device you can get posts right out of the main feed delivered via Whispernet. According to Amazon, links in stories will work and will take you to linked content.

This is a bit of an experiment in plumbing LISNews content into other platforms. To get a subscription, visit Amazon. If you want to transmogrify RSS feeds on your own, see the right-hand side of the LISNews page for the XML link chiclet.

Will Kindle Kill Libraries?

Via Justin Hoenke (@JustinLibrarian)
From a local Portland ME paper: "Will Kindles kill libraries?"
Portland ME Phoenix:

Public libraries have a fraught relationship with the digital book market — so fraught, in fact, that conferences like Book Expo America and the American Library Association Annual are dominated by talk of it. The debate rages on industry blogs, and librarians have launched Internet campaigns against at least one major publisher due to their approach to digital sales.
The latest marauder at the gates is Amazon. In April, the company announced that by the end of the year, Kindle users will be able to borrow books from over 11,000 local libraries through digital-content distributor OverDrive.
This week, OverDrive itself will host its own conference to help libraries deal with a massive onslaught of patrons clamoring to check out books on their Kindles. Can embattled public institutions handle such a drastic change? Does Kindle come to kill the American library, or to save it?

KILL: GOOD BOOKS WILL BE HARDER TO FIND
In the world of print, the library is king. Library sales comprise a full 10 percent of total US book sales, and publishers are happy to offer their biggest clients deep discounts to get their titles on the shelves.
Not so for e-books. Libraries get no discount on e-books at all. In fact, individual consumers pay less for e-books than libraries do. What's more, libraries often end up paying more for e-books than they do for their physical counterparts.

Novel New Scam: Cybercrooks Target Kindle

Novel New Scam: Cybercrooks Target Kindle
With nearly a million titles available for its on-the-go readers, the Amazon Kindle and its associated e-book apps have revolutionized the reading world. Lately, however, they've also opened up an enticing new vector for online attacks.

The e-books available for purchase in Amazon's Kindle Store have – some would say – an advantage over physical books: Authors can include hyperlinks to websites. But according to the security website ZDNet, scammers are taking advantage of the technological text, directing readers' clicks to deceitful and malicious Web pages.

Kindle Magazine Subscribers...Caveat Emptor

From Gizmodo: If you're a Kindle owner with a magazine subscription, and you decide to stop subscribing, the back issues you previously downloaded are also lost—for good. That's right—there is no way to retrieve what you already paid for and supposedly, already own. To top it all off, there is also no existing way to transfer old issues of your subscription to a new device before you cancel. So it looks like if you chose a digital subscription for The New Yorker over its print version, you're pretty much stuck continuing the service—unless, of course, you're willing to lose your entire collection; both future and past issues.

Exchanging Real Books for Unwanted Kindles

If you happen to be in the Portland, OR area and have an unwanted/unused Kindle, take it to Microcosm Publishing book and zine store and leave with an equivalent value in printed books....

Details here

Reviewing the impact of Kindle not supporting or supporting library books

Reviewing the impact of Kindle not supporting or supporting library books
Three possibilities for Kindle and Library Books
There are actually three possibilities when it comes to adding support for library books to Kindles -
1.Kindle doesn’t add support for library books.
2.Kindle adds support for library books using some format other than ePub.
3.Kindle adds support for library books using ePub.
The difference between the latter two might not matter much to customers who want library books, but it matters immensely to Amazon.
The 32% of people who want support for library books

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