Google

Google cache raises copyright concerns

C|net is running a story with some complaints about the Google cache feature. A New York Times spokeswoman talks about the "problem" of Google's (free) caches of articles in the NYT restricted archives. -- Read More

Is Google God?

Jen Young shares Is Google God?, op-ed piece from The NYTimes, by Thomas Friedman.
He says while we may be emotionally distancing ourselves from the world, the world is getting more integrated. That means that what people think of us, as Americans, will matter more, not less. Because people outside America will be able to build alliances more efficiently in the world we are entering and they will be able to reach out and touch us — whether with computer viruses or anthrax recipes downloaded from the Internet — more than ever.

Google calls in the 'language police'

BBC News Online reports the popularity of the name Google, is becoming troublesome for the company.
Google's problem is one of the paradoxes of having a runaway successful brand. The bigger it gets, the more it becomes part of everyday English language and less a brand in its own right.
But the current obsession on building brand status has ushered in a new phase in language. So much so, that experts now fear trade mark lawyers are trying to police the otherwise natural evolution of the English diction.

As Google Goes, So Goes the Nation

Thanks to Jen Young for A NYTimes Article on Google that says Seen from a Google's eye view, in fact, the Web is less like a piazza than a souk — a jumble of separate spaces, each with its own isolated chatter. The search engines cruise the alleyways to listen in on all of these conversations, locate the people who are talking about the subject we're interested in, and tell us which of them has earned the most nods from the other confabulators in the room. But just because someone is regarded as a savant in the barbershop doesn't mean he'll pass for wise with the people in the other stalls.

All Eyes on Google

Forbes.com Takes A Long Look at Google.
They say to survive and succeed will require lots of talent, lots of acquisitions and lots more money. More important, Google will need to quell the hubris that is much in abundance at the jubilant company these days.

Harvard: Google SafeSearch blocks ALA

According to Search Engine Watch, researchers at Harvard Law recently tested Google's SafeSearch pornography filter and found that it overblocked to an alarming degree. One of the sites specifically mentioned is that of the American Library Association.

Google snaps up Applied Semantics

Google said Wednesday that it acquired Applied Semantics, with the goal of bolstering its search and online advertising programs and perhaps also throwing of a roadblock in the path of archrival Overture Services, whose shares fell more than 25 percent on Thursday.
Internet News.com and CNet News.com have stories.

Inside the Soul of the Web

"Mankind's questions unscroll day and night on a computer screen in an office hallway in Mountain View, California."

"Workers here at Google were once fascinated to watch the queries climb up and off the screen, two per second, 173,000 per day. But they rarely stop to glance anymore. Most Google employees long ago lost interest in the words and the astonishing numbers they represent: Each of these questions, culled randomly from six giant server farms scattered around the world, represents 1,500 inquiries, totaling 260 million Web searches per day."

"Tucson, Arizona > Krispy Kreme DonutsStamford, CT > Rhumba
Canberra, Australia > Naturist Boy
AOL, US > How to Pray to the Rosary" (from Wired)

The Google Alphabet

Nathan Dintenfass and Ben Archibald wondered what came up for a google search on all the letters of the alphabet.
So they played around with the Google Web Services API and presto, the first hit you get (in English) when you type each letter into Google is
at The Google Alphabet.

Google filter blocks innocuous sites

"A new report prepared by Harvard University's Berkman Center says that Google's filtered search technology incorrectly blocks tens of thousands of innocuous Web pages, including ones created by Apple Computer, IBM, the White House, the Library of Congress and the Washington Post."

"The errors arise because of the way Google designed its SafeSearch feature, which can be enabled or disabled through a preferences page. Instead of requiring human approval before Web pages are labeled as adult, Google uses a proprietary algorithm that automatically analyzes the pages and makes an educated guess." (from Cnet)

Syndicate content