Google

Google celebrates fifth birthday

The BBC reports Google celebrates fifth birthday.
They say they more than 200 million and Google has become a phenomenon that has transcended its online origins.

It has expanded beyond just searches to encompass comparison shopping, news, web logs and even a service that blocks pop-up ads.

Real-Time Testing of Google SafeSearch Exclusions

Gary Price spotted some interesting results while using the Real-Time Testing of Google SafeSearch Exclusions.
Head over to The Resource Shelf to see what he found. He set out to see how Google’s SafeSearch would handle a couple of basic queries for names of U.S. Presidents. The results are interesting.

Egads! Google News Alerts

From http://www.google.com/newsalerts

Google News Alerts are sent by email when news articles appear online that match the topics you specify.

Some handy uses of Google News Alerts include:

  • monitoring a developing news story

  • keeping current on a competitor or industry
  • getting the latest on a celebrity or event
  • keeping tabs on your favorite sports teams.

    Getting set up with this is quite simple. One must simply enter their query, select how often they would like to be updated (daily or as it happens), then enter their email address.

    Is this cool, or what?

  • If You Liked the Web Page, You'll Love the Ad

    Publishers, including The Washington Post's Web site, which is owned by The Washington Post Company, and the car-buyers advice site Edmunds.com, have turned to Google or Overture to sell ads pegged to the content that each visitor selects. When a visitor goes to the Book World page on WashingtonPost.com, for example, the person is likely to see a text ad for a self-publishing company or some other book-related advertisement, placed there by Google's advertising service.


    The technology is not yet foolproof. The online edition of The New York Post, which is owned by the News Corporation, ran an article last month about a murder in which the victim's body parts were packed in a suitcase, and Google served up an ad for a luggage dealer.

    I wonder what the ads for a story about LISNews would look like?

    Here's the full article [NYT, reg'req]

    via jen

    Digging for Googleholes

    Slate has an good piece highlighting some drawbacks of using Google.

    The 3 Googleholes are:

    It is a fine article, but perhaps a bit confused. It praises Google's Page Rank system, even though it clearly is invloved with the Googleholes the author details. And of course I would have been happier if the article mentioned libraries as a place to fill in Googleholes. So we know how to best teach them, it is always good to be reminded of the problems our patrons have searching.

    Google cache raises copyright concerns

    C|net is running a story with some complaints about the Google cache feature. A New York Times spokeswoman talks about the "problem" of Google's (free) caches of articles in the NYT restricted archives. -- Read More

    Is Google God?

    Jen Young shares Is Google God?, op-ed piece from The NYTimes, by Thomas Friedman.
    He says while we may be emotionally distancing ourselves from the world, the world is getting more integrated. That means that what people think of us, as Americans, will matter more, not less. Because people outside America will be able to build alliances more efficiently in the world we are entering and they will be able to reach out and touch us — whether with computer viruses or anthrax recipes downloaded from the Internet — more than ever.

    Google calls in the 'language police'

    BBC News Online reports the popularity of the name Google, is becoming troublesome for the company.
    Google's problem is one of the paradoxes of having a runaway successful brand. The bigger it gets, the more it becomes part of everyday English language and less a brand in its own right.
    But the current obsession on building brand status has ushered in a new phase in language. So much so, that experts now fear trade mark lawyers are trying to police the otherwise natural evolution of the English diction.

    As Google Goes, So Goes the Nation

    Thanks to Jen Young for A NYTimes Article on Google that says Seen from a Google's eye view, in fact, the Web is less like a piazza than a souk — a jumble of separate spaces, each with its own isolated chatter. The search engines cruise the alleyways to listen in on all of these conversations, locate the people who are talking about the subject we're interested in, and tell us which of them has earned the most nods from the other confabulators in the room. But just because someone is regarded as a savant in the barbershop doesn't mean he'll pass for wise with the people in the other stalls.

    All Eyes on Google

    Forbes.com Takes A Long Look at Google.
    They say to survive and succeed will require lots of talent, lots of acquisitions and lots more money. More important, Google will need to quell the hubris that is much in abundance at the jubilant company these days.

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