Google

Amended Google Book Settlement Filed: Links to Court Filings, Early Press Coverage and Analysis, etc.

The Amended Google Book Settlement Agreement was filed Friday. Links to the text and other related court filings, plus early press coverage, a summary of changes and FAQ, press releases issued by parties involved the lawsuit and sources for a legal analysis of the amended agreement are provided on Law Librarian Blog at http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/law_librarian_blog/2009/11/amended-google-book-settlement-f...

Ars Technica also posted a piece in the matter.

Google Book Search Revised Settlement (2.0) Released; What About Libraries?

The Resourceshelf is going to be on the lookout for news, commentary from experts, and viewpoints from various organizations and companies involved in the GBS story. They’re posting selected snippets with links to the full text. They also know that in the document filed with the court, there is one mention of libraries, public libraries to be specific.

What Are We Searching For? Google Suggests

Google Suggest Reveals What We're Searching For
The answers to today's crossword, Jewish baseball players, testicular comfort, and the right way to pronounce "Reuters." Google is collecting and storing what we write. Once you start looking for them, unexpected suggestions start popping up everywhere.
See Also:
Awkward Suggestions and Contrasts in How Google Suggests Searches

The Relationship Between Public Libraries and Google: Too Much Information

Article in First Monday

Abstract:

This article explores the implications of a shift from public to private provision of information through focusing on the relationship between Google and public libraries. This relationship has sparked controversy, with concerns expressed about the integrity of search results, the Google Book project, and Google the company. In this paper, these concerns are treated as symptoms of a deeper divide, the fundamentally different conceptions of information that underpin the stated aim of Google and libraries to provide access to information. The paper concludes with some principles necessary for the survival of public libraries and their contribution to a robust democracy in a rapidly expanding Googleverse.

Full article here.

The Global Antitrust Battle Over Google's Library

The case presents a tangle of issues: how to create new markets for old books without shortchanging authors; how to nurture new technology without stifling competition; and how to preserve all that when one company — in this case, Google — is pioneering the revolution and could profit handsomely. One commentator, who supports the original settlement, has called it "the World Series of antitrust."

The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind

China accuses Google of censorship

TheInquirer.net: The Chinese Communist Party's main newspaper has accused Google of keeping searchers away from its website after it reported on a copyright dispute.

The People's Daily had reported on a Chinese group's complaint that Google's planned online library of digitised books might violate Chinese authors' copyrights.

For three days Google searches for the report, in the books section of the website, warned users the site might contain harmful software. The paper argues that the Chinese search engine Baidu did not return a similar warning.

Full story

Obligatory Google Wave Post

In the middle of last week, I got my coveted Google Wave invite. Ever since it had been announced, I had been excited for the September 30th open preview invite. While I didn’t get invited on the first round of invites, my proverbial Golden Ticket came a week after. I had just gotten in at the library that morning when I saw the “wave-noreply” in my Gmail.

There was to be no work done that day.

Indeed, I got into the interface and bounced around the boxes like a six year old on a sugar rush. What’s this do? What’s that do? I made a wave and started trying out all of the headers and extensions (those are the little programs you can add to your toolbar inside of wave). It was symphony of button mashing orchestrating a flurry of trial and error. As people came on, the discoveries continued to abound. (“I can see you typing!” “I can see you typing too!”) Over the last couple of days, people have been dragging files into waves and trying out applications and more extensions. I’ve been watching waves build up to over 100 members and options being added left and right. But, as there are many posts and write-ups about every aspect of Google Wave, I will go a different route to describe my ultimate impression. -- Read More

Google plans 'buy anywhere, read anywhere' offer

Google is poised to launch its "buy anywhere, read anywhere" digital books programme Google Editions simultaneously in the US, UK and Europe within the first half of next year.

Speaking at the Tools of Change conference in Frankfurt, Amanda Edmonds, Google's director of strategic partnerships, said the programme would be rolled out by June. Edmonds said one of the strengths of Google's offering was that once bought, the e-book would exist in a "cloud library", which could be accessed from potentially any device, including laptops, "smart phones" or e-readers. "As long as you can get onto the library, you can access it," Edmonds said. "All books will live in the same library, so it doesn't matter where you buy it or where you read it."

Full story

Google Begins Fixing Usenet Archive

Wired Says Google has pulled its Google Groups development team out of the basement broom closet and begun patching up its long-broken Usenet library, in response to their story Wednesday highlighting the company’s neglect of the 700 million post archive.

Syndicate content