Amazon.com

Kindle Book Credit

Amazon has been sending out this email as a result of legal settlements between several major e-book publishers and the Attorneys General of most U.S. states.

Dear Kindle Customer,

We have good news. You are entitled to a credit for some of your past e-book purchases as a result of legal settlements between several major e-book publishers and the Attorneys General of most U.S. states and territories, including yours. You do not need to do anything to receive this credit. We will contact you when the credit is applied to your Amazon.com account if the Court approves the settlements in February 2013.

Hachette, Harper Collins, and Simon & Schuster have settled an antitrust lawsuit about e-book prices. Under the proposed settlements, the publishers will provide funds for a credit that will be applied directly to your Amazon.com account. If the Court approves the settlements, the account credit will appear automatically and can be used to purchase Kindle books or print books. While we will not know the amount of your credit until the Court approves the settlements, the Attorneys General estimate that it will range from $0.30 to $1.32 for every eligible Kindle book that you purchased between April 2010 and May 2012. Alternatively, you may request a check in the amount of your credit by following the instructions included in the formal notice of the settlements, set forth below. You can learn more about the settlements here:
www.amazon.com/help/agencyebooksettlements

In addition to the account credit, the settlements impose limitations on the publishers’ ability to set e-book prices. We think these settlements are a big win for customers and look forward to lowering prices on more Kindle books in the future.

Thank you for being a Kindle customer.

The Amazon Kindle Team

Amazon, Forced to Collect a Tax, Is Adding Roots

By building warehouses across the country, the retailer hopes to cut as much as a day off its two-day shipping times.

Booksellers concede that Amazon, which offers a flat annual rate for fast shipping to encourage frequent orders, is still likely to be cheaper even when it collects taxes. The most Mr. Barnard can hope is that Amazon’s notoriously low margins — it makes little more than a penny for every dollar in sales — will eventually catch up with it. “Same-day delivery is very, very expensive,” he said.

States began aggressively asserting that Amazon should collect taxes in 2008, when New York passed a law compelling the company to do so. Amazon is challenging the law in court but is collecting the tax for now.

Full article

Hats off to Amazon

When the story of how Amazon came to dominate the consumer book business is written ten years from now, there will need to be a chapter entitled “September 6, 2012?.

Commentary by publishing consultant Mike Shatzkin.

Amazon to Allow Kindle Fire Users to Pay to Block Ads

In an apparent switch in its pricing policy, Amazon said over the weekend that it would allow users of its new Kindle Fire tablet to pay to turn off ads as it had done with earlier devices.

Full article

Amazon announces new Kindles

Amazon announced three new Kindle Fire tablets and three new e-ink Kindles today.
Two of the e-ink models have a built in screen light.

Here are some articles:

1) Kindle Paperwhite Hands On: What a Beautiful Screen (Gizmodo)

2) Amazon Showcases New Kindle Tablets; Shares Hit All-Time Highs (WSJ)

3) Amazon answers glowing Nook with Kindle Paperwhite (dvice)

4) Amazon introduces larger, cheaper Kindle tablets (USA Today)

Amazon Glacier Cheap Data Archiving and Backup

A newish service from Amazon that might be useful to more than a few folks around here: Amazon Glacier

Amazon Glacier is an extremely low-cost storage service that provides secure and durable storage for data archiving and backup. In order to keep costs low, Amazon Glacier is optimized for data that is infrequently accessed and for which retrieval times of several hours are suitable. With Amazon Glacier, customers can reliably store large or small amounts of data for as little as $0.01 per gigabyte per month, a significant savings compared to on-premises solutions. -- Read More

Amazon forces Unglue.it to Suspend Crowdfunding for Creative Commons eBooks

Amazon forces Unglue.it to Suspend Crowdfunding for Creative Commons eBooks
Amazon Payments has informed us that they will no longer process pledge payments for Unglue.it, forcing us to suspend all active ungluing campaigns. According to a Senior Account Manager at Amazon, Amazon has decided against “boarding fresh crowdfunding accounts at this time”. Amazon has been providing payment services for Unglue.it, as it does for the popular crowdfunding site Kickstarter.

Did Google create Library Project to crush Amazon?


After years of battling
, the fight between Google and the Authors Guild is finally coming to a head, and the Guild has just presented a key piece of evidence, showing what Google’s intentions may have been all along, and possibly blowing up Google's entire case.

Amazon news

Amazon made a profit of 7 million on revenues of 12 billion.
Article in the NYT: Amazon Delivers on Revenue but Not on Profit

In other news Jeff Bezos donated 2.5 million in support of same sex marriage. Article in the NYT: Amazon’s Founder Pledges $2.5 Million in Support of Same-Sex Marriage

Amazon’s markup of digital delivery to indie authors is ~129,000%

Amazon’s markup of digital delivery to indie authors is ~129,000%

This post is about the where the sales of the book are coming from, and why Amazon takes 48% of digital book sales. Surprising eh? I thought Amazon was the BEST for indie authors, right? We will get into that later.

The book had a great launch, even getting to the #1 Hot Releases spot for Amazon.com for the travel section.

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