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Amazon Offers Readers Early Look at Books With Kindle First

Amazon has introduced Kindle First, a program where customers can access Kindle books a month before their release date.

Story at Teleread

Amazon's Kindle MatchBook Is Out — Will Publishers Opt In?

Amazon launched Kindle MatchBook, a service that lets customers buy steeply discounted ebook versions of books they've already bought in print (from Amazon, of course) on Tuesday. Publishers must opt-in, and as of Wednesday morning, some 75,000 ebooks were available for $2.99 or less.

Story at NPR

Brick-And-Mortar Bookstores Try For Revenge Against Amazon

Renee Montagne talks with NPR's Lynn Neary about the state of Amazon's publishing business. The online giant not only sells books but publishes digital and print books as well.

Listen to story here:

Kindle Matchbook: discounted e-books for those who own the hard copy

Amazon launches Kindle Matchbook: discounted e-books for those who own the hard copy

if you've bought one of 10,000 selected titles from Amazon, you'll be entitled to snag a digital copy for between $2.99 and nothing. The service launches in October and there's no limit on when the purchases were made -- meaning that you could be offered an awkward reminder of the literature you were gorging back in 1995.

Endgadget press release coverage

LISTen: An Program -- Episode #249

This special edition deals with the Groklaw shutdown announced on Tuesday, August 20, 2013. Groklaw is hosted at ibiblio similarly to LISNews and History of the growth of the National Security Agency under both Republican and Democratic Presidents is also discussed.

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Download here (MP3) (Ogg Vorbis) (Free Lossless Audio Codec) (Speex), or subscribe to the podcast (MP3) to have episodes delivered to your media player. We also encourage the use of a service like Throwing a paperback or two in the Stephen's direction off his Amazon wishlist remains possible as he tries to get out of unemployment.

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. To view a copy of this license, visit

An Unexpected Price War Is Making Amazon Book Prices Lower Than Ever

Amazon appears to have slashed the prices of its books, thanks to an promo in which it priced all of its books at least 10 percent below Amazon.

The aggressive pricing strategy has been enough to see Bezos & Co. cut the prices of hardcover book by between 50 percent and 65 percent compared to the usual cover price. Those kinds of discounts have never been seen on Amazon before; typically, it knocks around 40 to 50 percent off as a maximum.

Amazon versus your public library

Amazon versus your public library:
"E-books are becoming more important and we do expect them to grow going forward," said Christopher Platt, director of the joint technology team for the New York and Brooklyn public libraries. "Digital is not a boutique service. It's part of the future of the library."


As Competition Wanes, Amazon Cuts Back Discounts

“Amazon is doing something vitally important for book culture by making books readily available in places they might not otherwise exist,” said Ted Striphas, an associate professor at Indiana University Bloomington. “But culture is best when it is robust and decentralized, not when there is a single authority that controls the bulk of every transaction.”


Thinning Patience for Low Profits Could Equal Higher Amazon Prices

Among Amazon skeptics, patience for the online retailer’s lack of profits has become a source of bemused agony. No other marquee tech company could get away with, at best, earnings in the low millions (to say nothing of ending last year in the red). Despite such low numbers, Amazon’s shares have enjoyed unprecedented success over the last few months.

But the past few days have seen the onset of what could turn into what the short sellers would see as a major correction. If so, it’s not only shareholders who could suffer. A major stock downturn led by investors no longer willing to wait for Jeff Bezos to work miracles could eventually mean higher prices for Amazon customers.

To understand why, first consider the fortunes of one of Amazon’s main rivals.

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