Friday Time Killers

Play Some Library Arcade

These educational games were developed by graduate students from the Entertainment Technology Center, in collaboration with the University Libraries, and the generous support of the Buhl Foundation.

Cool Twenty Questions Game

Based on my experience, out of five or so categories (classic and people), the game was able to answer two out of five times before the twentieth question. The three tougher answers were answered with fewer than thirty questions.

The game FAQ tells us about the possibility of 'contradictions', explaining: "Since 20Q learns everything it knows from the people who play, it is dealing with opinions, not facts. It's more like a folk taxonomy. Folk taxonomies are generated from social knowledge and are used in everyday speech. Since the opinions of people often differ, 20Q must do its best to sort out conflicting information. Contradictions are also one of the main ways that 20Q learns more about something. If enough people contradict what it currently thinks, it slowly changes its mind about that subject and eventually the contradictions will no longer happen." Try 20Q!

Magazine back issues on DVD

This brief post on Boing-Boing let's you know some of the magazines available and soon to be available on DVD. Anybody's collections include some of these already?

Play Library Science Jeopardy

Welcome librarians, MLS candidates, and other interested pursuers of knowledge; welcome one and all to Library Science Jeopardy. Just like the popular television version, the primary rule remains to provide your answer in the form of a question. There are six categories to select from, each containing five answers in ascending order of difficulty. Click on any of these from the game board below and you will encounter your first answer. Below the answer will appear four possibly correct questions, from which you must select the correct question. If you are of the competitive sort, you might want to have pencil and paper handy to keep score. There are no prizes, but, if you guess correctly, you will win an expanded explanation of the correct question.

Latin Phrases for Your Friday

Self-publishing guru Dan Poynter passes on a few Latin zingers that he adapted from the traditional curriculum he learned in school (a long time ago).

"Nescio quid dicas" -
(I don't know what you're talking about)

"Ita erat quando hic adveni." -
(It was that way when I got here)

"Vescere bracis meis" -
(Eat my shorts)

"Noli me vocare. Ego te vocabo." -
(Don't call me. I'll call you.)

"Canis meus id comedit" -
(My dog ate it)

"Die dulci freure" -
(Have a nice day)

"Recedite, plebes! Gero rem imperialem" -
(Stand aside, little people! I am here on official business)

"Utinam barbari spatioum proprium tuum invadant" -
(May barbarians invade your personal space)

"Te audire no possum. Musa sapientum fixa est in aure." -
(I can't hear you. I have a banana in my ear.)

"Utinam coniurati te in foro interficiant" -
(May conspirators assassinate you in the hall)

"Non sum pisces" -
(I am not a fish)

"Senito aliquos togatos contra me conspirare" -
(I think some people in togas are plotting against me)

"Perscriptio in manibus tabellariorum est" -
(The cheque is in the post)

"Non illigitamus carborundum" -
(Don't let the b'stards grind you down)

"Nonne macescis?" -
(Have you lost weight?)

"Braccae tuae aperiuntur" -
(Your fly is open)

"In dentibus anticis frustum magnum spiniciae habes" -
(You have a big piece of spinach in your front teeth)

"Non calor sed umor est qui nobis incommodat." -
(It's not the heat, it's the humidity.)

Rebang (go ahead make up your own definition)

mdoneil writes "Rebang is Chinese for 'Hot Ranking' and Google Rebang will be a Chinese language Zeitgest.
Why is this not hosted on Google's China-based search engine — Google.cn? Because doing so would mean that Rebang would fall under Chinese legal jurisdiction and since not all people who search for Chinese language terms on Google live in mainland China, Google Rebang should show a more transparent and honest view of what people are searching for in Chinese. From searchenginejournal.com Go ahead and rebang, you know you want to."

Conversational Reading's Friday Column: The Literary Pop Quiz

Today's Friday Column over at Conversational Reading (One of the Blogs To Read this year) is The Literary Pop Quiz. The quiz includes Famous First Lines, Current Events, Strange Things Authors Do and Author Quotes.

Another Book Word...from Word a Day

New to me...the word PERICOPE. According to A-Word-A-Day, it means "a selection from a book." (if you're reading this story AFTER October 20, you'll need to find the right webpage here)

Do you think that's what Smiley III thought he had pocketed????

Curious about Cat Holidays? Here's a Complete List from a Ref. Librarian

A flickr friend Susan (Tiger's Lair) is a librarian at Ormond Beach (FL)Library; she's a cat lover and has several great cat groups on Flickr. Here's her comprehensive report on cat holidays through the year, starting of course with January 2-

Happy Mew Year for Cats Day. A few other cat holiday highlights are:

February is Pet Dental Health Month

April is National Pet First Aid Awareness Month and
Prevention of Animal Cruelty Month

and as I believe was pointed out on these pages last spring...

April 28 is
Hairball Awareness Day
.

Check out the link above for the whole cat-calendar year...

Source: Primarily "Chase's Calendar of Events" and a few miscellaneous other sources. Susan adds, "Please note that some might vary slightly from year to year--I was looking at a 2006 edition of Chase's. Monday, October 16 is National Feral Cat Day, the next cat holiday to observe!"

Volunteer to Label Images for Google

birdie writes "Here's Google's image labeling site where you're invited to find an anonymous partner and help label some of the images Google has accumulated while searching the web. You're shown a drawing or photograph and asked to type in words that describe it while the clock ticks down. Kind of like a beat the clock game..."

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