Friends of the Library

There's No Substitute for Friends at Indianapolis' Carmel Clay Library

While the Carmel Clay Public Library has recently faced budgetary constraints, patrons likely haven't noticed any difference, thanks to two local organizations that have raised funds to keep services running.

"We'd be at a loss without our Friends (of the Carmel Clay Public Library) and (Carmel Clay Public Library) Foundation," said Wendy Phillips, the library's director. "They help sustain a level of service that our community has come to expect and that our tax dollars are no longer able to sustain." Indianapolis Star reports.

Library Fundraiser Has DC Area Residents Salivating

The Washington Post reports on sales of a new edition of an old book that's now helping local libraries in the DC area. The book, "300 Years of Black Cooking in St. Mary's County Maryland," was first published in 1975. But it has been enjoying a revival of sales since the St. Mary's County Library system reissued it in September 2005.

Recipes include traditional African American recipes, such as dandelion wine, hog brains and eggs and possum.

"They're recipes that parents had, and grandparents had, that often the children didn't write down," said Janice Walthour, who lives in Lexington Park and wrote a poem for the book.

The book can be purchased for $15 at any St. Mary's County library, or online at St. Mary's County (MD)Library.

Anti-Friend of the Library?

madcow writes "If there's such a thing as an "antifriend" of the library, this is it. The beleagured Jackson County (OR) libraries can't get a break.

"An Ashland Realtor who said he could afford the property tax hike from the levy, Rist said he has spent $2,200 of his own money opposing the libraries and expects to spend another $300 before the election is over.""

Your Library Can Make Money with a Bookstore...Serendipity Has

Just three aisles of books in a room it would take about 30 seconds to walk through yet you could spend an hour or more browsing the shelves and probably find something you just have to have.

And at prices up to about $5, even for hardbacks, a book lover will almost certainly come away with an addition to his or her collection.

The most amazing thing about the Serendipity bookstore, upstairs at the Humboldt County (CA) Public Library, however, is the milestone it reached on Jan. 6: Seven years and two months after it opened, Serendipity's total sales reached $200,000. That's an average of more than $28,700 per year. It is manned completely by volunteers, including the woman who gave birth to the idea Frances Rapin, still an active friend. More from the Times-Standard.

Help Needed! What To Do With Weeded Books?

Here's a letter to the Friends of the Library USA--If you have suggestions for this librarian/friend, I will pass them on...

Hello, Everyone-

I am new to the (FOLUSA) list. I have some questions and I need advice!

I am a Reference Librarian at a small public library in Ohio. I am also helping out our Friends of the Library organization. We have a very small and inactive Friends group and are working on getting it started up again.

I have volunteered to help sort books in our Friends'Room.It is a disaster! We have books everywhere! Some are in poor condition and will be pitched soon. The librarians on staff (including me) have been instructed to continue weeding to make room for a planned renovation this spring.

We will have 2 Friends' Book Sales- one in May and one in Sept. We need to make room for future donations and the weeded books.

My questions are 1) What do your groups do with the overflow of books? (throw them away? give them away?)
2) Are there limitations to what can be done with the books? We are not allowed (by state law) to give away books the library has weeded. They are considered state property and cannot be given away. Why? I don't know. 3) If your group throws the books away, how do you dispose of them so the "public" doesn't perceive you are wasting tax payer dollars?

Any ideas about what to do with all the extra books?

We have some but are looking for other venues as well.

Thank you in advance

Ohio Public Library Friend!

New Friends of the library blog

An Anonymous Patron writes "The Friends group at the Carol Stream (IL) Public Library has set up their own blog. Right now, they're trying to get the word out regarding the library's upcoming referendum.

http://fotl.blogspot.com/index.html"

New Life as a Library Store for Shuttered L.I. Bookstore

The Port Jefferson Library has come to the rescue of Good Times Bookshop, which closed down after 34 years of bookselling in this Suffolk county town.

Rather than let an era of erudition be replaced by run-of-the-mill retail, the library leased the space that once housed Good Times and plans to continue a treasured tradition in tomes. By June, the now-bookless bookshop and its creaky floorboards will be resurrected as a library-run, library-funded bookstore and young adult information station. More from The New York Daily News.

Help A Friend Find Key Dates in Library History

I'm passing along a request I read on my discussion board for Friends of the Library USA...John Gear writes to FOLUSA :

I'm with the Friends of Lansing Libraries (Lansing, MI).
We're considering underwriting with our local NPR affiliate in return for acknowledgments. We can't afford their regular rotation schedules, so I thought that maybe we could get some extra mileage out of fewer spots by placing them on key dates in library history, such as the day that Franklin's library was founded in Philadelphia, etc. etc. etc.

Problem is, I'm having a hard time finding such a list. Does anyone have one or know of a good pointer to where I might find such a thing?

Thanks,
John Gear

FOLUSA Essay Contest, "How Libraries Transform Communities"

Friends of Libraries USA (FOLUSA) informs us, "There's still time to tell us how "Libraries Transform Communities" for a chance to win $1,000 for your library! Entries are due January 2, 2007. Get the word out to your members and patrons today!" Contest rules here..., the first one being "no purchase necessary!"

Drug Tests for Library Volunteers...What's the Deal?

From Gainesville.com (FL), a report on how some devoted library friends and volunteers, many between the ages of 60 and 85, are turned off by new drug testing requirements. Opinions are offered and invited at the Impromptu Librarian Blog.

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