AirBNB to Remove Controversial Ads from Busstops in SF

Business Insider reports on the removal of offensive ads against public libraries at San Francisco busstops.

Some of the ads offended San Francisco residents. One letter to the public library system said it should be spending Airbnb's tax money on staying open later.

"Had you donated that $8 million you spent fighting Proposition F directly to the public libraries you love so much, that could have made a bigger difference. Oh well. Hindsight is 20/20!" said San Francisco State University professor Martha Kenney in her Facebook post.

Another ad, posted on a city bus stop, suggested that the city should be feeding expired parking meters. (We're not sure why.)

Airbnb confirmed to Business Insider that it was taking down the ads after they were posted this morning, and that the campaign was not run using the $8 million it had given to political groups to fight proposed legislation.

5 Lessons Library Websites Can Learn from Buzzfeed

Buzzfeed’s business model relies on shareability, something it has in common with today’s library, which is why library website designers have the opportunity to learn from Buzzfeed’s overwhelming success. Here are the top lessons library website designers can learn from Buzzfeed.

From 5 Lessons Library Websites Can Learn from Buzzfeed


Should authors use Snapchat to target a younger audience?

Teleread asks if authors should be using the Snapchat social media platform to promote themselves. Why?

"In this article on Brand Driven Digital, Nick Westergaard gives Snapchat a look and explains why it matters. Here’s why young adult authors and publishers should pay attention: “nearly half of Americans 12–24 use Snapchat.”

Oh? The exact audience that young adult writers crave."

This begs the question: Should libraries be using Snapchat?

The Hulk draws a crowd at Northlake Library

One doesn't usually see library related stories at Comic Book Resources, but here you go:
The Northlake Public Library in suburban Chicago unveiled its Hulk statue earlier this month to a crowd of more than 300. Trustee Tom Mukite, who joined the board specifically to spearhead the statue campaign, called the event the “largest turnout at the library ever.”

The Franklin Park Herald-Journal also covered the story,
"The lobby filled with local residents such as Amanda Efta, who carried her nephew Aiden Kolanizios. A library trustee offered green cupcakes to visitors.
“This is the biggest crowd the library’s seen in a while,” Northlake Mayor Jeff Sherwin said.
As the sheet was removed from the statue, people applauded, cameras clicked and little kids gazed up or rubbed the big toe — about the size of a grapefruit."

UbuCon Ohio 2013 Announcement

A brief announcement for the UbuCon event being organized by Ubuntu Ohio at Ohio Linux Fest 2013 where librarians curious about Linux and/or Ubuntu are welcome.

Download here (MP3) (ogg)

LISTen: An Program -- Episode #246

This week's episode brings a brief essay, retransmission of an excerpt of a program from US government external broadcaster Voice of America concerning the cyber-snooping situation, and a news miscellany.

Related links:

Download here (MP3) (Ogg Vorbis) (Free Lossless Audio Codec) (Speex), or subscribe to the podcast (MP3) to have episodes delivered to your media player. We suggest subscribing by way of a service like Matériel purchasing needs of the Air Staff can be found from time to time via Amazon where such can be purchased and sent to them.

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. To view a copy of this license, visit

Rizal Library on the End of the World

Rizal Library's Facebook status (Screen Shot At Flickr) on 20 Dec 2012, which says, "If the world does end tomorrow, I want all of you to know that I love you. If it doesn't, kindly return all overdue books on January 7, 2013""


What. Will. You. FIND? NYPL Trailer for their Local History & Genealogy Dept.

"History has secrets, but secrets don't stay hidden if you know where to look": a video by the Milstein Division of the NYPL: click to view.

More about the video's creation here.


British Poem Protests Library Closings

UK author Julia Donaldson has penned a poem in protest at planned library closures.

The writer, who was named Children's Laureate and awarded the MBE last year, said she had used libraries since she was a child and still visited her local branch to research and write her best-selling books.
Her poem, released on Friday to mark National Libraries Day, describes them as places to "meet your heroes, old and new, from William the Conqueror to Winnie the Pooh". The 62-year-old writer, who was born in London but lives in Glasgow, said she wanted to make a serious point in a fun way. She said: "It's just more interesting to put the reasons I love libraries in that form rather than write an earnest article about it. If we lose libraries, we would lose readers and we would become a less literate country." Campaigners say hundreds of libraries face closure, with some groups taking legal action in a bid to save them.

Her Library Poem reads: "Everyone is welcome to walk through the door. It really doesn't matter if you're rich or poor. There are books in boxes and books on shelves. They're free for you to borrow, so help yourselves.
"Come and meet your heroes, old and new, from William the Conqueror to Winnie the Pooh. You can look into the Mirror or read The Times, or bring along a toddler to chant some rhymes.

Libraries Learn to Raise Revenues

PALM COAST, Florida -- These days it seems everybody's trying to make a buck, including public libraries.

And library officials are coming up with some creative ways to do just that, such as handling passport applications and adding merchandise sales and cafes. Long-range plans at the Flagler County Library in Palm Coast call for creating an inviting atmosphere for patrons, with a coffee shop serving as the centerpiece. Officials also hope leasing floor space to a vendor will provide a little extra cash for the library.

"We want people to be relaxed and feeling good," said library director Holly Albanese. "People like to have a cup of coffee when they sit and read the newspaper or the first chapter of a book. We want them to be able to do that here."

Incorporating a casual café into the traditional public library mission of lending books, providing meeting rooms and offering classes to the public is part of a national trend, according to a study by the Primary Research Group, a private marketing company.

"Even the places that don't currently have one (a café) are looking to do it in the future," said Marcia Warner, president of the Public Library Association, a division of the American Library Association. "We're kind of johnnys-come-lately. Museums have been doing this for a lot of years."

More ideas for selling your library at the Lib Success Wiki.


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