LISNews Features

Library Bust Nabs Two Reporters

The Friends of Cuban Libraries writes "According to news agencies such as EFE and ANSA, on Dec. 2 two foreign reporters were arrested in Cuba while visiting an independent library in the town of Sancti Spiritus. The Polish and Swiss journalists have now been deported. The Committee to Protect Journalists quickly protested their arrest."

Using LISNews As A Feed Reader

I'm slowly but surely whipping the new slashcode into shape. The new server is another story, but at least it seems more or less stable now.
It's now possible to add headlines from other sites to the LISNews homepage you seen when you're logged in. It's a very limited list at the moment, but just Let Me Know what other sites you'd like to see and I'll be happy to add them.
Here's a quick how-to:

Click on the Change Homepage link over on the left side navigation. Down at the bottom, you should see a section called "Customize Slashboxes" Make sure "Use Slashboxes" is checked, and then just add whatever boxes you'd like. There's only a few right now (in no particular order): The ALA TechSource Blog , The Library Journal Tech Blog, Steven M Cohen's Library Stuff, Walt at Random and Tame The Web. It takes a while to add a new feed, but I'll be happy to add anything that is Requested.

The Inventor of the World Wide Web

Jay writes "An article published in the American Heritage brought our attention to Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the world wide web. When thousands of web pages are being created each month, most of us tend to use the web without reflecting on how this technology of today came to life. This is an interesting article which in my opinion, a must read.

Excerpts: "It was born just 15 years ago today, by one measurement, yet the Web has managed to affect everything from international commerce to personal relations, from how revolutions begin to how you look up a recipe for corn muffins." and "While the inventors of Netscape and Google and other businesses have amassed millions, Berners-Lee has not capitalized on the Web’s moneymaking potential. Instead he has stood by the principles of open access and the democratizing possibilities of his invention. He holds an academic position at MIT and runs the World Wide Web Consortium, a nonprofit working group dedicated to keeping the Web free and uninhibited." Read the complete article at: The Inventor of the World Wide Web"

NBC taps Brodart for Library wish come true

John Shableski(of Brodart) writes "Hey, just wanted to let you know about this young girl in Mineral City Ohio whose only wish was to have a children's library built in her town.
NBC contacted Brodart to provide the "guts" of the project: shelving, furniture, circ desks, supplies and some books.

Twelve-year-old year old Girl Scout Nicole Donant had already gathered some 6000 books on her own. Some of these books were cleaned and repaird by Nicole. In any case, her wish came true.

How many 12 year olds can do such a wonderful thing? This is such a wonderfully selfless act that goes beyond description.

For our part, we now have over 900 employees who have a new sense of pride in what we do. We were able to turn this request around in only ten days. Normally, it would have been something along the lines of 8 months to two years to deliver a complete library. It's amazing what one little girl can do to galvanize her own community and another that is a few hundred miles away.

Be sure to tune in to Three Wishes this Friday, November 11th at 9pm EST on NBC and you too will see how great this kid really is.

I have a lot of stuff to share with you and I can be reached at 800-474-9802 ext 6270. Thanks--john"

"Lib-rar-i-ans-Are-So-Se-xy"

Friday Funnies from LISNews.com!
(a new feature)

A little Friday Flash Fun from those cheeky Brits: the Library Song

Catch the Sudoku Craze

Friday Time Killers
(a new feature from LISNews)

The fastest growing craze in puzzles these days is Sudoku, a 9-grid number puzzle. Your patrons may have asked you about them (mine have!). Addictinggames.com has a version you can play online--three new puzzles every day.

Waste your time and stave off Alzheimer's, all in one blow!

Keeping Pace With Google: DVDs Are Not The Answer

It keeps clicking for me, and the good news is it seems to be clicking with some other folks as well. So I think this should raise a question. This is a simple question, though it's 800+ words long: With whom does this need to click for it to matter? Does it need to click with the ALA? The directors of the ACRL libraries? If I'm wrong, and this is yet just one more "end of the libraries" time, then our profession live through it just fine. If you agree with me, who should we being trying to convince we're right? Let me explain a little what I'm talking about here.

Like Karen, Gandel's "Wrong Train?" gave me a couple new clicks:

1. This is another "end of the libraries" time when some people are very worried.

2. We are nodes. We are a small piece of a huge information industry that we used to have a monopoly on. -- Read More

Libraries and Librarians In A Digital Future: Where Do We Fit?

I have recently become convinced our future is digital. After following the Google and The Illiterate Monks thread, and reading "How Transistor Radios and Web (and Newspapers and Hi-Fi radio) are Alike" I believe I can see a small bit of the future, and it's not paper based. I'm not even sure I can see a place for libraries. It's not that I want the future to be like this, I believe, as the old saying goes, there is a tide in the affairs of men, which, taken at the flood, leads on to a digital future.


For years I've been on the fence when it comes to our digital future. I've always bought into the assumption that books are here to stay. That libraries will always have a place. That 100 years from now we'll still want to browse the stacks to see what's related. I think I've fallen off that fence, and landed on the side with the digitalists. I've chosen sides based on things I've read from both the crumugednons like Gorman, and the many techno-freaks on the other side. I don't know what this means for the millions of books we hold currently. I don't know what this means for the future of libraries & librarians, nor do I know what, if anything, we can do to ensure we're still around in 20 years, but below I'll share with you why I've moved from fence sitter, to digitalist. -- Read More

The LISNews Librarian Pickup Lines

Originally posted on February 21 2003, this hiliarous collection of librarian pickup lines remains one of our most popular features ever.
The List was originally compiled, (but not tested) by Blake, Aaron and Steven. Many others have contributed to the list since.

Feel free to use them at work, conferences, out at your favorite pub, or anywhere you may find the librarian of your dreams. Note: use at your own risk, may result in slapping, or having a drink thrown in your face.

"Are you on interlibrary loan? Because, baby, you're outta this library!"


What's your cutter number baby?

I bet you have quite a nice book worm!

You must work at a busy library, cuz baby you just increased my
circulation.

Are you a librarian? Well I really need to be shushed!

Damn... you have more hardcovers than my private stash

Are you a librarian, because when you walked in the room I knew I was
overdue!

I couldn't help noticing what a great book bag you have

Have you heard the one about the librarian with more stacks than she
could handle?

You look like a real challenge!

No one believes I am a librarian, maybe you should try to check me out.

You have the tightest hair bun in the place.

I'm like Google, more results than you can deal with.
 
Did I mention I write for LISNews?
 
Let's play search engine:  enter your terms and see if you get
positive results.
 
Soooooo, people tell me that I look like Chris Sherman.
 
I'd catalog you under "Desirable!"
 
You have some back-end architecture.
 
Either my sight's fading fast, or you're the hottest guy I've checked
out all week.

So, you're a librarian? Do you mind if I work on your desk? -- Read More

10 Ways To Make The Internet A Better Place

99% of the stuff on the Internet is trash. Don't help make it 100%. Here's some good ways to make the web a better place for all of us.


Remember that the Internet is permanent. When your motivation goes away or you've changed your mind, that piece you wrote will remain.

Contribute:
The best part of the internet is how it enables collaboration on a scale not known before. You can help by working with many of the collaborative web sites and open source projects.

Maintain:
Patch that computer! Make sure all the computers you control are secure, and make sure you help other people stay updated.

Promote Web Standards:
Using standards helps make your site easy to use and accessible to the largest number of users. It also saves you bandwidth.

Mentor:
Think you know it all? Prove it! Share your knowledge with others.

Support:
It takes time and money to make a quality web site. Don't be afraid to provide some financial support to your favorite sites.

Promote Civility:
There's nothing wrong with being nice. Spend some time focusing on the good.

Be a good neighbor:
There are some basic rules that keep the internet running more efficiently.

Write Right:
Give some thought to what you write.

Add to this list:
We missed something, what is it?

Unplug!
We can all use some time off, the Internet will continue to exist without you for a day. Go outside and play!

Details and ideas below... -- Read More

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