LISNews Features

FBI does not have email because it is a threat

mdoneil writes "Robert Muller head of the FBI said all agents to not have external email addresses because it may be a security threat.

"E-mails can also be the source of viruses," said Mueller. "They can be a source of worms. They can be used to launch denial of service attacks. And consequently, in our secure environment we have to use e-mail in a closed system, but also have access to e-mail outside. And we do have that."

The Tampa SAIC said everyone has email accounts in his office. For more read the BayNews9 story here.
Ya know, sometimes I just want to gouge my eyes out when I read such stupidity. If the FBI can't secure its network then why do I even bother. Who lets these clowns speak in public, we would be better off with Ice-T opening the new FBI office."

What's New @ Your LISNews

The newest version of Slashcode just got dropped into place this weekend by our Hosts and there's a few new features that you might want to play with.

The first is tagging. If you're not familiar with tagging already, you might find it an interesting idea. Tags have been around for a while as a system for users to categorize (aka catalog) web pages. It's hard to compare tagging to "real" cataloging, since tags are by nature uncontrolled, but you could think of tagging as a very chaotic form of cataloging. You are encouraged to use this feature to submit a handful of tags: brief labels that you think best describe any article. You might choose to say that this is an article about 'books' and 'google'

The Slashcode guys describe this as "all very beta", which means it's in the early stages of development, it may be buggy, and it might change substantially in the future. It also means it's short on a lot of really neat features it *could* be doing.

The core developers say they don't know exactly how this will all work, and a lot of it really
depends on how many people participate. If you choose to add your own tags, be aware:

  • Your tags are public. Everyone will be able to see them!
  • Keep your tags brief.
  • Tags are space-separated. Use "publiclibrary", not "public library".
  • We provide a few example tags for you. Use them if you like.
  • Don't forget to click 'Tag' to save your tags.
  • Tags must be all-lowercase, no punctuation. Numbers can
    appear but can't be first. Smoosh them up: for "Web 2.0", tag
    "web20". Max 64 chars.
  • Don't use plurals. It's "library", not "libraries".

It's still brand new, so any ideas you have on how it can be better used, please feel free to let me know.
You might also notice an odd title appearing from time to time on the index page. That's another new feature that allows sectional content to come out from hiding and show itself on the home page. CmdrTaco Explains All over on Slashdot. Essentially anything posted into the sections will peak out on the homepage now. It allows us to fit more good stuff into the same space. I'll be adding a few more new plugins soon that will add some new features that should be fun to use.

One Coach = 3 Reference Librarians

kmccook writes "From the the College and University Professional Association for Human Resources (CUPA-HR). The head football coach's salary would cover the salaries at doctoral institutions of...

three counseling psychologists or

four academic advisers or

three reference librarians or

four accountants or

three help desk managers .

The 2005-06 Administrative Compensation Survey report provides an overview of median salaries from all reporting institutions by affiliation, budget size and enrollment. Comparative tables break down data by budget quartiles and institutional classification. Other tables provide data by institutional classification for males/females, minority/nonminority, years of service and inside/outside hires. Get Surveys here."

Spelling Smackdown: Nuns vs. Librarians

mdoneil writes "No, its not the Baltimore Catechism you'll need for this one, it is Webster's.

The Sisters of St. Walburg Monastery will be taking on the Boone County, Kentucky Librarians.

More from the Associated Press here.
I've got a fiver on the sisters."

Library bar code used in a fake auto inspection

JET writes "http://www.boingboing.net/2006/03/07/funny_handmad e_car_r.html

Over at boingboing.net, there is a link to a fake car inspection sticker where the 'artist' used a library bar code sticker. In the original post linked from boingboig, posters are debating what the library bar cose is supposed to be linked to. Can anyone shed any light on this?"

Charlie Brown has lost a library book

JET writes: Peanuts is rerunning the series of comic strips where Charlie Brown has lost a library book on their website. The storyline starts at this strip.

10 Blogs To Read in 2006

"10 Blogs To Read in 2006" came from my quest to find the people doing the most interesting and original writing on the web. Here is a group of librarians working hard to increase understanding our profession and it's place in the rapidly evolving online world. I tried to choose 10 writers who cover very different aspects of our profession, 10 sites that inform, educate and amuse.
You can think approach this list as just one man's limited understanding of what's being written by people writing about libraries on the web. I think you'll also find it a great place to find something new to read.
Most importantly I hope you'll use it as list you can send to your friends and coworkers who have a negative opinion of blogs.

  1. The ALA Tech Blog
  2. Carnival of the Infosciences
  3. Lorcan Dempsey's blog
  4. A Librarian's Guide to Etiquette
  5. Catalgablog
  6. Library Marketing-Thinking Outside the Book
  7. The Kept-Up Academic Librarian
  8. Librarian.net
  9. Library Link Of The Day
  10. Conservator

Below you'll find expanded descriptions, and some thoughts on the creation of the list. -- Read More

Unraveling of No Child Left Behind

Kathleen writes "The Civil Rights Project at Harvard University helps "renew the civil rights movement by bridging the worlds of ideas and action, and by becoming a preeminent source of intellectual capital and a forum for building consensus within that movement." Studies such as the Unraveling of No Child Left Behind contribute to the intellectual understanding of the effect of politics on human development. The Unraveling of No Child Left Behind: How Negotiated Changes Transform the Law By Gail L. SundermanThe intent of this report is to provide policymakers with information they can use to develop a systemic approach to correcting the flaws in NCLB by documenting the requirements that are difficult for states to implement and identifying areas where the law may not be working as intended. ....To improve NCLB, policymakers need to reexamine the core assumptions that underlie NCLB and reevaluate the mechanisms used by NCLB to improve schools and student achievement. To restore legitimacy to the process, policymakers need to include educators, experts, community leaders, and civil rights groups in an open and honest debate about what is needed to reform schools and improve student achievement."

China's censorship skewered

madcow writes "John Battelle goes off on GYMA (Google, Yahoo, Microsoft and AOL) and their buckling to China's censorious demands. An interesting read. "...[B]ut in the end, it's not GYMA's fault, nor, as much as I wish they'd take it on, is it even their problem. It's our government's problem. Since when is China policy somehow the job of private industry?""

Blog is providing access details for libraries

Ellen McCullough writes "I came across this while doing a Feedster search. This blog appears to be giving away user names, passwords, proxy info, etc. to access library-held and publisher electronic resources.
http://reddy.wordpress.com/
How can we stop this?"

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