LISNews Features

LISTen: The LISNews.org Podcast -- Episode #13

This week's edition of LISTen is helmed by the show's audio engineer, Mike Kellat, and brings two interviews as well as a feature. The Shadow Minister for Education in the Australian state of Victoria, Martin Dixon, talked to Stephen Kellat about recent literacy initiatives there. Participants from Uncontrolled Vocabulary spoke to Stephen about their views of podcasting. Mike presented another edition of Tech for Techies about the mechanics of production. Contributions were also sought in the episode.

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LISTen: The LISNews.org Podcast -- Episode #12

This week's episode of LISTen brings a panel discussion with Andrea Mercado, Aaron Schmidt, and Nate Hill about the case of librarianship perhaps becoming less complex work. A quick look at the zeitgeist was also included at the start of the episode.

Links to blogs of panel participants:
Andrea Mercado
Aaron Schmidt
Nate Hill

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I'm Down On The Future Of Public Libraries

The Marathon County Situation got me thinking all is not well in libraryland. Here's 4 other random posts that did the same.

My 4 Year Old Told Me To “Google It”

Can you connect This Story By Mat Siltala to libraries?

He turned to me and said: “Why don’t you just Google it Dad, because you use it to find everything else”. I guess he does hear me (more then I realize) say stuff like “find it on Google”, or “look it up on Google” with everyday interactions with my wife, friends or clients! It was so funny, cute and genuine that I was speechless.

Cowboy Junkies Paradox

Can you connect This Story By Seth Godin to libraries?

Marketers of all stripes face the same challenge. Your current customers want nothing but the old stuff, but the new customers don't know you exist, so they can't speak up.

Cat teeth: search trumps experience

Can you connect This Story By Stephen Baker to libraries?

Search is replacing the knowledge we gain from experience: the tactile, slightly risky, scratched fingers variety. We can learn more facts this way, but do they mean as much to us?

"The Expectation Economy"

I know you can connect This Post By George Needham over at OCLC:

One of the hardest changes for librarians to face seems to be that people have choices today. When we had a semi-monopoly on required readings, encyclopedias, back issue magazines, and 16mm films, we could pretty much make and enforce any rules we wanted. Those days are gone forever.

Search is replacing the knowledge we gain from experience: the tactile, slightly risky, scratched fingers variety. That search is being done via the web, without any assistance, and without any payment by the searcher.

Seeing this post reminded me I had started to write about 2 recent experiences I had that help reinforce my pessimism about the future of libraries. If you haven't read my old posts on this here's a quick summary: I fear libraries, especially public libraries, are doomed because enough people have enough different reasons to think they're useless now. Enough people won't use them, think of them, or support them when the time comes and this will spell big trouble for our profession in the future. I'm not predicting this, but rather admitting my fears.

LISTen: The LISNews.org Podcast -- Episode #11

The podcast this week brings two interviews. One interview is with Connie Crosby about PodCamp Toronto and lessons for librarianship. The other interview is with tech columnist Don Reisinger about technology use. A note at the end explains why episode twelve will be different and invites listener responses.

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LISTen: The LISNews.org Podcast -- Episode #10

This week's edition of LISTen brings two interviews about cataloging and use of things born digital. I talk with Steven Bowers The Director of Detroit Area Network (DALNET) at Wayne State University who oversees a project that catalogs Youtube videos, and Michael Sauers Technology Innovation Librarian at The Nebraska Library Commission to talk about Cataloging Creative Commons materials. I finish up this week with a commentary inspired by John Berry in which I ask where has the magic of the library gone? Links referred to:
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LISTen: The LISNews.org Podcast -- Episode #9

This week's episode brings a commentary relative to a recent article in Library Journal and podcasting tips from the audio engineer.

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10 Non-Librarian Blogs To Read in 2008

Our first attempt at recommending NON-Librarian blogs includes sites to make your life better, improve your finances, help you be a better marketer, and even one that lets you see other folks deepest darkest secrets. I've included the "honorable mention" list, and a few "see alsos" below. Our goal was to make a list of sites you can read to learn something new that doesn't entirely focus on libraries. Read on below to see why each site made the list. As always, if you don't like the list, supply your own, or let me know who we missed or who we should've left off.

Boing Boing (Feed)
The Bookslut Blog (Feed)
The Consumerist (Feed)
Lifehacker (Feed)
Open Access News (Feed)
Post Secret (Feed)
Read Write Web (Feed)
Seth Godin (Feed)
Slashdot (Feed)
Snopes - What's New (Feed)

In no particular order, here's more on each site, along with the runner ups.

I must admit, I Love Boing Boing. You never know what you're going to see on Boing Boing, from Unicorns and Bigfoot to DRM and the Creative Commons. They call it "a directory of wonderful things" and it certainly is. They're one of the most popular sites on any list for good reason, they set the trends.

Post Secret just barely beat out Cute Overload & Seen Reading in our "silly diversions" category. Post Secret is so compelling it's hard to pass up. PostSecret is an ongoing community art project where people mail in their secrets anonymously on one side of a homemade postcard.

Did you know Patriots QB Tom Brady was once a cast member of The Brady Bunch? Snopes Knows The Truth. Just a bit more popular than Common Craft for "answers", at first glance you might think debunking urban myths is silly, but it doesn't take long until you'll realize this is reference work at it's finest.

LISTen: The LISNews.org Podcast -- Episode #8

This week's episode brings interviews with Blake Carver and Boston Public Library's Scott Colford on the FSF DRM Protests this weekend, and more.

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LISTen for 1 February 2008

Even though LISTen is still supposed to be on hiatus the story Thursday morning relative to Amazon's acquisition of Audible created a stir.

To subscribe in iTunes to receive episodes as they are released please click here. Adding a review in the iTunes Music Store would be very helpful. Donations are also appreciated as we have Skype-related costs to handle.

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Stuff To Do @ Your LISNews Part 3: "Customizing"

This is part 3 of an occasional series I've been writing to showoff all the new features @LISNews. In Stuff To Do @ Your LISNews, Part 1: Reading I covered the feeds and other pages that can give you views of the LISNews content you won't see on the homepage. In Part 2: Writing I covered how you can help us create interesting content by writing comments, on your blog and suggesting stories. The full series will cover "reading," "writing," "playing," "networking," "customizing," "finding" and whatever else I can come up with as I go along. Here in part 3 I'll cover all the options listed on your "My Account" link you'll see over on the left hand side when you're logged in. With these options, you can change how LISNews looks, how your blog looks, how to track and subscribe to threads, and even send messages to other LISNews users.

After running on Slashcode for several years LISNews is now using Drupal. Drupal is an infinitely flexible Content Management System. It allows administrators (like me) a nearly unlimited selection of modules that extend the core functionality. These modules add an amazing number of options for users (like you) to customize what they see on their site. One thing to keep in mind as you read this, everything requires you to login to your LISNews account. You're just an anonymous loser unless you're logged in. I'll start this list with all the options listed behind your "My Account" link you'll see over on the left hand side when you're logged in. With these options, you can change how LISNews looks, track and subscribe to threads, and even send messages to other LISNews users.

You'll first see an option to "Write a private message." Private Messages are just what you would think they might be, little messages you can send to other LISNews users. The "To:" field does an automatic lookup as you type so you won't make any spelling errors. If this sounds too creepy, you are able to opt your account out of this feature.

Next up, you'll see Edit. Clicking on the "Edit" tab allows you to change some important options. You can first change your email or password. I won't go into my big rant on passwords here, but you should never use an important password on random sites like LISNews. You're also able to enter your twitter account settings here if you'd like to cross-post to Twitter. If you fill out the Twitter settings LISNews will spit your Blog and Story posts into you Twitter account. Further down the page you are also able to configure the Theme, Blocks, and control who can send you messages.

Themes change what LISNews look like. I currently have about a dozen themes installed. Choosing a new theme will change how you see the site, and how everyone else sees your blog. When you change the theme you see on the site your blog will look different to everyone, regardless of whether or not you're logged in.

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