LISNews Features

IT Security For Libraries First In A Series

IT Security In Libraries
8. Social Media Security
7. Practical IT Security
6. Integrating IT Security In Your Library
5. 20 Common Security Myths
4. How To Stay Safe Online
3. Passwords
2. Privacy
1. IT Security Foundations

Today's post is long on theory. I'll argue that most any library can be a target, and present some ideas on how to make things more secure in your library.
My first post will cover privacy, because I think it's closely related to security, and it's something we as librarians take seriously. Then I'll cover a bunch of ways to stay safe online, how to secure your browser, PC and other things you and your patrons use every day. I'll also cover some common security myths. Then we'll talk passwords: everything has a password now, and I want to make sure we all understand what it takes to make your password as secure as possible. Then we'll talk network security for a bit, followed by hardware and PC security. Then I'll focus on security issues that you'll find in your library. And last, but not least, some things I think you'll find interesting that sysadmins do with servers to make things safer for you, and that you'll never see as an end user.

One way to begin thinking about security for your library is by asking yourself few questions:

What do you have to lose?
What does your library & patrons have to lose?
What are the bad guys after?

Coming up with even a few quick answers to these questions can be helpful, I think, because it's important to remember we all have something to lose, and that we all have a part to play in keeping ourselves and our libraries safe.

It's also important to know that, ultimately, there is no such thing as a secure computer. Nothing we do can make things 100% safe. We can just make things safer than they were before. All of the security work we do is about reducing risk. It's about knowing what we're up against. We want to reduce the possible frequency of loss (by securing things as much as possible, given our resources) AND we want to reduce the potential magnitude of loss (by limiting what can be lost as much as possible).

To help set the stage for success we should keep in mind 2 things. "Any lock can be picked", and people are the weakest link in security chain. First, people:

2011 Summer Hiatus

It seems that LISTen: An LISNews.org Program will take a couple weeks off to tend to local politics.

As noted above in a notice posted to Identica, LISTen: An LISNews.org Program is going to be taking a couple weeks off. There are some matters of local government politics that the air staff will be tending to. There is a ballot access deadline coming up and we want to do what we can to help a particular local matter onto the ballot before then.

Barring unforeseen consequences, LISTen: An LISNews.org Program will return to air on 8 August 2011.

Creative Commons License
2011 Summer Hiatus by Stephen Michael Kellat is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #160

This week's episode is somewhat light but, then again, we did some technical experimentation. See below: The traditional audio episode is still posted, too. Related links: 10 years ago today BBCWS dropped SW to N America China Radio International now on your local AM station Former Bulgarian foreign minister calls for 'EU WiFi paradise Web censorship moves West: While few may object to blocking access to child pornography, online restrictions set dangerous precedent.

Creative Commons License
Excluding United States Government content incorporated herein, LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #160 by The Air Staff of Erie Looking Productions is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Programming Note Relative To 4 July 2011

There will be an episode of LISTen: An LISNews.org Program released on 4 July 2011 notwithstanding the holiday in the United States of America.

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #159

This week's episode is light in recognition of the ALA Annual hang over. We feature a music break by northeast Ohio band Antiquitous. The song "Ed and Elaine's Promenade" is from their upcoming album "Nexus of the Ley Lines" and was composed by Mister Engineer. Antiquitous describes themselves with: "New melodies from ancient voices for a modern world." A more substantial episode will come once the ALA Annual hang over has passed. A link dump has been posted in the mean time.

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #158

Delayed Notice LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #158

Just a quick note, the LISNews podcast is going to be delayed a day or two this week. Stephen will have a new episode posted ASAP. In the meantime, here's a monkey washing a cat:

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #157

This week's solitary episode talks about e-mails and unintended consequences of Freedom of Information legislation. Highlights from LISEvents.com, LISWire.com, and the slush pile are also presented. Related links: Wolper Extends Its Partnership with Copyright Clearance Center Reporters Committee for the Freedom of the Press "Freedom of Information" Service Center 3News: Palin emails let old media test new media methods Rhodri Marsden: Boring emails that are the stuff of life

Creative Commons License
Excluding United States Government content incorporated herein, LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #157 by The Air Staff of Erie Looking Productions is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #156

This week's second episode brings the essay that was teased out earlier about libraries needing to take stands to bolster their identity. The Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals, the counterpart in the United Kingdom to the ALA, is mentioned. Thursday's bit of Profile America is also presented. Related links: The Annoyed Librarian: Libraries, Literacy, and the Poor Stephen Abram talking about what the brand of libraries is Pew Internet & American Life Project on the surprisingly small user base for Twitter compared to all online adults in the US Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals on libraries making differences in lives Bloomberg Businessweek on the financial state of the United States Postal Service Ed Corrado: MARC is better than Dublin Core Ed Corrado: RDA and transforming to a new bibliographic framework

Creative Commons License
Excluding United States Government content incorporated herein, LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #156 by The Air Staff of Erie Looking Productions is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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