Email

The wired president: Obama creates an e-mail trail

Barack Obama is the first wired president, ready to exchange e-mail with close friends and advisers. When do the rest of us get to read them?

We may have to wait until as late as 2028, depending on when Obama leaves office as president. That's according to leading presidential historians who make their living hunting through records at the National Archives and Records Administration.

Most E-mailed on New York Times

"In Web Age, Library Job Gets Update" is the most e-mailed article on the New York Times as of 17 February 2009, 2:28 am EST. Are there that many librarians emailing this article?

LAW-LIB: hybrid listserv proposal

LAW-LIB is a listserv where law librarians ask and answer legal questions and help each other find legal resources and trouble shoot unique legal reference questions. Currently the list administrator has raised the issue of whether a specific person should be banned from the list and great debate has ensued. What is problematic is that when a debate on a listserv happens it happens in your inbox. A typically amount of emails from LAW-LIB might be 6-12 in a day. The current debate has thrown this number into the range of 50-75 emails.

I wanted to raise a listserv idea that could be debated on a forum that is more conducive to discussion. The power of listservs is that they have a very strong connection with people because the email goes directly to them. The listserv participants are dealing with a "push" information system. My idea is to have a listserv that operates something like the game show Jeopardy in that things would have to be in the form of a question. The listserv would only be for questions. All answers to questions and discussion would be on a corresponding website. Each question sent to the mailing list would automatically be posted to the website. If you wanted to see the answer to a question or provide an answer you would go to the the website. -- Read More

The Word of the Day Is Ex Libris

Today's Word-of-the-Day from Wordsmith.com is ex libris (from the library), but there's also a mention of spam and where it's heading (it would be nice if it was heading in the opposite direction of our inboxes...surely you've heard from Mariam Abachha in the last few years).

Here's the link to subscribe to A.Word.A.Day.

Obama's BlackBerry

In the library world, we rely on technology. We e-mail our colleagues and co-workers. We use the web to find information for us and for others. As a profession, and like many other professions, we've grown increasingly attached to digital communications and we'd find ourselves hard pressed to make do without them.

Not so with the highest office in the United States. The President of the United States really doesn't engage in e-mail because of laws regarding the archiving of Presidential communications, but also because of security. While the ability to send a message instantly to POTUS is a powerful thing, if that message contains classified information and it's intercepted by a hacker, then we're talking a matter of national security.

Nevertheless, our new President is a bit of a geek and is addicted to e-mail and his BlackBerry. He's explicitly stated that "They're going to pry it out of my hands."

So how do you provide the security needed by the President when all he really wants is to use the same tools millions of people use every day? Simple. You get him the most secure BlackBerry ever made.

E-mail Tracking in UK

Lookout, Patriot Act...someone is surpassing you. The UK is spending 25 million pounds to track everyone's email.

I can't imagine how this could work. With the number of meaningless emails my friends and I send back and forth...we'd crash the system!

Bunny Burnstein

E-Mail and the Internet Creating Language

Based on my experience, it is one of Blakes' favorite words: meh.

But there is nothing meh about the journey of the latest entry in the Collins English Dictionary. Rather, it illustrates how e-mail and the internet are creating language.

“Meh” started out in the US and Canada as an interjection signifying mediocrity or indifference and has evolved, via the internet and an episode of The Simpsons, into a common adjective meaning boring, apathetic or unimpressive in British English.

Times Online says "Collins has been aware for some time of the growing use of meh in written and spoken language. The word is widely used on the internet and is appearing in British spoken English as well as in print media.

Cormac McKeown, head of content at Collins Dictionaries, said: “This is a new interjection from the US that seems to have inveigled its way into common speech over here." Love it, us colonists teaching the inhabitants of the motherland new words.

Wrongful Arrest Payout for Librarian in Email Scam

There are all kinds of weird people out there, including some who would like a spanking with a copy of Finnegan's Wake. Check out this story from the New York Daily News:

"The city has agreed to a $25,000 payout for an ex-librarian at the Riverdale Country School in the Bronx who was busted last year for sending bizarre e-mails to his boss. The city agreed to settle Billy Hallowell's wrongful arrest lawsuit rather than go to trial. Hallowell was detained for 30 hours in April last year after cops were told Hallowell had sent a lewd e-mail to his former boss.

"We could do it in the library," the e-mail said. "I could spank you with a vintage copy of Finigan's (sic) wake."

But Hallowell never sent the e-mail. The mixup occurred when librarian Robin Berson responded to an e-mail from Hallowell, who informed her he was quitting, asking him to return a library key. Berson sent the reply to an e-mail address that was nearly identical to Hallowell's. The person who inadvertently received the e-mail sent it back with the bizarre note.

Harassment charges were dropped by the Bronx district attorney.
Hallowell, a freelance journalist, hopes the mixup will spur the NYPD to train their officers in the basics of e-mail and the Internet. "I'm happy that they took responsibility and admitted their mistakes," Hallowell said.

I guess that naughty rep is destined to follow librarians to the grave.

Why organizations need to archive email

Over the past few years, email has become an integral part of the business workflow. This white paper explains why email archiving must be an integral part of every organization. It also examines the different methods for deploying and managing email archive solutions in an organization as well as specifies the key requirements that a full featured email archiving system should include.
In a survey conducted throughout November and December 2004, SERVO asked 100 of their top customers which projects they were most likely to accomplish in 2005. Interestingly, email archiving made it to the top 5 corporate priorities and this finding can easily be backed up as recent market trends show a six-fold increase in demand for email archiving solutions. But why is email archiving so important for organizations?

New discussion list started: Telecommuting Librarians

From Nexgenlib list comes this news:

Good afternoon colleagues,

I recently started a new position as a cataloging librarian for a library services and staffing company headquartered in Wilton, CT -- I am located in lovely Fort Wayne, IN. One of the benefits of the position is my ability to telecommute from home. One of my first actions in my new position was to look for resources for telecommuting librarians and a place to be able to network and have discussions with other telecommuters
on a regular and ongoing basis.

Currently, there is no place for such exchanges to take place. I am pleased to announce the creation of TelecommutingLibrarians, a new electronic list that

I hope will help address this need.

PURPOSE:

This list is intended to provide a forum for discussion of ideas and issues related to telecommuting in libraries and for current or future telecommuters and the challenges faced by working in a non-traditional work environment.

We welcome subscription and participation by all. We believe that this list will be of particular interest to those already telecommuting but everyone is welcome.

HOW TO SUBSCRIBE :

If you would like to subscribe to the new list, please visit the list website:
http://groups.google.com/group/telecommutinglibrarians?hl=en
The list is unmoderated.
We hope to see you there soon!

Hope this becomes a good list for all telecommuting librarians!

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