Academic Libraries

At Least He Didn't Mention The Library...

With the publication of the Freeh report relative to the child abuse scandal at The Pennsylvania State University, Chicago Sun-Times columnist Rick Morrisey is calling for the outright physical destruction of many campus monuments to coach Joe Paterno. Not mentioned in the piece by Morrisey is Paterno Library on-campus which otherwise bears the coach's name.

What Faculty Expect vs What We Think Students Need: The academic library quandary

Jenica Rogers, on her blog Attempting Elegance, has a compelling essay today entitled "Killing Fear, Part 1: The Problem." After discussing the changing expectations of students, the changing attitudes of librarians, and the undeniable policy and service shifts in academic libraries, she discusses revealing findings about what faculty still think it is a library should be doing. It boils down to teaching and facilitating information seeking behavior vs buying and archiving materials. 

Her conclusion:

Put simply, there’s a contradiction between these faculty expectations and emergent and clearly evident trends in information, libraries, and our future. This particular stakeholder group seems to want the very traditional services and roles that others are pointing out are now part of a legacy model.

An interesting read, and I look forward to the presumed Part 2.

 (Updated to fix link to original article. - aw)

Grazing in the Stacks of Academe

Grazing in the Stacks of Academe
Inside there is the deep quiet of protection and near-abandonment. You hear the hum of the lights, turned on as needed; that’s it. There’s a phone to make outgoing calls on the fifth floor. To me the stacks are the most sacred space in the library, yet here nobody’s telling you not to talk. You’re on your own. It’s a situation for adults.

UC Berkeley's libraries next chapter may be cuts

"There are no first-rate universities in the world without a first-rate
library," 110 faculty members declared in a petition asking the university
for an extra year to find other ways of keeping Cal libraries not just
afloat, but great.
"We are in a crisis, and we have to kind of breathe a bit more deeply,"
said engineering Professor Panos Papadopoulos, who signed the petition.
"We need to think more strategically."

Affection for PDA

An interesting article reporting on a recent session at the meeting of the American Association of University Presses (AAUP), relating a discussion about patron-driven acquisitions (PDA) and its impact on library collection development.

"Libraries...are beginning to flip the process of collection-building on its head by striking deals that let their patrons’ reading habits determine which works they purchase."

http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2012/06/20/research-foresees-demand-driven-book-acquisiti...

Infidelity in the Library

"Infidelity in the Library" ooooh, another story about people fooling around in the stacks! No? Oh, it's about books? huh. OK, fine, I'll post it anyways.

"So my books, you see, need some attention. And I just can’t give it to them right now. Fortunately, I am a librarian, and so I know a thing or two about loaning books. So come on over sometime. I’ll set you up with a borrower’s card and you can check out a few books and take them home with you, while I hide in the spare bedroom tenderly opening up tomes on current copyright trends, or sit in my car out in the driveway to steal delicate glimpses into the latest interlibrary loan initiatives."

Librarian Refuses to Sign "Lifestyle Statement"

Librarian Refuses to Sign "Lifestyle Statement"

During his 14 years at Shorter University, Michael Wilson, a librarian, built a library collection for the college’s satellite campus in Atlanta. He shaped his post as the first full-time librarian for adult and professional students. Then he won tenure, and planned to stay at the Baptist college in Rome, Ga., until retirement.

Instead, last week, he effectively handed in his resignation.

[Thanks Charley!]

Library Scream

At the University of New Hampshire, this is evidently an old tradtion- to scream at the library in order to reduce stress.
See it in action at:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fSdAqjq7LrE&feature=youtu.be

A Rarity, Even For the Rare Book Room

A few weeks ago at Brown University, book conservation technician Marie Malchodi opened yet another leather-bound book, one of more than 300,000 rare volumes in the hold of the John Hay Library. With surgical precision, she turned the pages of a medical text once owned by Solomon Drowne, Class of ’73 (1773, that is.). And there, in the back, she found a piece of paper depicting the baptism of Jesus. It was signed:

“P. Revere Sculp.”

Ye gods! Had Marie Malchodi just made contact with Paul Revere, of Boston, silversmith? Revere, who knew of the fiery need to share vital information, would have appreciated Ms. Malchodi’s galloping reaction, which was:

“I have to show this to somebody.” More from The New York Times.

20 years of cowardice: the pathetic response of American universities to the crisis in scholarly publishing

20 years of cowardice: the pathetic response of American universities to the crisis in scholarly publishing
Although their record is pretty bad, universities could still play a major role in making scholarly publishing work better – and save themselves money in the process – with two simple actions:

--Stop the flow of money to subscription journals. Universities should not renew ANY subscriptions. They should, instead, approach them with a new deal – they’ll maintain payments at current levels for 3 more years if the journal(s) commit to being fully open access at the end of that time.
--Introduce – and heavily promote – new criteria for hiring and promotion that actively discourage the use of journal titles in evaluating candidates.

Pages

Subscribe to Academic Libraries